Zack Snyder Has Plans To Adapt Ayn Rand’s The Fountainhead


Zack Snyder Has Plans To Adapt Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead

You’ve got to wonder if Zack Snyder ever takes vacations. The man largely responsible for bringing Warner Bros.’ Extended Universe to life – along with his producing partner Deborah Snyder – never seems to take a break. Straight after locking down the final cut on Batman V Superman, he jetted off to London to start prepping for Justice League Part 1, and afterwards he’ll probably dive into Part 2. So what’s next?

Interestingly enough, Snyder spoke to THR about the projects on his upcoming slate. And they’re nothing to do with superheroes:

“We have The Last Photograph that I’ve been working on for a long time. It’s a small, sort of weird project about a war photogra­pher in Afghanistan. I have been working on The Fountainhead. I’ve always felt like The Fountainhead was such a thesis on the creative process and what it is to create something. Warner Bros. owns [Ayn Rand’s] script and I’ve just been working on that a little bit.”

Zack Snyder is working on Ayn Rand’s The Fountainhead. There’s a sentence I didn’t think I’d write when I got out of bed this morning. This is a total swerve, thematically and stylistically, for Snyder. He cut his teeth on commercials before launching Warner’s superhero domain, so venturing into the realm of Rand’s ego-driven objectivism is quite the diversion. As for the script he refers to, it could be a version penned by the author that Warner kept in its vaults, or the screenplay from the 1949 adaptation.

With regards to the story, The Fountainhead follows an architect named Howard Roark who battles against the traditional views in his workplace to bring about a modern era of architecture. There’s more to it than that, as the novel served as a platform for Rand’s own political rhetoric that favors the individual over the collective.

In short: ‘I am more important that us.’ It’s a complex matter, anyhow, that I won’t delve farther into here. But the fact that Snyder wants to tackle it is just an intriguing as the book itself. That’s just me. though – what do you think about it?

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