New Assassin’s Creed: Unity Video Showcases Fancy Game Engine


New Assassin's Creed: Unity Video Showcases Fancy Game Engine

The Assassin’s Creed series has had an interesting progression throughout its long, continuous run. Where the first few installments served to introduce gamers to an incredible new world and play style, later installments (namely Assassin’s Creed: Revelations and Assassin’s Creed 3) didn’t quite live up to expectations. Yet after the smashing success of Black Flag, fans are ready to let the series back into their hearts. Enter Assassin’s Creed: Unity, which promises to not only up the stakes and gameplay, but also the amount of detail put into the game’s setting.

If you’ve played any game in the series before, then you’re already aware of just how breathtaking much of the scenery can be. While much of this can be owed to Ubisoft’s eye for visually interesting settings, it also helps that their Anvil engine is one of the most powerful used on the market currently. Now that the engine has been updated to work on next-gen consoles, Ubisoft has been eager to show off its capabilities, starting with that uber-scripted yet still impressive trailer shown at E3.

Since then, they’ve released a lengthy video (see below) detailing how exactly they built that trailer in preparation for the show. If that weren’t enough, they’ve also released a fully animated trailer showing off much of the graphical capabilities that will be on display in Assassin’s Creed: Unity. This trailer, which can also be seen below, doesn’t include a tour of Ubisoft’s offices, but it does feature Creative Director Alex Amancio gushing over his team’s nearly 1:1 recreation of the Notre-Dame Cathedral, which is admittedly impressive and just begging for exploration.

If you need any more reason to get excited for Assassin’s Creed: Unity, then check out the two videos below and let your mouth start watering at the graphical possibilities offered by next-gen consoles.

Be sure to pick up Assassin’s Creed: Unity when it’s released on October 28, and don’t let the Notre-Dame Cathedral go unmolested.


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