The Mummy Cast Photo Finds Tom Cruise In Namibia

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The Mummy Cast Photo Finds Tom Cruise In Namibia

There’s a surprising amount riding on Universal’s reboot of The Mummy, a consequence of the potentially never-ending shared-universe craze Hollywood has locked itself into. A reintroduction to the iconic movie villain, the blockbuster will also set up a world that can comfortably fit all manner of other famed monsters, from the Creature from the Black Lagoon to the Invisible Man.

Luckily, the actors in tow for this pic, to be directed by Alex Kurtzman, seem to be having a blast despite the pressure. A new photo tweeted from lead actress Annabelle Wallis’  account finds her alongside Tom Cruise, Jake Johnson and Courtney B. Vance, all of whom are taking on lead roles in the film opposite Sofia Boutella’s wrapped menace. All of them are clad in fatigues while on set in Namibia, Africa, a handy reminder that the movie is taking a more grounded, modern approach to its oft-campy subject.

Russell Crowe also appears in The Mummy as Dr. Henry Jekyll, setting up at least one obvious spinoff for his dual-natured character. Javier Bardem has also recently been cast as Frankenstein’s monster, so it’s possible – if perhaps not particularly likely – that he’ll show up in this first franchise entry as well. One encouraging sign: Jon Spaihts, who knows something about juggling shared universes thanks to his Doctor Strange script for Marvel, is behind the screenplay.

Here’s the vague synopsis for The Mummy:

Thought safely entombed in a crypt deep beneath the unforgiving desert, an ancient queen whose destiny was unjustly taken from her, is awakened in our current day, bringing with her malevolence grown over millennia and terrors that defy human comprehension.

From the sweeping sands of the Middle East through hidden labyrinths under modern-day London, The Mummy brings a surprising intensity and balance of wonder and thrills in an imaginative new take that ushers in a new world of gods and monsters.

The pic opens June 9, 2017.

Source: Collider