Alvin And The Chipmunks Re-Imaginer John Cohen Will Produce Angry Birds Movie


Alvin And The Chipmunks Re-Imaginer John Cohen Will Produce Angry Birds Movie

Keeping things totally relevant and not at all taking a huge financial risk given that we probably won’t even be using mobile phones in 2016 (we’re predicting futuristic brain transceivers), the creative geniuses over at Angry Birds have announced a feature film adaptation for just around then.

And tasked with dragging a fully-fledged narrative structure out of a mobile app game which involves firing colored birds at pigs taking refuge in various flimsy structures is John Cohen, the optimistic chap who has just signed on to work such wonders.

Now, before you ponder which lucky studio have attached themselves to such a financially sound project like this, we’ll tell you: none. Rovio, the company who actually make Angry Birds, are set to finance this one themselves. After all, what kind of maniac would give up such a lucrative option like this? Especially one with that enviable four-year production date.

John Cohen previously worked on animated films Hop and Despicable Me, and apparently “re-imagined Alvin and the Chipmunks” for a new generation, despite it not appearing on his IMDB page at all. Ignoring that, such a claim deems Cohen the perfectly candidate for another animal-based feature film in which more anthropomorphic creatures might like to try their hands at making mischief, getting into “scrapes”, and occasionally rapping if there’s time that needs filling.

Cohen will be joined by ex-Marvel Chairman David Maisel, who will be taking an exective producer’s role for this brave venture.

“With John’s hands-on producer background and David’s expertise in establishing and running his own successful studio, these two are the dream team for making a movie outside the studio system,” said Rovio CEO Mikael Hed, speaking out about the future collaboration.

Now all Rovio need to do, of course, is keep people into Angry Birds for the next four years. Given the highly complex nature of the app and its continued cultural relevance – not to mention its keen political observations and noteworthy dissections on avian/pig relations – that shouldn’t prove to be difficult at all.

Source: The Guardian


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