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Jurassic Park

Jurassic Park, for many, is a film that captured the heart and imagination like no other. Steven Spielberg's groundbreaking romp through the titular theme park both delighted and terrified audiences back in the summer of 1993 and went on to become one of the highest grossing films of all-time, and deservedly so. It presented an awe-inspiring and thrilling adventure unlike anything that we had ever seen before, and its cultural significance cannot be ignored. Of course, the big draw here is the dinos themselves, and in the below gallery, you can take a better look at just what went into creating these larger than life creatures and how exactly Spielberg brought his breathtaking vision to the big screen. [gallery link="file" ids="428318,428319,428320,428321,428322,428323,428324,428325,428326,428327,428328,428329,428330,428331,428332,428333,428334,428335,428336,428337,428338,428339,428340,429687,429688,429689,429690,429691,429692,429693,429694"]

Blade Runner

Ridley Scott's classic sci-fi, Blade Runner, was actually a bit of a dud upon release. However, in the time since, it's gone onto become one of the most important films ever made and is often regarded as one of the genre's most impressive achievements. One of the things that really helped Blade Runner succeed was the incredible world that Scott created on screen. With fantastic production values throughout and impressive visuals assaulting us constantly, the director brought his vision of a futuristic Los Angeles to life in stunning fashion, allowing us to become fully immersed in the story that was being told. In the gallery below, you'll see some of the models that aided Scott in creating such a fascinating world, as well as some behind the scenes shots of the cast acting out a few of the film's more iconic scenes. It only scratches the surface of what went into bringing this world to life, but still it's an interesting look at the timeless movie. [gallery link="file" ids="428854,428855,428857,428858,428859,428860,428861,428862,428863,428864,428866,428867,428869,428870,428871,428872,428873,428874,428875,428876,428877,428878,429700,429701,429702,429703,429704"]

Alien

Like Blade Runner, Alien is another movie that cemented director Ridley Scott's status as a legendary filmmaker and ensured him a place amongst the greats. It's the perfect blend of sci-fi and horror and featured one of the most iconic female protagonists in the history of cinema: Sigourney Weaver's Ellen Ripley. The definitive behind the scenes look at this film, and its sequels, definitely comes in the form of the Blu-Ray box set, but that doesn't mean we can't get any insight into the production with a couple of entertaining behind the scenes images, right? On that note, here's a gallery of some great shots that we've found around the web, featuring Scott, Weaver and numerous other cast and crew members. Enjoy! [gallery link="file" ids="428879,428880,428881,428882,428883,428885,428886,428887,428888,428889,428890,428891,428892,428893,428894,428895,428896,428897,428898,428899,428900,428901,430327,430328,430329,430330,430331,430332,430333,430334,430335,430336,430337,430338,430339,430340,430341"]

Jaws

Before he made Jurassic Park, Steve Spielberg brought another terrifying creature to the big screen with Jaws. The film that many people credit with making them too scared to go back in the water, Jaws took Hollywood, and the moviegoing public by storm back when it hit theatres in 1975. Crucial in creating and then establishing Hollywood's current business model when it comes to blockbusters, there's a lot to admire about this movie and it still, to this day, stands as one of the most thrilling open water adventures ever committed to celluloid. [gallery link="file" ids="428839,428840,428842,428843,428844,428846,428847,428848,428849,428850,428851,429712,429713,429714,429715,429716,429717,429718,429719,429720,429721,429722"]

The Avengers

In 2012, Marvel did the impossible. With the help of Joss Whedon, and a game cast (Robert Downey Jr., Mark Ruffalo, Chris Evans, Samuel L. Jackson etc.), the studio successfully pulled off a superhero team-up film that many thought would be near impossible. And not only did they pull it off, but they absolutely knocked it out of the park, providing us with one of the most exciting entries into the genre in some time. Of course, producing a gigantic film of such epic proportions is no easy feat, and in the gallery below, you'll get a look at Whedon and his crew trying to put The Avengers together. From green screen battles to the director coaching his cast, the behind the scenes images we have for you here will definitely excite anyone who counts themselves as a Marvel fan. [gallery link="file" ids="428908,428909,428910,428911,428912,428913,428914,428915,428916,428917,428918,428919,428920,428921,428922,428923,428924,428925,428926,428927,429695,429697,429698,429699"]" ["post_title"]=> string(88) "Incredible Behind The Scenes Photos From Star Wars, Jurassic Park, The Avengers And More" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(368) "Often, what you see on a screen when it comes to Hollywood blockbusters is not at all what the initial footage looked like. Whether it's CGI, practical effects, models, costumes, make-up or any of the other numerous tactics employed to create movie magic, the finished product is almost always enhanced in some manner, especially when it comes to these types of films." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(63) "behind-scenes-photos-star-wars-alien-blade-runner-avengers-jaws" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-05-21 13:56:24" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-21 18:56:24" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=428312" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#390 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(388323) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "433" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-05-18 17:00:25" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-18 22:00:25" ["post_content"]=> string(10613) "Avengers: Age of Ultron is now in theaters and in typical Marvel fashion, it's opened the floodgates for speculation on what's coming next in the sprawling and ever-expanding cinematic universe. Next on the docket is Ant-Man in July, but since that film appears to stand alone from the rest of the Phase Two entries and have little impact on the MCU as a whole, our eyes are set on Marvel's next big team-up, 2016's Captain America: Civil War Civil War has been teased as Avengers 2.5, as it involves many of the franchise's biggest characters and will act as a major jumping off point for several Phase Three storylines like Black Panther and, of course, both Avengers: Infinity War installments. Age of Ultron managed to not only tell a big crossover story, but lay the groundwork for future Marvel films and set the wheels in motion for Civil War. As such, it left us with several burning questions, six of which we've decided to investigate further in the following pages. So, without further ado, here are six big Captain America: Civil War questions that were left by Avengers: Age of Ultron...

6) What's Next For The Hulk?

Hulk One of the biggest lingering plot threads from Age of Ultron is the fate of Bruce Banner, who was last seen piloting a quinjet away from Sokovia. It's worth noting that he did this while still in Hulk mode, though he did it calmly, as if he was in control of the big green rage monster. We knew that Bruce had a good handle on his transformations (thanks to the "I'm always angry" line in The Avengers), but this is one giant leap toward coexistence that unfortunately went unexplained. We know why Bruce took off in the jet without telling anyone where he was going: he knows that he's a danger those around him, and after the events of the film (especially his very destructive African rampage), he decided to distance himself from Black Widow and the rest of the team. The only question that remains is where did he go and what's next? While Mark Ruffalo is not yet confirmed to appear in Captain America: Civil War, he did recently hint that he'll be smashing his way back to the MCU with the rest of Earth's Mightiest Heroes when that film hits next May. If he does come back, what role will he play? Will we merely touch base with him, or will he come out of hiding to join sides with Tony Stark or Steve Rogers? It was recently confirmed that The Incredible Hulk's William Hurt will return as General "Thunderbolt" Ross, could he be spending his bit of screentime hunting down the Hulk once more? It doesn't look like we'll be getting to Planet Hulk anytime soon (if at all), so right now, the sky literally is the limit for what's next for the big green guy.

5) What's Going On With S.H.I.E.L.D.?

SHIELD When last we saw S.H.I.E.L.D. on the big screen, it had been taken down by Cap, Black Widow, Falcon and Nick Fury in order to eradicate HYDRA, which had slowly taken over the organization from the inside after World War II. While S.H.I.E.L.D. is still alive and well on Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. with Coulson at its head, nothing on the television series has managed to make it to the big screen, leaving a big question mark over the current status of the once-powerful organization. In what may amount to be one of the biggest moments of deus ex machina in film history, Nick Fury is seen arriving in a S.H.I.E.L.D. helicarrier just as Sokovia needs to be evacuated, with Maria Hill and a team of S.H.I.E.L.D. agents ready to lend a hand. What does this mean for the organization going forward? Will it rise once more, and take prominence in Civil War? Would the world (and Steve Rogers) even trust S.H.I.E.L.D. after the events of The Winter Soldier? Only time will tell.

4) Will We See A Vision/Scarlet Witch Romance?

vision-and-the-scarlet-witch_1 Age of Ultron contains a very subtle hint of a future romance between Scarlet Witch and the Vision, as the newborn android whisks the new Avenger to safety during the climactic Sokovia battle. It probably means nothing to casual audiences, but comic book readers know that it may be a seed that blossoms into the full-blown romance that the two share in the comics. Will moviegoers accept such a romance if it were to unfold on screen? The Vision has emerged as an audience favorite, meaning that people have already accepted him for what he is. Adding a romance on top of his already high-concept existence probably wouldn't do too much damage and could actually add some depth to his character by showing his conflicting human and robotic sides. Hell, if people were accepting of a Hulk/Black Widow pairing, then why couldn't this work?

3) Where Is The Winter Soldier?

Winter Soldier Speaking of The Winter Soldier, where is that eponymous assassin, anyway? During Age of Ultron's Avengers Tower party scene, Falcon informs Cap that he's still working on his "missing persons case," meaning that he's been looking for Bucky while Cap and the rest of the Avengers have been shutting down HYDRA outposts. When last we saw him, Bucky was visiting the Smithsonian's Captain America exhibit. Where did he go from there? And better yet, how does he fit into Civil War? It's a question that we didn't expect answered in Age of Ultron, but one burning question that the film left us with all the same.

2) Will Destruction In Age Of Ultron Act As A Civil War Catalyst?

Age of Ultron We know that the catalyst for Civil War will be the initiation of the Superhero Registration Act, which causes the Avengers to split into two factions as Tony Stark and Steve Rogers stand on opposite sides of the issue. What we don't know is what causes the law to go into motion in the first place, though one viewing of Age of Ultron provides quite a few clues. Like Man of Steel, Age of Ultron features a lot of collateral damage at the hands of the titular heroes. And, like Man of Steel's sequel, Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice, Captain America: Civil War will deal with the fallout and aftermath of that destruction head on. Judging by what's been happening in the MCU for the last few installments, the world probably isn't happy with the Avengers and feels threatened by the sudden emergence of powerful threats and devastating superhero battles. The Invasion of New York, the fall of S.H.I.E.L.D., Hulk's rampage in Africa and Sokovia's destruction are all big, world-changing events that force ordinary citizens to ask tough questions of those who've sworn to protect them. So, really, it's inevitable that the world's governments would take action. Hulk's African rampage could also be part of what draws Black Panther into the fray; the Avengers were close to Wakanda at the time (while on the hunt for Ulysses Klaw and his vibranium), so could T'Challa come out of the woodwork because they brought the fight so close to home?

1) Which Sides Do The Avengers Choose?

is-captain-america-3-civil-war-a-bad-idea-or-is-avengers-3-better-marvel-civil-war-poster The biggest question about Civil War is not what causes the big rift in the team, but what factions the Avengers will divide into once it happens. At the end of Age of Ultron, the team roster had shifted dramatically, as Cap and Black Widow are the only two original members still active. Tony Stark has unplugged himself from the Iron Man suit (for now), Thor has returned to Asgard (where he'll likely stay while Civil War takes place, as he prepares for Thor: Ragnarok), Hawkeye has gone back to his family and the Hulk is on the lam. In their place are the Vision, Scarlet Witch, War Machine and Falcon. Once Cap and Iron man face off, however, who will join who? Black Widow will likely stay loyal to Cap, as will Falcon, but Rhodey (an officer in the military, mind you) will probably take Tony's side. Hawkeye, Vision and Scarlet Witch are wildcards, as is Black Panther, who will make his debut in Civil War (and will reportedly face off with Hawkeye, meaning they're probably not on the same side). Since Age of Ultron ends on a bit of a happy note, it's anyone's guess as to which sides our Avengers will choose once the chips fall. And if the other 11 films in Marvel's library are any indication, we're in for quite a few surprises when Civil War hits theaters on May 6th, 2016." ["post_title"]=> string(76) "6 Captain America: Civil War Questions That Avengers: Age Of Ultron Left Us " ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(65) "6-captain-america-civil-war-questions-left-by-avengers-age-ultron" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-05-19 09:25:49" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-19 14:25:49" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=388323" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#389 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(421682) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "496" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-05-18 16:48:12" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-18 21:48:12" ["post_content"]=> string(11315) "rebootsIncredibleHulk As the old saying goes: If you don't succeed at first, then try, try again. This is a life lesson that Hollywood has taken aboard through years of film history - unfortunately to the public's detriment on more than one occasion. Reboots, sequels and remakes have become a recognizable stamp of American cinema, with Hollywood having been consistently preoccupied with rehashing dependable and bankable old ideas to keep the money rolling in - even if the subsequent critical reception has been lukewarm to say the least. Indeed, if you're a Hollywood producer, the old saying is probably something more like: If you do succeed at first, then try, try again anyway... Fortunately though, when it comes to the movie reboot, there have been some merciful crumbs of comfort - especially in the comic book world. No doubt there have been a fair few duds, but thankfully, success has been found on more than one occasion. Listed here are 5 comic book reboots that actually worked and worked rather well. Check them out and be sure to sound off in the comments section letting us know whether or not you were a fan of any of these films.

5) Dredd

rebootsdredd Some people consider the original Judge Dredd to be a slice of trashy guilty pleasure pie; greedily and unabashedly tucking in when it pops up on television on account of the fact that Sylvester Stallone plays his law enforcement operator deadpan whilst chuckling on the inside. It doesn't matter whether Stallone was in on the joke or not, quite frankly, because the first Judge Dredd sucked and acted only as a wasted opportunity to represent the chaotic, imaginative, dystopian world of Mega-City One from the comic book series. Dredd, on the other hand, achieves the kind of entertaining effect that the original couldn't muster. Pete Travis' reboot drops the noun from the title and cooks up an explosive screenplay with a dark comic streak wriggling through its center, offering up some eye-popping special-effects to illuminate the crumbling surroundings of a fallen Planet Earth. Karl Urban's snarl provides a more compelling presence than Stallone's grisly gurgle and the remake knows exactly what it's doing, compared to its predecessor, which was distinctly confused from start to finish. Whilst both movies pride themselves on portrayal of an overtly ugly setting, the reboot surpasses the original through its gorgeously orchestrated cinematography. Dredd leaves us to marvel at the monstrous surroundings of Mega-City One with silky slow-motion graphics, whereas the dullness of Judge Dredd stirred a desire in critics to get out of their seats and wipe the screen clean (to help break the tedium as well as remove the ugliness). Dredd might have looked good compared to Stallone's star vehicle even if it were a distinctly average blockbuster, but in actuality, it's a pretty decent watch - combining the best tropes of the action B-movie with some terrific special effects.

4) X-Men: First Class

X-menfirstclass Technically a prequel as opposed to a reboot in the conventional sense of the term, X-Men: First Class nonetheless conducts a colorful re-imagining of a wide collection of superhero characters, who after two decent sequels had begun to teeter on the verge of turning stale. Matthew Vaughn's prequel flick provides a welcome, fresh perspective on the series, taking the main characters of X-Men and investigating their intriguing origins by using an alternative ensemble cast. X-Men: First Class provides audiences with some thoroughly intriguing backstories and aptly quenches fans' insatiable thirst for knowledge about how these special members of society came to be. The movie is stylishly directed by Vaughn from beginning to end, with the filmmaker recruiting a perfect cast that fit their roles nicely - including Michael Fassbender as the increasingly bitter Magneto and James McAvoy as a youthful Charles Xavier. The movie keeps them all in check, too, and retains credibility by never allowing the characters to wander too distantly from the particular personality traits of the mutants that they eventually become. Fast, furious and frenetic, X-Men: First Class is a prequel that works - rebooting the colorful supermutants in a way that makes their youth arguably even more enthralling than their adulthood.

3) The Incredible Hulk

rebootsThe-Incredible-Hulk-HD-Wallpaper Whilst you should never judge a book by its cover, there are times when a title can tell you all that you need to know about a movie. The film adaptations of Bruce Banner's alter ego are a prime example of these rare occasions. Ang Lee's 2003 film - simply named Hulk - is for long periods about as dull, blatant and uninspired as its title. On the other hand, Louis Letterier's reboot has a slightly more alluring name given the presence of an adjective that hints towards an experience beyond belief, and whilst the movie itself may not exactly be "incredible," it has more to offer audiences than its predecessor does - both in name and content. Neither Hulk franchise provides a glorious cinematic experience or does complete justice to its source material, but the 2008 reboot just seems to have more liveliness about it than Lee's rendition that was released five year prior. Some may prefer the original given how Lee makes such a conscious effort to capture the psychological condition of Banner, but simply put, the director just takes far too long going about it. Even some of the action sequences feel overlong, with the big green monster thudding, clod-hopping and springing around the screen for exhausting periods of time. Letterier's reboot - whilst by no means flawless - works for the most part given its sense of urgency and excitement. It's this enthusiastic style of filmmaking that gives credit to what initially appeared to be an utterly pointless reboot, and allows it to even surpass its predecessor in terms of quality.

2) The Amazing Spider-Man

rebootspidey Alright, so to claim that everything about the latest Spider-Man franchise has really worked may be overreaching, and this author in particular was skeptical about another trio of web-spinning movies being green-lit before Tobey Maguire had even finished clambering out of his red-and-blue rubber suit. But there's no denying that the latest Spidey franchise certainly has its own unique charm, despite the second installment being somewhat overstuffed. What has been quite so refreshing about the latest Spider-Man reboot is how the movies have a confident sense of humor about themselves without ever going overboard into campy territory. Spidey has been transformed into the kind of wise-cracking superhero who was such a hoot in the cartoon series of the nineties, and we're left to laugh with him as he mocks the absurdity of any situation he finds himself in. Andrew Garfield is a good fit for the role, turning the timid Peter Parker of the previous franchise into a self-confident superhero with hubris. The latest franchise is - in some ways - a little closer to its comic book origins (such as Spidey using web-shooting wrist cannons rather than sticky goo bursting from his fingertips), and whilst Sam Raimi's Spider-Man trilogy was undeniably entertaining, there is certainly something to be said for Marc Webb's reboot. Whilst a healthy platform appeared to be set for a thrilling finale film, recent news suggests that The Amazing Spider-Man 3 will no longer take place, with Spidey instead being set for yet another reboot to become part of the expanded Marvel universe. Will audiences get sick of the web-slinger adopting so many different forms though?

1) Batman

rebootsbatman_begins-HD The quintessential comic book reboot that all others ought to turn to for inspiration, Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight trilogy has earned its place in film history and stands aloft as perhaps the greatest superhero franchise of all-time. Batman has come a long way since Adam West pranced around in a skin-tight costume and badly-fitted mask, and the star of the sixties show might have cowered behind the sofa upon seeing his campy persona so ferociously ripped apart when Christian Bale roared onto the screen. Yet, the famous DC comic book character was forced to endure a series of turbulent and peculiar portrayals on his journey from cheesy small-screen combat to the affective, brooding movies released in the new millennium. In 1989 and 1992, Michael Keaton donned the batsuit for an intimidatingly gloomy rendition of the comic book antihero, steered by an individual who specializes as a main advocate for the dark and the peculiar - Tim Burton. The two movies, Batman and Batman Returns were dark, haunted pictures that alienated a younger audience and those adverse to violence, but they got something right in how they made the world of Gotham appear so conflicted and tormented. The next film in the series, Batman Forever saw a distinct movement towards the campy end of the spectrum, and by the time the curtain came down on the franchise with Batman & Robin, the series had fallen right back into cheesy 60's Tv territory once again - only this time with an overabundance of special effects swamping the screen. It wasn't until 2005 that the character of Batman really got the film that he deserved. Nolan's reboot redefined the possibilities and limits of the comic book movie - weaving a magnetic, multi-layered narrative through a series of explosive action sequences that never overshadowed the storyline or cast. The trilogy brings the binary opposition of good vs. evil into disrepute, daring to throw its hero into a moral grey area that provides the pictures with complexity and depth. Gloriously entertaining from beginning to end, The Dark Knight trilogy remains one of the most enthralling comic book reboots ever." ["post_title"]=> string(45) "5 Comic Book Movie Reboots That Really Worked" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(666) "As the old saying goes: If you don't succeed at first, then try, try again. This is a life lesson that Hollywood has taken aboard through years of film history - unfortunately to the public's detriment on more than one occasion. Reboots, sequels and remakes have become a recognizable stamp of American cinema, with Hollywood having been consistently preoccupied with rehashing dependable and bankable old ideas to keep the money rolling in - even if the subsequent critical reception has been lukewarm to say the least. Indeed, if you're a Hollywood producer, the old saying is probably something more like: If you do succeed at first, then try, try again anyway..." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(27) "5-comic-book-reboots-worked" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-05-18 16:22:16" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-18 21:22:16" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=421682" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#388 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(428754) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "496" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-05-18 14:48:43" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-18 19:48:43" ["post_content"]=> string(9946) "comic5 Rightly or wrongly, when the phrase "comic book movie" gets banded about, it's all too easy to conjure up memories of Superman powering through clear blue skies, Spider-Man springing his way between toppling skyscrapers, or Batman roaring his way through traffic in his devastating bat-mobile. Comic book powerhouses Marvel and DC have come to represent the genre as whole in modern society, and whilst there is much joy to be found in their respective worlds, it's important to remember that the comic book category is far more dense and complex than many people would have you believe. So, on that note, we've decided to look back on 5 excellent films that you probably didn't know were originally created in comic book form.

5) Men In Black

comic1 That's right - the surreptitious alien crime-fighting organization who wear shades in the winter actually started off in print form way back in 1990. Written by Lowell Cunningham, the espionage comic strip was eventually incorporated by Marvel and transformed into a classic American blockbuster in 1997, proving to be an exuberant success and spawning two subsequent sequels. Cunningham's comic may have inspired the paranormal setting and black suit attire for Barry Sonnenfeld's movie adaptation, but the somber, dark, disturbing tones of the series were substituted for goofy humor during the transition from page to screen in order to cater for a wider Hollywood audience. True, touches of depravity do exist in the MIB movie - and Vincent D'Onofrio's gargling performance as an alien cockroach stuffed inside human skin might just be enough to terrify some viewers. But for the most part, the picture is jauntily carried along by the dynamic humor of the odd couple protagonists - with Will Smith starring as the frantic, fish-out-of-water newbie, and partner Tommy Lee Jones playing deadpan as the hardened, steely veteran. The original comic strip only actually ran for six issues, but was more expansive than the movie it inspired given how the agents in question dealt with wider areas of paranormal activity, including zombies and demons. Taking a look a the comics really is worth it for anyone who found MIB to be a fun experience (and who didn't?), but be warned: those expecting a tongue-in-cheek to-and-fro between Agents K and J will be disappointed. Not only is Agent K essentially sadistic in the comic book series, but he appears to regard J as little more than cannon fodder in his quest to wipe out evil earth activity. Not exactly family-friendly stuff.

4) Blue Is The Warmest Color

comic2 After scooping the prestigious Palme D'or award from the Cannes Film Festival in 2013, Blue Is The Warmest Color became a subject of severe scrutiny by film scholars and critics, who lauded its female-focused approach, welcomed a new talent in Tunisian director Abdellatif Kechiche, and provided expansive commentary on the significance of the controversial sex sequences that had certain audiences members up in arms. The fact that Blue Is The Warmest Color was based on a French graphic novel from 2010 largely became lost amid the movie's intense reception, and Julie Maroh's source material was pushed briefly aside in the melee as every critic clambered to throw in their own two cents' worth on the movie's themes. Perhaps another reason that Maroh's graphic novel was glossed over by some was due to the fact that director Keciche uses the same characters to transform the movie into something a little different from the book that inspired it. The movie and book are set in slightly different eras, which creates noteworthy distinctions given the all-encompassing theme of homosexuality. After all, the further you go back, the less accepting society appears to be with regards to same sex relationships. As such, the particulars of the relationship between the two young female leads differs between graphic novel and film, but the main themes of love, longing and discovery remain safely intact. Blue Is The Warmest Color will forever be the first comic book adaptation to win a Palme D'or, and for that reason alone its source material deserves wider attention. You may be startled by the differences in third act across the alternative forms of media, but with both the film and the novel, all the key ingredients are there for fine, deeply affecting work that's worthy of your time.

3) Oldboy

animals6 A sizeable portion of film fans may be aware that Spike Lee's 2013 movie Oldboy is an American remake of Park Chan-wook's South Korean movie of the same name,  but fewer may be familiar with the fact that Chan-wook himself adopted the screenplay from a Japanese manga series released during the mid-nineties. Indeed, the influence of Garon Tsuchiya's comic book appears to have no bounds, having also inspired a Bollywood movie (directed by Sanjay Gupta) entitled Zinda in 2006. Each of the Oldboy adaptations depict a male protagonist who is hurtled into a cell and mysteriously held captive for a number years. Suddenly released, he plots to find the men who imprisoned him and swears revenge. Differences do exist between the manga strip and the film adaptations (with Spike Lee's version subject to an inevitable degree of Americanization), but given how Oldboy unfolds in such a calculated way, it'd be foolish to reveal them. Regardless, whichever version you decide to take in, don't expect a pleasant pain-free ride. Or a chirpy, uplifting ending for that matter.

2) A History Of Violence

comic3 David Cronmenberg's bizarre and twisted filmography contains some of the most warped and imaginative works of cinema ever beamed up to the big screen, yet his 2005 flick A History Of Violence turned heads for a different reason. Not only did this movie represent a departure from a filmography that largely teetered on the fringes of the avant-garde into more conventional territory, but it also saw the director draw on source material that existed originally in the form of a graphic novel penned by Judge Dredd writer John Wagner. Whilst A History Of Violence can be considered a less hallucinatory-like experience than the director's previous works (aesthetically speaking), the psychologically damaged characters and themes that haunt Cronenbergian cinema remain unmistakably apparent. Viggo Mortenson plays the owner of small town diner named Tom in Indiana, and is lauded as a local hero after swiftly gunning down two men who attempt to rob his restaurant. This act of violence sees Tom's life begin to slowly unravel, as men claiming to be from his past approach his home and demand that he returns to the life that he left behind. Whilst certain scenes do bear a close resemblance to Wagner's comic book from, Cronenberg's film unsurprisingly veers off into more desolate, thornier territory than its source material. In print form, A History Of Violence can be recognized as a noir crime thriller, whereas in live-action film clothing it asks many more questions about the nature of the act of violence itself. Both media forms of A History Of Violence are worth investigating, albeit for very different experiences.

1) Kingsman: The Secret Service

[ctv-1] If the thought of Colin Firth starring as an eloquent secret agent with a ruthless set of combat skills and swanky gadgets wasn't stunning enough, the fact that the whole premise for Kingsman: The Secret Service has roots in the comic book world may well raise a few eyebrows instead. Writers Mark Millar and Dave Gibbons penned the spy comic series as recently as 2012, and director Matthew Vaughn - a man who is all too familiar with the colorful comic book world, having steered Kick-Ass and X-Men: First Class - promptly hopped aboard the film adaptation when it was green-lit at the end of that same year. Huge actors occasionally hit a point when they are prepared to  step out of the comfort zone that's performed as a magnet for awards. Without knowledge of the comic book world, it might be easy to mistake Kingsman as a vehicle exclusively written for Firth to re-tune his image and showcase his willingness to try his hand at action-comedy. In reality, this goofball espionage flick does have a strong place in print, and whilst the film adaptation doesn't faithfully recreate everything about Millar and Gibbons' comic book, it pays tribute to its source material by keeping the same sense of kooky humor that made the novel such a page-turner. The stars all shine, the action is slick, and for the most part, the whole thing is a hell of a lot of fun. It's not a carbon copy of its comic book origins by any means, but Vaughn is a safe pair of hands when it comes to comic book-style movies, and pretty much everyone should find something to like about Kingsman." ["post_title"]=> string(68) "5 Hit Movies That You Probably Didn't Know Were Based On Comic Books" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(293) "Rightly or wrongly, when the phrase "comic book movie" gets banded about, it's all too easy to conjure up memories of Superman powering through clear blue skies, Spider-Man springing his way between toppling skyscrapers, or Batman roaring his way through traffic in his devastating bat-mobile." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(30) "5-hit-movies-based-comic-books" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-05-24 16:21:35" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-24 21:21:35" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=428754" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#387 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(426856) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "478" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-05-18 13:00:43" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-18 18:00:43" ["post_content"]=> string(11283) "Deadpool It's hard to imagine now, but can you remember a time when talking racoons and Asgardian gods didn't rule the box office, a time when Robert Downey Jr. wasn't a bankable star and Christopher Reeves was the only Superman worth thinking about? Superhero movies have become the dominant force in Hollywood lately and the trend seems set to stay for the foreseeable future. At the time of writing, Marvel and DC alone have roughly thirty movies scheduled for release from now until 2020, and that number could easily hit the thousands by the time this list is published. Anyone ready for a Howard the Duck trilogy? These days, it seems like the only jobs left available to Hollywood actors are superhero roles, so it makes sense that some have tackled numerous comic book characters in a bid to keep their servants clothed and fed. Join us as we check out 8 actors who have played multiple superheroes during their time in the spotlight and feel free to let us know which role was the better one in the comments section.

8) Halle Berry (Storm/Catwoman)

HalleBerryCatwoman Halle Berry has proven herself to be a talented actress in movies such as Monsters Ball and... yeah. Monsters Ball. What was I saying? Ah yes. Despite winning an Oscar for her impressive turn in the aforementioned film, Berry is arguably more famous for her work in commercial fare such as Catwoman and the X-Men franchise. This is unfortunate, as both roles probably made the Academy reconsider giving Berry an award in the first place. From that 'toad' line in the first X-Men to just about every single moment of Catwoman, Berry hasn't had much luck when it comes to superheroes, which is particularly unfortunate as there's a huge lack of diversity in these roles at the moment. Still pining for the Black Widow movie that will never happen? Blame the Catwoman film. It's just easier that way. Best Role: Storm

7) Ellen Page (Shadowcat/Boltie)

Ellen-Page-SUPER-smaller-2 In contrast to Halle Berry, Ellen Page was nominated for an Oscar, but never won, which probably explains why the pint-sized actress is still capable of actually making good movies. Page's most famous superhero part is the role of Kitty Pryde, a mutant who can move through solid objects and apparently send people back in time. X-Men: Days of Future Past may have been a great movie, but the plot itself contains more holes than the Human Centipede. Page's role in the indie Super may be less familiar to mainstream audiences, but fans who have actually seen James Gunn's movie will find it hard to forget Boltie, the deranged comic book store clerk who joins the Crimson Bolt on his crusade. Anyone who thought Page was cute or charming in Juno needs to watch Super, just to see the psychotic depths that her character reaches. Also, that costume! Best Role: Boltie

6) Ryan Reynolds (Green Lantern/Deadpool)

marvel3deadpool-waving-new-concept-art-hints-at-a-very-different-deadpool Amidst all the excitement and hype for Fox's upcoming Deadpool flick, it's easy to forget just how terribly the character was treated in X-Men Origins: Wolverine. We all know it was bad, but I implore you to watch it again. Seriously. You'll be surprised at the lengths your brain will go to forget painful events. It's even worse than you remember. Trust me. Unfortunately, the same could also be said of Ryan Reynold's turn in the Green Lantern movie which DC are keen to forget ever existed. Admittedly, Reynolds wasn't terrible in the role of Hal Jordan, but when armed with a script that forced GL to fight a giant space cloud, what can you do? Let's just hope the new Deadpool is successful so that we never have to see Reynolds don that horrendous emerald CGI costume ever again. My eyes can only take so much punishment. Best Role: Deadpool... hopefully.

5) Nicolas Cage (Ghost Rider/Big Daddy/Superman)

Ghost-Rider-Spirit-of-Vengeance-2012-Movie-Image-600x312 Falling under the rare category of actors 'so bad, they're good,' Nicolas Cage has delighted audiences with his genuinely insane performances for decades now, so of course, a few superhero roles have come his way in that time. For a man who's pissed actual fire as Ghost Rider and starred in a doomed Superman project, it seems odd that Cage's part as Big Daddy in the film Kick-Ass is probably his least insane superhero role yet. Batman character parodies are far less strange than a skeleton motorcyclist and a dodgy Superman wig, right? Right!? The strangest thing about all of this though is that Kick-Ass was actually a hit for Nicolas Cage, something that has escaped his CV for quite some time now... unless you count The Wicker Man remake of course. Funniest movie ever made. Best Role: Big Daddy

4) Aaron Taylor-Johnson (Kick-Ass/Quicksilver)

Quicksilver-Age-of-Ultron Nicolas Cage isn't the only Kick-Ass star to appear in another superhero movie. Seems that Kick-Ass himself somehow developed actual super powers along the way, joining the Avengers in the fight against Ultron. However, while Kick-Ass was a breath of fresh air in a genre already overcrowded with CGI enhanced heroes, Taylor-Johnson's Quicksilver appeared in the wake of Evan Peter's version of the character in X-Men: Days of Future Past. Despite rocking a silver mullet and weird ass goggles, Peter's Quicksilver wowed audiences with an incredible slow-motion action sequence that became the defining moment in Days of Future Past. Taylor Johnson's Quicksilver had a lot to live up to, but even if his version had appeared first, the character would have still been upstaged by his onscreen sister, the Scarlet Witch. Maybe if the two had hooked up like they do in the comics, Johnson's version could have been more memorable... Best Role: Kick-Ass

3) Samuel L. Jackson (Frozone/Nick Fury)

marvels-agents-of-shield-samuel-l-jackson-as-nick-fury An actor as theatrical as Samuel L. Jackson was always destined to appear in superhero movies, so it shouldn't have come as a surprise when he took on the role of Nick Fury in every bloody Marvel film ever made, even to those who expected a grizzled white actor in his fifties Jackson has become an integral part of the MCU over the past decade, but the movie that kickstarted his sojourn into super heroics was the Pixar classic The Incredibles. Mr Incredible may have been the star of the film, but Jackson's icy hero Frozone stole every scene he was in. The actor recently confirmed that Frozone is set to appear in the upcoming Incredibles sequel, which could quite possibly be the best news ever. After the debacle that was Cars 2, it's exciting news that Pixar are willing to produce a sequel that audiences will actually care about, especially one that features Mr Jackson himself. Best Role: Frozone

2) Ben Affleck (Daredevil/Batman)

Ben-Affleck-Batman-in-color Few actors have experienced the extreme highs and lows of show business like Ben Affleck. From his incredible success in early work such as Good Will Hunting to the astounding success of Argo, it's easy to forget now what a colossal joke the actor became back in the early 2000's. Jennifer Lopez played a huge part in this, obviously, ruining Hollywood in any way possible, but the abysmal Daredevil movie shoulders a large part of the blame, too. Affleck is either the bravest or dumbest actor of his generation, tackling an even more iconic hero for his next huge role. The Dark Knight isn't exactly a safe bet either, as Val Kilmer's post-Batman career can attest to. From the moment that Affleck's casting was announced, trolls who can presumably see into the future have derided Zack Snyder's choice and the entire Batman V Superman venture in general. Either way, Affleck's going to make enough cash to order a hit on every hater out there, so I'm sure he's not too worried. Best Role: We're praying it will be Batman.

1) Chris Evans (Human Torch/Captain America)

chris-evans The eagle-eyed among you may have noticed a pattern by now; Few of the actors on this list actually managed to pull off two convincing superheroes and some even failed to succeed with one. Chris Evans is the rare specimen who defied this trend, excelling as both the Human Torch and Captain America, despite these characters appearing in cinemas within the same decade. What's particularly impressive is that Marvel studios actually gave Evans a crack at the Star-Spangled Avengers after only just starring in the godawful Fantastic Four franchise a few short years before. Sure, it helps that Evans likes to take his top off in movies, but it's also a testament to his star charisma and acting ability. However, Evans has recently expressed reluctance to continue starring in multi-billion dollar franchises for much longer, presumably because of a recently discovered allergy to money, so his days as Captain America may soon be over. Best Role: Captain America" ["post_title"]=> string(45) "8 Actors Who Have Played Multiple Superheroes" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(241) "It's hard to imagine now, but can you remember a time when talking racoons and Asgardian gods didn't rule the box office, a time when Robert Downey Jr. wasn't a bankable star and Christopher Reeves was the only Superman worth thinking about?" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(36) "8-actors-played-multiple-superheroes" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-05-16 14:52:03" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-16 19:52:03" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=426856" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [5]=> object(WP_Post)#386 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(428292) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "506" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-05-14 13:39:35" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-14 18:39:35" ["post_content"]=> string(11758) "Movement-Detroit-3 You can draw a lot of conclusions about a person just by learning that they've bought tickets to Movement Detroit. Think about it: They could have spent that same kind of money going to any of the numerous festivals whose lineups are packed with chart-topping names - but unless they're some kind of serial festivalgoer, they opted instead to attend a massive dedicated to techno, in the obscure genre's gritty birthplace no less. This means one of two things: They're either a seasoned dance music purist whose discerning tastes have been steeped in cramped ‘90s warehouses with sweat dripping from the ceilings, or they're a recent EDM generation transplant ready to eagerly dive down the rabbit hole that is the electronic underground. Since the former wouldn't be caught dead reading anything other than Resident Advisor or Mixmag, we'll take the liberty of assuming that you're the latter. Never to fear, music snob in training, because We Got You Covered has got you... well, covered. As we talked about last week, Movement has released each of its stages’ slot-by-slot lineups and we've been dying for an opportunity to tell you which artists you're supposed to like. Since techno all probably still kind of sounds the same to you (which you definitely shouldn't admit out loud anywhere on or around the festival grounds, by the way), we even sprinkled a few other musical styles into your agenda! The following ten artists are slated to perform sets that you absolutely can't miss if you plan to check out the 2015 edition of Movement Detroit from May 23rd-25th - lest you pass up all the sweet, delicious street cred that taking part in the festivities entitles you.

10) Richie Hawtin

When: Day 1 at 10:00 PM Where: Movement Stage If you’re walking into Hart Plaza on the first night of the festival, Richie Hawtin A.K.A. Plastikman will play as good a set on the Movement Stage as any to kick off your musical journey into the heart of Detroit techno. His name became all but synonymous with the second wave of the genre in the early ‘90s, and his ENTER. events continue to expose new generations to its delightfully dissonant sounds. Just don’t make the rookie mistake of confusing him with Emma Hewitt (who won’t even be playing the festival, silly) - it’s happened to all of us at some point, and it’s hard to recover from it.

9) Carl Craig and “Mad” Mike Banks

When: Day 1 at 10:00 PM Where: Thump Stage If you wander over to the Thump stage next and hear somebody reference “Sandstorms,” know in advance that they’re probably not talking about “Sandstorm” by Darude (or as we like to call it, the “Freebird” of dance music). The former track is a timeless release by the legendary Carl Craig, another second waver who will be joined behind the decks by Underground Resistance label founder “Mad” Mike Banks.

8) Tuskegee (Seth Troxler B2B The Martinez Brothers)

When: Day 1 at 10:30 PM Where: Beatport Stage Even though his particular brand of techno might sound especially sterile to the untrained ear, the amount of time Seth Troxler spends bashing the mainstream gives him more underground credentials than the longest, rattiest beard ever could. Besides, the sexy house sensibilities of Brooklyn-based Martinez Brothers will provide a perfect counterbalance since the two acts will trade off song selection as their group side project, Tuskegee.

7) Maya Jane Coles

When: Day 2 at 7:00 PM Where: Beatport Stage Get to the festival grounds before sundown on the second day, because deep house goddess Maya Jane Coles’ soothing set on the Beatport stage will prepare you for the barrage of clicks and chirps that all the techno selectors will blast into your eardrums over the course of the night. Coles represents a younger segment of the underground, hailing from London where proper house never goes out of style, and her set will definitely be worth catching.

6) Dog Blood (Skrillex and Boys Noize)

When: Day 2 at 10:30 PM Where: Movement Stage If you’re the kind of elitist who opens listicles like these just to pick one bullet and tear it apart in the comments, then congratulations! This is the entry you’ve been looking for. Yes, we’re going to tell you to go out of your way to see Skrillex at a festival full of off-the-beaten-path techno producers - and the reason for that is that he’ll be accompanied by none other than OWSLA mainstay Boys Noize. Long before good ol’ Skrilly Vanilli ever resigned himself to the big, farty trap music that he and Diplo put out as Jack Ü, he brought some electro heat to the techy, breaksy mixes that made Boys Noize famous under the stage name Dog Blood. Trust us, you'll be missing out if you don’t make it to Movement Stage before Midnight on the second day to catch their set.

5) Matador

When: Day 3 at 7:00 PM Where: Underground Stage If you’ve already been at this festival for two days and this is the first time you’re actually making it over to the Underground Stage, then you should be ashamed of yourself. Get over it quickly, though, because you’re gonna want to devote your full attention to what Matador’s fixing to throw down. This Minus record label signee saw early support from the aforementioned Richie Hawtin for his particularly avant-garde style of German techno and promises to be a name to look out for in the years to follow.

4) Maceo Plex

When: Day 3 at 8:30 PM Where: Movement Stage Few contemporary techno artists command the kind of respect that the name Maceo Plex does in the underground dance music community, and for good reason - the visceral quality of this Cuban DJ/producer’s mixes make each set a memorable experience.

3) GRiZ

When: Day 3 at 10:00 PM Where: Movement Stage Before you let our last two masterminds carry you home, make sure you break away from those edgy techno grooves one last time to catch GRiZ’s set on the main stage. This self-proclaimed “crunkstep” producer made a bold departure from his usual style to put out the most infectiously funk-infused bass music album we’ve heard in a while. It’s safe to say all of those songs will end up in his set on the third day since the album came out so recently, so check him out while they're still hot off the press.

2) Joris Voorn

When: Day 3 at 10:30 Where: Beatport Stage While still certainly an up-and-comer in the North American scene, Dutch DJ/producer Joris Voorn has quickly made a name for himself overseas as one of the most innovative emerging names in techno. His unique, dreamlike production style incorporates elements of deep house while still managing to sound like nothing else on the market.

1) Kevin Saunderson & Derrick May

When: Day 3 at 10:30 PM Where: Thump Stage If you disregard everything else on this list (which would mean that you’ve actually completed your training and are now a full-fledged music snob), the single DJ set that you have to see in order to understand what techno truly is will be the one performed by Kevin Saunderson and Derrick “Mayday” May to close out the Thump stage on the third and final day of the festival. The two members of the “Belleville Three” most widely credited with developing the style of music that the third, Juan Atkins, would later call “techno,” May and Saunderson’s rhythms have reverberated throughout the concrete jungles of Detroit since the late ‘80s. As the video above firmly proves, May also commands prodigious skill as a turntablist - making his live sets a spectacle all their own." ["post_title"]=> string(48) "10 Artists To Name Drop At Movement Detroit 2015" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(267) "The following ten artists are slated to perform sets that you absolutely can't miss if you plan to check out the 2015 edition of Movement Detroit from May 23rd-25th - lest you pass up all the sweet, delicious street cred that taking part in the festival entitles you." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(32) "10-artists-drop-movement-detroit" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-05-14 13:39:35" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-14 18:39:35" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=428292" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [6]=> object(WP_Post)#385 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(428415) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "307" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-05-13 20:33:42" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-14 01:33:42" ["post_content"]=> string(90625) "Mad Men If the measure of a series were the strength of its character bench, Mad Men would be an easy contender for Best TV Show of All Time. It already is, regardless: since premiering in 2007, Matthew Weiner’s period drama has consistently been one of the best written, acted, directed and produced shows on television, and Sunday’s finale will mark the end of a series that put AMC, Weiner, and many terrific actors on the map. As far as casting depth and breadth go, Mad Men belongs in the same conversation as The Wire and The Sopranos, which is about the best company a show could ever hope to keep. It’s not going to be easy to see Mad Men end, mainly because that means saying goodbye to a host of unforgettable characters that made Sunday nights spent in the offices of Sterling Cooper feel like anything but overtime. The evolution of the main ensemble made sticking with the show a rewarding experience, but even minor players had the chance to make lasting impressions from the sidelines. Though its themes focused heavily on fatalism and inescapable ends, Mad Men’s own seems arbitrary at this point: why stop now, when we still love checking in on these people’s lives for 13 hours a year? But, all good things etc. While the finale itself will no doubt leave viewers with plenty to puzzle over, a broader question we can try to answer is this: of Mad Men’s many, many characters, who were the best? With one of the lengthiest cast lists out there, it’d be a monumental task to rank every single named character on the show, so we’ll be limiting ourselves to a meagre Top 100. What does “Top” mean exactly? Using an advanced computer algorithm fed through the IBM 360 (thus disqualifying the Monolith itself from competition), characters were ranked from “worst” to “best.” A number of criteria were considered, including a character’s impact on the show’s story and quality, and our general appraisal of that character as a human being. Furthermore, all participants must have appeared in multiple episodes: that means no one-offs like Joy, Guy, or Manolo. Without further ado, let the countdown commence! Brandon Killham in Mad Men

100) Dick Whitman

Played by: Brandon Killham, Jake Radaker, Jon Hamm First Appearance: "The Hobo Code" (Season 1, Episode 8) Okay, so we’re starting with a technicality here, but there’s a good reason: the flashbacks to Don Draper’s childhood are culturally and empirically proven to be bad. Whether it was Dick’s cathouse misadventures, or the show trying to pass off 37-year-old Jon Hamm as a fresh-faced military recruit, the flashbacks proved there was a limit to our interest in explaining Don Draper. Therefore, pre-Don, and by extension, most of the rest of the Whitman clan, have the honor of officially being The Worst. Please come to the podium to accept your commemorative Horseshoe of Overt Symbolism. Polly the Dog in Mad Men

99) Polly (The Dog)

Played by: A dog First Appearance: "Marriage of Figaro" (Season 1, Episode 3) Who’s a good girl?! Who was impulsively purchased by Don as an apology for bailing on his daughter’s birthday party?! Who ate one of the neighbor’s pigeons?! Who got banished to the basement after Betty and Don’s divorce because Henry’s a big jerk?! Laura Regan in Mad Men

98) Jennifer Crane

Played by: Laura Regan First Appearance: "Flight 1" (Season 2, Episode 2) Harry Crane’s long-suffering wife, in that being married to Harry Crane is a burden no woman should have to bear. Initially, the Crane marriage appears to be one of the stronger ones on the show, but as Harry’s infidelity and general asshole-ry got out of hand, she receded into the background. Ray Abruzzo in Mad Men

97) Jonesy

Played by: Ray Abruzzo First Appearance: "The Doorway, Part 1" (Season 6, Episode 1) Jonesy is the doorman in Don’s building. He almost died that one time. It was really scary for Don. But Dr. Rosen saved him! Keep up the good work, Jonesy! Larisa Oleynik in Mad Men

96) Cynthia Cosgrove

Played by: Larisa Oleynik First Appearance: "Chinese Wall" (Season 4, Episode 11) Cynthia. Cosgrove. Ken’s wife? Okay, probably doesn’t ring a bell. There was a whole running gag in “Signal 30” about Don and Megan trying to get through a Cosgrove dinner party while unable to remember their hostess’ name. But she seems like a generally well-adjusted person, and tried to guide Ken back to his writing career after it had taken so much from him. Jeff Clarke in Mad Men

95) Howard Dawes

Played by: Jeff Clarke First Appearance: "A Little Kiss, Part 1" (Season 5, Episode 1) Insurance salesmen aren’t especially likable. Philandering insurance salesmen even more so. And philandering insurance salesmen who have their wives committed for shock therapy? Forget about it. Until recently, Howard Dawes had the distinction of being the only man to enter a fight with Pete Campbell where we hoped Pete would be the winner. Christine Garver in Mad Men

94) Moira

Played by: Christine Garver First Appearance: "For Immediate Release" (Season 6, Episode 6) Ted Chaough’s secretary is defined by a fierce loyalty to Ted aaaaaand….not much else. When your most memorable moment is being snippy with Peggy, you’re not really standing out from the herd. That she hasn’t been seen around the office in more than a year suggests that her devotion to Ted wasn’t reciprocated. Andy Umberger in Mad Men

93) Dr. Arnold Wayne

Played by: Andy Umberger First Appearance: "Ladies Room" (Season 1, Episode 2) Betty’s shrink and Don’s snitch, Wayne had about as much going on in his life as the man himself had respect for doctor-patient confidentiality. Even though he was a fink (and a bit of a perv), at least his involvement in Betty’s life opened her up to the idea of getting Sally some counselling, and pursuing a psych degree of her own. Eric Ladin in Mad Men

92) William Hofstadt

Played by: Eric Ladin First Appearance: "The Inheritance" (Season 2, Episode 10) William’s an impressive figure, insofar that proving Betty isn’t the worst Hofstadt child is something of a feat. Petty, selfish, and just an all-around ingrate, William is actually worse for having married Judy, who seems perfectly nice otherwise. Just let him have your dad’s house, Betty! (Then burn it down). Charles Shaughnessy in Mad Men

91) St. John Powell

Played by: Charles Shaughnessy First Appearance: "The Jet Set" (Season 2, Episode 11) The connective surname in Putnam, Powell and Lowe, the British firm that bought Sterling Cooper back near the end of Season 2. He mostly just told Lane what to do from across the pond, and conspired to have the Sterling Cooper-enhanced PPL sold to McCann Erikson. He also stands out because of the peculiar way Lane would pronounce his name (Sin-jin? Sen-jin? It’s probably some British-ism). Gabriel Mann in Mad Men

90) Arthur Case

Played by: Gabriel Mann First Appearance: "For Those Who Think Young" (Season 2, Episode 2) The high-society horse rider Betty trotted around while considering a fling in Season 2, Arthur is the handsome heart of one of the dullest storylines the show ever did. As a tempting outlet for Betty’s frustration with Don, he serves his purpose just fine, but the show lost nothing for pitching Arthur as soon as it could. Alexis Bledel in Mad Men

89) Beth Dawes

Played by: Alexis Bledel First Appearance: "Lady Lazarus" (Season 5, Episode 8) As an object of yearning, Beth is perfect for Pete: flavorless, pretty, and most importantly, in need of rescue. As an individual, though, the most interesting thing Beth has going for her is the time travel fan fiction you’ll write in your head that explains how Rory Gilmore wound up in the 1960s. Craig Anton in Mad Men

88) Frank Gleason

Played by: Craig Anton First Appearance: "For Immediate Release" (Season 6, Episode 6) The art director of Cutler, Gleason and Chaough, we hardly knew Frank. That’s because the first time we met him was when he told Ted he had terminal cancer. He showed up once more to give Ted sage advice for dealing with Don after the SC&P merger, but his contribution to Mad Men was greater in death than in life. Ray Wise in Mad Men

87) Ed Baxter

Played by: Ray Wise First Appearance: "Chinese Wall" (Season 4, Episode 11) Con: Ed isn’t much of a character on his own, beyond his function as a potential business opportunity for his son-in-law, Ken Cosgrove. Pro: He’s played by Ray Wise, and loves Pop-Tarts, which count for something. Ryan Cartwright in Mad Men

86) John Hooker

Played by: Ryan Cartwright First Appearance: "Out of Town" (Season 3, Episode 1) Lane’s sycophant secretary, John Hooker spent so much time puffing himself up that he seemed in constant danger of floating away. He’s a lackey of the lowest kind, the sort of spineless “yes” man who will grovel in front of superiors, yet swear he’s better than any of the women put in the same position. He’s so pathetic, even Lane knew he was worth ditching. Lane! Stephen Mendel in Mad Men

85) Morris Ginsberg

Played by: Stephen Mendel First Appearance: "Tea Leaves" (Season 5, Episode 3) Morris is a mensch for having adopted Michael, but as a father, his track record is a little spottier. Yes, he’s got sage advice when the world’s gone topsy-turvy, and he set Ginsberg up with that nice Jewish girl that one time. But he’s largely a burden in Michael’s eyes, and it’s hard to disagree, given his overbearing nature. Derek Ray in Mad Men

84) Brooks Hargrove

Played by: Derek Ray First Appearance: "Three Sundays" (Season 2, Episode 4) When you marry into the Sterling family, you need to be three things: handsome, witty, and lively. Brooks bats a low .333 on those requirements, as any time the would-be refrigeration magnate walked into a room, he was in danger of being outshined by one of the office plants. Put another way: the coolest thing Brooks ever did was windup in jail for getting in a bar fight, and even that was so dull it wasn’t worth showing. You’re not a bad guy, Brooks, just a boring one. Ryder Londo in Mad Men

83) Gene Draper

Played by: Ryder and Evan Londo First Appearance: "The Fog" (Season 3, Episode 5) It’s hard to hold Gene’s status as a non-entity against him, considering he was literally a non-entity for two seasons of the show. We shouldn’t expect great things from a baby, but imagine if Gene had turned out half as interesting as back when Sally thought he was the reincarnated spirit for her recently passed grandpa Gene? Anne Dudek in Mad Men

82) Francine Hanson

Played by: Anne Dudek First Appearance: "Ladies Room" (Season 1, Episode 2) You can kind of forgive Francine’s busybody attitude and need to constantly smack talk all the other Ossining ladies. She was trapped in the same suburban hell as Betty, and her husband was a cheater just like Don (unlike Don, he was blasé enough to not even make this list. Sorry, all you Carlton fans out there). Any points she gains for distraughtly contemplating poisoning his ass are deducted five-fold for bringing the kids and in-laws into the discussion. Matt Long in Mad Men

81) Joey Baird

Played by: Matt Long First Appearance: "Public Relations" (Season 4, Episode 1) Listen, Joey. You could have just stuck to parroting Stan Freberg routines with Peggy (“John!” “Marsha!”), or overestimating just how into you Harry Crane was. But no. You had to go and be a misogynistic P.O.S. to Joan, and get yourself canned in such a way that made Peggy and Joan mad at each other. Tally ho, asshole! Channing Chase in Mad Men

80) Dorothy 'Dot' Campbell

Played by: Channing Chase First Appearance: "New Amsterdam" (Season 1, Episode 4) Dot had to endure a lot over the course of her time on the show, including the untimely death of her husband, and dementia that made her a hot potato to Pete and Bud. A winter-fall romance with her debonair caretaker, Manolo Colon, seemed like a light at the end of her life. Then she accidentally(?) fell off a cruise ship on her honeymoon. It wasn’t a nice way to go, but at least Dot’s death was worthy of the storied Dykeman name. La Monde Byrd in Mad Men

79) Hollis

Played by: La Monde Byrd First Appearance: "Red in the Face" (Season 1, Episode 7) Sterling Cooper’s chief elevator attendant, and sounding board off which its employees would bounce their weird race questions, Hollis was the inside man for one of Don’s earliest and greatest capers: getting Roger to spew in front of clients after eating too many oysters and climbing too many stairs. Hollis deserved better than he got, even before he was left behind with the Sterling Cooper detritus following the founding of SCDP. Patrick Cavanaugh in Mad Men

78) Smitty Smith

Played by: Patrick Cavanaugh First Appearance: "For Those Who Think Young" (Season 2, Episode 1) One of the young guns brought in at the start of Season 2 to see what the kids are into these days, Smitty’s most memorable moment was talking up Don to Ted Chaough after he’d been left behind in the great office exodus of Season 3. He can’t even come up with a good tag while stoned, so it’s no wonder we don’t see him again after SCDP and CGC merged. Embeth Davidtz in Mad Men

77) Rebecca Pryce

Played by: Embeth Davidtz First Appearance: "Love Among the Ruins" (Season 3, Episode 2) Posh and prickly, Lane’s wife hated New York with a passion few could rival. Rebecca’s appearances were few, and initially she mostly hung around to henpeck Lane. Sadly, it’s only immediately after Lane’s suicide (partly inspired by her impulsive and grimly funny purchase of a Jaguar) that Rebecca’s love and respect for her husband really came to light. She also classily put Don in his place when he tried to return Lane’s $50,000 investment in the firm, giving her the last, grief-stricken word on the failed British invasion of Sterling Cooper. Deborah Lacey in Mad Men

76) Carla

Played by: Deborah Lacey First Appearance: "The Wheel" (Season 1, Episode 13) Perhaps the most dependable parental figure in the lives of Sally and Bobby, Carla may have spent more time raising the Draper children in their early years than Don or Betty ever did. And what’d she get for all her years of hard work? The heave-ho from Betty, without so much as a reference letter. Admittedly, it’s because she allowed Glenn Bishop into the house, but she was under duress! One can only hope, nay, assume she found a better household after leaving the Draper residence. Audrey Wasilewski in Mad Men

75) Anita Olson Respola

Played by: Audrey Wasilewski First Appearance: "Flight 1" (Season 2, Episode 2) Supportive siblings are in short supply on Mad Men, so whenever Anita was there for her sister, it was nice to know that Peggy was getting some familial backup through her difficult career path. But Anita had a petty streak, and confessing on your sister’s behalf about the baby she had out of wedlock is the jerkiest jerk move one can make in the deeply religious Olson household. Joe O'Connor in Mad Men

74) Tom Vogel

Played by: Joe O'Connor First Appearance: "New Amsterdam" (Season 1, Episode 4) Tom should be the exception to the “don’t mix family and business” rule. He’s overwhelmingly, almost insufferably supportive of Pete, dotting on his son-in-law almost as much as his own daughter. But he’s also a massive hypocrite who doesn’t understand the concept of mutually assured destruction. Withdrawing business from you son-in-law because you saw him in a brothel is one thing – acting all holier than though when you were in that same brothel is another. Zosia Mamet in Mad Men

73) Joyce Ramsay

Played by: Zosia Mamet First Appearance: "The Rejected" (Season 4, Episode 4) Peggy’s “in” to the counter-culture crowd of the mid-‘60s, Joyce’s ability to blend in at the SCDP offices was reflective of the firm’s increasingly DGAF attitude toward propriety. She can’t be held responsible for how poorly pairing Peggy and Abe together would turn out, as Joyce’s willingness to hook a gal up after being rejected herself is the sign of a true friend. Jessy Schram in Mad Men

72) Bonnie Whiteside

Played by: Jessy Schram First Appearance: "Time Zones" (Season 7, Episode 1) At first blush, Bonnie seems almost too perfect for Pete. She’s a real estate saleswoman with a no-nonsense approach to business that Pete often aspires to. That she’s also attracted to Pete is a plus, and you can imagine an alternate reality where the two have a successful, sociopathic little family together in L.A. But the pull of New York and his old family was too much for Pete, and Bonnie promptly, efficiently dumped the fixer-upper Campbell. Rich Hutchman in Mad Men

71) Bud Campbell

Played by: Rich Hutchman First Appearance: "Flight 1" (Season 2, Episode 2) Like William Hofstadt, Bud exists to make a sibling look better by proxy. Bud’s just Pete with better hair and lesser ambitions, thought this made him the favourite son of his not-so-loveable parents. At least by the end of the series, Bud had wised up enough to heed his younger brother’s advice about not wasting a good home life when you’ve got one. Caity Lotz in Mad Men

70) Stephanie Horton

Played by: Caity Lotz First Appearance: "The Good News" (Season 4, Episode 3) Like Margaret, Anna Draper’s niece was a straight arrow that wound up a flower child. As Don’s last living connection to his past, the sexual tension between the two was certainly in keeping with Don as we knew him, but she, like Anna, was one of the few people Don could ever be his real self around. Brian Markinson in Mad Men

69) Dr. Arnold Rosen

Played by: Brian Markinson First Appearance: "The Doorway, Part 1" (Season 6, Episode 1) One of the few guys Don’s gotten to know well enough to properly cuckold, Dr. Rosen seemed blissfully unaware of the fact that his apartment pal was running around with his wife. Don’s affair with Sylvia is all the more a betrayal because Dr. Rosen is someone Don actually seems to respect. Few professionals make you unsatisfied with your achievements quite like a doctor can, and though Arnold wasn’t the most charismatic sort, he’s the guy who’ll ski through a New York blizzard just to get the job done. Michael Gaston in Mad Men

68) Burt Peterson

Played by: Michael Gaston First Appearance: "Out of Town" (Season 3, Episode 1) Whether making late night calls in his undies, or being subjected to serial firings by Roger, Burt Peterson made for as good a piñata as Mad Men ever had to offer. “Fellow comrades in mediocrity,” this titan of mid-tier creative once roared, “I want you to listen very carefully. You can all go straight to hell.” You too buddy. You too. Paul Johansson in Mad Men

67) Ferg Donnelly

Played by: Paul Johansson First Appearance: "Severance" (Season 7, Episode 8) Jim Hobart’s chief underling and McCann Erikson’s resident (terrible) impressionist, Ferg looks and acts like a shaved gorilla. He’s all glad-handing and smiles one minute, and the next he’s making advances at Joan while holding her job hostage. We knew McCann Erikson was going to be hell, we just didn’t expect guys like Ferg were capable of living down to such low expectations. Alexa Alemanni in Mad Men

66) Allison

Played by: Alexa Alemanni First Appearance: "Marriage of Figaro" (Season 1, Episode 3) A longtime hanger-on in the office until rising to some prominence in Season 4, everything you need to know about Allison can be summed up in the title of her last appearance: “The Rejected.” In her defense, Don, in the throes of post-divorce self-destruction, did everything in his power to ignore the fact that they slept together. But she’s also the sort of person who finds it difficult to call an obvious prick like Don “not a good person.” Sadly, she wasn’t cutout to be Don’s secretary. At least we can thank her for inspiring one of the show’s silliest visual gags. Kit Williamson in Mad Men

65) Ed

Played by: Kit Williamson First Appearance: "The Doorway, Part 2" (Season 6, Episode 1) As far as office third-stringers go, Ed was pretty A-OK. He and Mathis proved useful enough to Peggy that she was able to keep them after the SCDP/CGC merger. He didn’t have his pal’s knack for glorious self-immolation, but left the agency with a bit of dignity, and a lot of free phone calls. And he’s a Japanese-speaking Mets fan? Shame you only got so interesting at the very end, Ed. Trevor Einhorn in Mad Men

64) John Mathis

Played by: Trevor Einhorn First Appearance: "The Doorway, Part 2" (Season 6, Episode 1) Ed’s partner in obscurity, Mathis was able to comfortably coast in the background for a good long while. His exit was more spectacular than any of his work, as his blaze-of-glory exit from SC&P was a dressing-down of Don that only a guy on a suicide mission could afford. He worked like a drone, but went out like a (still pretty idiotic) champ. Pamela Dunlap in Mad Men

63) Pauline Francis

Played by: Pamela Dunlap First Appearance: "Public Relations" (Season 4, Episode 1) Henry’s battle-axe of a mother, Pauline’s disapproval for her son’s divorce is second only to her contempt for his new wife. Pushy, abrasive, and over-eager to play the “my son’s very important” card, Pauline is not without her charms. “Mystery Date” saw her and Sally falling asleep to the news of the Richard Speck murders, Sally under the couch, and Pauline on guard duty with a paring knife in hand. Clearly, Pauline is to be underestimated at your own peril. Darby Stanchfield in Mad Men

62) Helen Bishop

Played by: Darby Stanchfield First Appearance: "Ladies Room" (Season 1, Episode 2) Remember in Season 1 when a divorcée on the block was all anyone could talk about? Remember that her name was Helen Bishop? In retrospect, you wonder if there was once a version of Mad Men where Helen did more than just bring the big D-word to Ossington. Long-term, her contribution to the show was Glen more than anything, but at least we’ll always have Betty’s supermarket slap from “Red in the Face” to remember her by. Patrick Fischler in Mad Men

61) Jimmy Barrett

Played by: Patrick Fischler First Appearance: "The Benefactor" (Season 2, Episode 3) The standup who never learned the value of knowing when to shut up, Jimmy made his living by having a mouth big enough to stick both feet in. That people seemed to love him for this bedevilled Don, who often had to cleanup after Jimmy’s messes. Jimmy put the “Utz” in “putz,” but you kind of have to appreciate the guy’s quick wits –who among us could come up with a wisecrack in the split-second between getting punched by Don Draper, and recovering from getting punched by Don Draper? Crista Flanagan in Mad Men

60) Lois Sadler

Played by: Crista Flanagan First Appearance: "The Hobo Code" (Season 1, Episode 8) Lois didn’t leave a huge mark on the show for most of her run. She had a thing for Sal, and used to be a switchboard operator. Then she ran over a guy’s foot with a lawnmower. Immortalization in television history: achieved. Danny Strong in Mad Men

59) Danny Siegel

Played by: Danny Strong First Appearance: "Waldorf Stories" (Season 4, Episode 6) The cure for the common employee, Danny’s hiring at SCDP owed entirely to a drunken mistake by Don, and a blood-tie to Jane, and not his impressive portfolio of other people’s work. Danny’s contribution to the office from thereon out was minor, but he found a better life for himself out in California after the agency let him go. Plus, he eventually got to punch Roger in the junk as revenge for all the jokes about his height, which was a great time for all (except Roger). Charlie Hofheimer in Mad Men

58) Abe Drexler

Played by: Charlie Hofheimer First Appearance: "The Rejected" (Season 4, Episode 4) Re-watching the early Abe and Peggy episodes can be a little tough; after all, how does a relationship that starts so promising turn into one where Peggy stabs Abe with a homemade bayonet, and he breaks up with her by calling her “the enemy?” Abe embodied the counter-culture movement that Peggy was only ever a tourist in, so they were pretty much doomed from the jump. That Peggy got a few good pitch ideas, and a whole apartment out of her time with Abe means we can forgive some of his trespasses, and questionable facial hair choices. Elizabeth Rice in Mad Men

57) Margaret Sterling Hargrove

Played by: Elizabeth Rice First Appearance: "Babylon" (Season 1, Episode 6) Look, we all love Roger. But we can all agree that, as far as paternal figures go, he’s about the only guy out there that could make Don look like father of the year. So you can blame nurture for Margaret’s obnoxious attitude, which includes a fondness for dullards (sorry, Brooks), making the Kennedy assassination all about her (okay, it was her wedding day), and a general entitlement complex. Like Roger, we’re fine with abandoning her to the life of a barnyard hippie. Sam Page in Mad Men

56) Greg Harris

Played by: Sam Page First Appearance: "For Those Who Think Young" (Season 4, Episode 1) Really, you could get across everyone’s feelings about Greg using audio clips of a dry-heaving house cat, but his importance to Joan’s growth through the series can’t be ignored, even in light of the fact that he’s a worthless, delusion piece of human garbage. Were not so many indelible Joan moments tied to Greg – such as the reveal of Joan as an accordionist, and that time she smashed a vase on his head - he’d be in the gutter where he belongs. Colin Hanks in Mad Men

55) Father John Gill

Played by: Colin Hanks First Appearance: "Three Sundays" (Season 2, Episode 4) Despite being the highest-ranking religious authority on Mad Men, Father Gill was pretty hip to the times. He enlisted Peggy to write copy for the church’s teen social, and learned how to play guitar while in Rome. He’s also a total babe, explaining Gill and Peggy’s mutual attraction. But then Anita went and brought up Peggy’s pregnancy during a confessional, and Gill got pretty pushy about the whole “salvation” thing. His heart was in the right place, but giving Peggy an Easter egg “for the little one?” Dick move, Father. Abigail Spencer in Mad Men

54) Suzanne Farrell

Played by: Abigail Spencer First Appearance: "Love Among the Ruins" (Season 3, Episode 2) The buildup to Don’s relationship with Sally’s third grade teacher was pretty enticing, as it was back during a time when Don was at least attempting to stay faithful to Betty. But the culmination of it was an affair not to be remembered. Suzanne gave Don another young man in need of an identity change to mentor (in this case, her epileptic younger brother), and introduced him to the concept of jogging. Other than that, she was a spring fling that wound up quickly forgotten. Christine Estabrook in Mad Men

53) Gail Holloway

Played by: Christine Estabrook First Appearance: "A Little Kiss, Part 1" (Season 5, Episode 1) The passive-aggressive mother to end all passive-aggressive mothers, Gail Holloway is responsible for many of Joan’s characteristic traits. She’s sharp-tongued, able to expose other people’s insecurities, and knows how to get men to lend a hand. She may not have been a big help to Joan during her marriage to Greg, but is, by her own admission, proud of what Joan has accomplished with her career. If you’re looking for a babysitter or a backhanded compliment, you go to Gail. Elizabeth Reaser in Mad Men

52) Diana Baur

Played by: Elizabeth Reaser First Appearance: "Severance" (Season 7, Episode 8) Arguably the character whose ranking will be most subject to shifting after the finale, it’s not exactly clear what Diana is supposed to be to Don, or Mad Men. Is she a mirror of Don, an amalgamation of his past mistakes, or just a woman from Wisconsin trying to start her life over? It seems just as likely that the whole series finale be exclusively about Diana as it does that she never appears again. She’s certainly left an impression on the final season – we’ll just have to wait and see whether that impression is ultimately a good or bad thing. Jay Paulson in Mad Men

51) Adam Whitman

Played by: Jay Paulson First Appearance: "5G" (Season 1, Episode 5) Yes, Don did accidentally blowup his commanding officer, but arguably the biggest casualty from his change of identities was half-brother Adam. Abandoned by Dick, Adam went on to live a modest life that was ruined the moment he tried to reestablish contact with his brother. Throwing money at Adam to make him go away is one of the worst things Don has ever done, leading to Adam hanging himself. Adam gets plenty of sympathy points, but is handicapped by his post-mortal employment as a metaphor-dispensing ghost dentist (“It’s not your tooth that’s rotten!”). Peyton List in Mad Men

50) Jane Siegel

Played by: Peyton List First Appearance: "The New Girl" (Season 2, Episode 5) Jane’s rap sheet does not tell a particularly flattering tale. She constantly butted heads with Joan. She gave Roger an incentive to breakup his family. She thinks blackface routines are hi-larious. But Jane was young, naïve, and vulnerable to the charms of Roger Sterling. Can you blame her? At least she had some cool friends who helped start Roger on the path of self-discovery through hallucinogens. And she busted into Bert Cooper’s office once to check out his fancy new painting. That takes serious baitsim. Melinda McGraw in Mad Men

49) Bobbie Barrett

Played by: Melinda McGraw First Appearance: "The Benefactor" (Season 2, Episode 3) Arguably the more obnoxious half of the Barrett duo, Bobbie proved to be the most unpredictable and destructive of Don’s extramarital interests. She’s a pretty decent manager, and knows a good/bad TV title pun when she thinks of one (Grin and Barrett). When it comes to matters of discretion, though, she’s two fingers of trouble. In a sense, it’s a good thing she came along, as it seemed as though Betty would need someone as careless as Bobbie to finally get wise to Don’s infidelity. Gary Basaraba in Mad Men

48) Herb Rennet

Played by: Gary Basaraba First Appearance: "The Other Woman" (Season 5, Episode 11) Ugh. The jag-off from Jaguar, Herb was responsible for ensuring upstart SCDP had a car to call its own…so long as he got to spend a night with Joan. She got a partnership out of the deal, and SCDP had an account to keep them occupied until Chevy came around, but Don selfishly flushing the account just to get rid of the skuzzball was good riddance to bad business. Let’s hope we haven’t seen his ugly mug since because his wife Peaches had him mauled to death by her puppies. Bruce Greenwood as Richard Burghoff and Christina Hendricks as J

47) Richard

Played by: Bruce Greenwood First Appearance: "The Forecast" (Season 7, Episode 10) Had he not walked into Joan’s life so late in Mad Men’s run, Richard would be on track to place much higher in the rankings. He made a not-so charming fuss over Joan having a kid, but he was also smart enough to realize what an idiotic thing to do that was. This is Joan we’re talking about, bud. Joan. All things considered, Richard’s a catch: he’s well off, attentive, and looks like Bruce Greenwood. And he knows “a guy,” in case you ever need your lecherous boss taken care of. We like you Richard – don’t betray our trust in the finale. And for God’s sake, let Joan start picking out your wardrobe. Beth Hall in Mad Men

46) Caroline

Played by: Beth Hall First Appearance: "Christmas Comes But Once a Year" (Season 4, Episode 2) Oh, sweet, perfectly adequate Caroline. You were never the brightest secretary, nor the most reliable. Roger, in his own words, kind of hated you. But we love your unflappability, your commitment to getting through the day at your own pace, and not letting SCDP chew you up and spit you out the way it has so many others. Darren Pettie in Mad Men

45) Lee Garner Jr.

Played by: Darren Pettie First Appearance: "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" (Season 1, Episode 1) As the heir to the business that made-up more than half of Sterling Cooper’s billings for most of its lifespan, Lee turning heel was less a question of “if” than “when.” Those who inherit great wealth on Mad Men often turn out to be morons or bullies, and Lee is most certainly in the latter camp, forcing Sal’s firing when he didn’t return Lee’s advances, and humiliating Roger at the office Christmas party. But the firm, and Roger could look back and laugh at the guy (including that time Roger had to hold his balls) once Lee took his cancerous toys to another sandbox. Chelcie Ross in Mad Men

44) Conrad 'Connie' Hilton

Played by: Chelcie Ross First Appearance: "My Old Kentucky Home" (Season 3, Episode 3) As a sort of surrogate father figure, Connie gave Don something to aspire to: he was respected, introspective, yet never without purpose. Connie himself liked Don enough to call him a son…for a time. The longer their relationship wore on, the clearer it became that Connie was just as insufferable as any other client, the difference being that Connie didn’t just want the moon from Don, but believed he deserved it. Mary Anne McGarry in Mad Men

43) Alice Cooper

Played by: Mary Anne McGarry First Appearance: "The Mountain King" (Season 2, Episode 12) Barely squeaking in thanks to a wordless second appearance in Season 3’s “The Color Blue,” it would have been worth bending the rules anyway for Bert’s younger sister Alice. As secretary treasurer of the company, Alice was instrumental in getting Sterling Cooper to accept the PPL takeover. In her three scenes from “The Mountain King,” she gets in more digs at Roger and Bert than others would dare attempt in a lifetime, suggesting that Sterling Cooper was long operating without its craftiest and classiest partner. Edin Gali in Mad Men

42) Kurt Smith

Played by: Edin Gali First Appearance: "For Those Who Think Young" (Season 2, Episode 1) As part of the brat pack hired to youth-inize Sterling Cooper, Kurt is just the cool version of Smitty. He’s European, he goes to Bob Dylan concerts, and is totally chill about his sexual orientation (even if nobody else is). More importantly, he gave Peggy the Haircut of Power that would help define her look during her rapid rise through the agency. You were too good for Sterling Cooper, Kurt! Myra Turley in Mad Men

41) Katherine Olson

Played by: Myra Turley First Appearance: "Flight 1" (Season 2, Episode 2) Though mama Olson’s presence usually meant Peggy was due for a motherly haranguing, Katherine did bring out the Brooklyn accent in her daughter, which was always a treat to hear. A bit of a devout diva, Katherine was as old-fashioned as they come, and was better as being a uniting nuisance for the Olson sisters than a bedrock of support for her daughters. Still, whether bossing around Father Gill, or reacting to Peggy living in sin, Katherine was a scream…so long as she wasn’t your mother. H. Richard Greene in Mad Men

40) Jim Hobart

Played by: H. Richard Greene First Appearance: "Shoot" (Season 1, Episode 9) Regardless of whether Weiner and company knew the role Jim Hobart would play back when they wrote his first appearance, as the head of McCann Erikson he provided Mad Men with a looming threat since the first season. A Faustian figure that Don and company managed to reject or escape for nearly a decade, Jim was responsible for not only the death of Sterling Cooper, but also the dissolution of its dysfunctional work family. Whether tempting the SC&P partners with accounts like Coca-Cola and Buick, or muscling Joan out after the absorption, Jim Hobart was the closest Mad Men ever came to having an outright villain, and H. Richard Greene played the part to the hilt. Linda Cardellini in Mad Men

39) Sylvia Rosen

Played by: Linda Cardellini First Appearance: "The Doorway, Part 1" (Season 6, Episode 1) Don’s mistress for Season 6, and his first (confirmed) affair in his marriage to Megan, Sylvia presented a whole host of complications that Don didn’t seem to mind. She was married to a friendly acquaintance, lived in his building, and had a heaping helping of Catholic guilt weighing on her through the relationship. Her dumping of Don was as smart as her reunion with him was stupid (he did get her son out of Vietnam). Sally walking in on the two was the wakeup call both needed, though at great cost to all parties involved. Sola Bamis in Mad Men

38) Shirley

Played by: Sola Bamis First Appearance: "Time Zones" (Season 7, Episode 1) A fabulous dresser and frequently reassigned secretary, Shirley’s introduction in the 7th season gave Dawn a confidante amidst the otherwise monochromatic SC&P. That she never held onto one desk for too long was more reflective of the incompetence/insecurities of her bosses (Peggy included) than her own abilities, but leaving behind SC&P after the McCann Erikson takeover made Shirley more ahead of the curve than most. Jacob Guenther in Mad Men

37) Julio

Played by: Jacob Guenther First Appearance: "Time Zones" (Season 7, Episode 1) Julio does two things really well: watch TV, and remind Peggy of her estranged son. As a comic foil, Julio made Peggy’s landlord responsibilities an amusing nightmare. But Julio’s last moment with Peggy in “Waterloo,” in which they say goodbye to one another before he moves to Newark, is a bullet aimed squarely for your heart. It’s one of Elisabeth Moss’ best scenes in the entire series, and it wouldn’t have happened without the pint-sized, popsicle-loving Julio. Ryan Cutrona in Mad Men

36) Gene Hofstadt

Played by: Ryan Cutrona First Appearance: "The Inheritance" (Season 2, Episode 10) As a grandfather, Gene’s pretty great. He adores his grandchildren immensely, spoiling them with ice cream and pickelhaubes. As a father, he’s less loveable. He never liked Don, and got over the death of Betty’s mother a whole lot faster than Betty did. Repeated strokes made him a burden to Don and Betty (who he attempted to grope while in a fugue state), but the fond memories of Gene held by Sally and Bobby will likely outlive what frustrations he presented to their parents. Christopher Stanley in Mad Men

35) Henry Francis

Played by: Christopher Stanley First Appearance: "My Old Kentucky Home" (Season 3, Episode 3) If forced to choose between Betty or Nelson Rockefeller, it’s unclear which Henry would pick as the love of his life. He’s a rigid politician’s politician, but he’s a pretty decent guy all told. He takes a genuine interest in his step-kids, is involved in local government, and even knows what a feinting couch is. It wasn’t until breaking down in front of Sally last week that it was clear Henry was capable of relaying emotions other than “reassuring” and “peeved,” but he’s given Betty many of the qualities in a husband she missed out on in Don: faithful, reliable, and present. Mason Vale Cotton in Mad Men

34) Bobby Draper

Played by: Maxwell Huckabee, Aaron Hart, Jared S. Gilmore and Mason Vale Cotton First Appearance: "Ladies Room" (Season 1, Episode 2) One day, a tell-all titled We Were Bobbys will explain the revolving door of actors tasked with playing Don and Betty’s second, oft-ignored child. In their defense, it’s not as though Weiner and company gave any of the early Bobbys a chance to put much of a stamp on the role. Mason Vale Cotton did well holding onto the part during the later seasons though, when Bobby had a few opportunities to express himself though an appreciation of Planet of the Apes, and some poor lunchtime bartering choices. Cara Buono in Mad Men

33) Dr. Faye Miller

Played by: Cara Buono First Appearance: "Christmas Comes But Once a Year" (Season 4, Episode 2) Dr. Miller was one of the more successful, self-possessed, and intriguing romances Don pursued, so of course he’d break up with her after getting engaged to his secretary on a whim. Despite Allison giving her a test-case for what happens when you get involved with Don Draper, Faye kept giving him more ground, even as Don’s demands put her own career in jeopardy. Don’s dismissal of her was heartless, but at least she got to leave him with a howitzer of a diagnosis: “you only like the beginnings of things.” Well said, doc. Marten Holden Weiner in Mad Men

32) Glen Bishop

Played by: Marten Holden Weiner First Appearance: "Ladies Room" (Season 1, Episode 2) Characters on Mad Men don’t get much more divisive than Glen. In some eyes, he was the early poster child for the post-divorce generation the show’s cast all became a part of. To others, though, he was the weird kid from down the street whose obsession with Betty became overwhelmingly creeping. That he’s still trying to get with Betty by the time he’s 18 is even more concerning, but he proved a needed confidante to first Betty, and later Sally…which just makes him putting the moves on her mom that much more messed up, come to think of it. Talia Balsam in Mad Men

31) Mona Sterling

Played by: Talia Balsam First Appearance: "Ladies Room" (Season 1, Episode 2) It takes confidence to play opposite an on-screen version of your husband that’s a philandering rake, but Talia Balsam and John Slattery made for a dynamite pairing as Mona and Roger. She ultimately got off better than Roger when he left her to marry Jane, as Mona at least managed to hold onto her second spouse. But it was the second act of Mona and Roger’s relationship that revealed why they ever worked in the first place, as their years of history treated them better in divorce than they did in marriage. If anyone ever truly “got” Roger Sterling, it was Mona. Allan Havey in Mad Men

30) Lou Avery

Played by: Allan Havey First Appearance: "In Care Of" (Season 6, Episode 12) It was bold of Mad Men to include a historical figure like Lou Avery in the show, as Scout’s Honor remains one of today’s most beloved cartoon creations. Like all great artists, though, Lou Avery wasn’t really cut out for the corporate world. As Don’s replacement, and source of Peggy’s frustration, Lou was as smug as he was out of touch. He was better at accidentally overhearing his subordinates shit-talking him than he ever was as a creative director, and his casual sexism was regressive even by SC&P’s standards. And that tiki bar in his office? Tack. Y. Mark Moses in Mad Men

29) Herman 'Duck' Phillips

Played by: Mark Moses First Appearance: "Nixon vs. Kennedy" (Season 1, Episode 12) A callous excuse-maker when sober, and a blathering disaster when drunk, Duck is a 10th dan black belt in the art of self-sabotage. He’s got the cunning to set himself up as president of Sterling Cooper following the PPL merger, but can’t keep his mouth shut long enough to close the deal. His downward spiral afterwards was marked by one pathetic low after another (though, trying to take a crap in Roger’s office was a series comic high), and it’s only once he got back on the wagon that a functional human being to reemerge. But Duck did once abandon his Irish Setter just so he wouldn’t feel guilty about falling off to begin with. Go ahead and ruin your own life, Duck, but leave Chauncey out of it! Rosemarie DeWitt in Mad Men

28) Midge Daniels

Played by: Rosemarie DeWitt First Appearance: "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" (Season 1, Episode 1) How memorable Midge is as a character versus how memorable she is as a character played by Rosemarie DeWitt is debatable, but as the first of Don’s sidepieces we’re introduced to, Midge set a pretty high bar. Bohemian, intelligent, and better at resisting Don’s allue than most, our sad final reunion with Midge – technically married to a penniless addict - does little to overshadow what a unique presence she was on Mad Men during its first season. Randee Heller in Mad Men

27) Miss Ida Blankenship

Played by: Randee Heller First Appearance: "The Rejected" (Season 4, Episode 4) “"She was born in 1898 in a barn. She died on the 37th floor of a skyscraper. She's an astronaut." No one can top Bert Cooper’s succinct, poetic summation of one of Sterling Cooper’s oldest employees (though, Roger tries with “Queen of Perversions”), but Miss Blankenship’s tenure on Mad Men was as brief as it was hilarious. She even managed to die in a manner that made her a hall-of-fame-worthy secretary. You’ve been long gone, Miss Blankenship, but never forgotten. Joel Murray in Mad Men

26) Freddy Rumsen

Played by: Joel Murray First Appearance: "Babylon" (Season 1, Episode 6) One of the few alcoholics at Sterling Cooper lucky enough bounce back from his bottom, Freddy became a lot less fun, but a lot healthier the minute he stopped drinking. Booze cost him his job at the agency, and with him went one of Peggy’s first real supporters. His freelance pop-ins have been welcome ever since, whether bailing Don out of a drunken stupor, or proving that the power of Don’s pitches are in his words, not his looks. He even helped Peggy get her job as copy chief at CGC, another opportunity opened up to her by Freddy’s aid/mistakes. No Freddy peeing himself before the Samsonite meeting, no Peggy on Samsonite. No Peggy on Samsonite, no “The Suitcase.” Thanks for taking one for the team, Freddy. Stephanie Drake in Mad Men

25) Meredith

Played by: Stephanie Drake First Appearance: "A Little Kiss, Part 2" (Season 5, Episode 1) In three seasons Meredith went from receptionist, to secretary, to invaluable supporting presence, assuming you consider perky and oblivious commentary a valuable contribution to Mad Men. Whether putting the moves on Don during a pep talk, sitting on the receiving end of Joan’s fury, or just generally being a brightly-dressed ray of sunshine, Meredith seemed to live in her own little world. By the time she’s cheerily telling a furious Jim Hobart he’ll have to leave a message, Meredith is already a given for the Mad Men comic relief pantheon. Michael Gladis in Mad Men

24) Paul Kinsey

Played by: Michael Gladis First Appearance: "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" (Season 1, Episode 1) A bon vivant, Princeton alum, a cappella singer, supporter of the proletariat, and author of the worst Star Trek spec script ever written, the accumulated respect Paul Kinsey garnered at Sterling Cooper probably wouldn’t measure up half as high as his own opinion of himself. Supportive of others until they make him look bad, progressive so long as everyone else knows about it, and constantly in danger of running his mouth, Kinsey was an easy cut from the staff when Sterling Cooper needed to reinvent itself. The funny thing is, Kinsey would have been a perfect fit for the looser direction SCDP would take, but the show had used Kinsey for all he was worth by that point. Julia Ormond in Mad Men

23) Marie Calvet

Played by: Julia Ormond First Appearance: "At the Codfish Ball" (Season 5, Episode 7) Frequently exasperated mother of Megan, occasional lover of Roger, and constant source of en francais smack talk, Marie is a treat to watch in action. She seems to get off on belittling her husband, and leaves no wound in the lives of her daughters unsalted. But she’s also a vivacious boozehound with a withering sense of humor, and maybe the only woman who could go toe-to-toe and bon mot-for-bon mot with Roger. Here’s hoping those two crazy kids can make it work! Mad Men (Season 5)

22) Dawn Chambers

Played by: Teyonah Parris First Appearance: "Tea Leaves" (Season 5, Episode 3) Like Peggy before her, Dawn was able to turn an inch of an opening at a white, male-dominated office into a mile of a career. Though initially hired as part of an equal opportunity stunt meant to embarrass SCDP’s competitors, Dawn quickly worked her way up to office manager, earning the respect of Don and Joan in the process. Granted, like Peggy, her personal life became almost non-existent thanks to the demands of the job, and as with Hollis, Dawn’s status as the only African American employee in the office put her in a precarious position during the later years of the civil rights movement. Sometimes that would lead to cringe-worthy bits like an awkward sympathy hug from Joan, or really telling ones, like an invite to stay at Peggy’s house that revealed more about Miss Olson than she’d like. The life of a pioneer isn’t easy, but Dawn’s perseverance and determination always gave you someone worth rooting for. Harry Hamlin in Mad Men

21) Jim Cutler

Played by: Harry Hamlin First Appearance: "The Flood" (Season 6, Episode 5) Sterling Cooper has rarely been without a troublemaker amidst its ranks, but few were as devious and clever as Jim Cutler. Witty as Roger but nowhere near as vain, and with a mind for business that outpaced Pete or Don, Cutler masterfully insinuated himself into the driver’s seat at SC&P, managing to turn Joan and Bert against Don. Harry Hamlin made Cutler a guy you loved to hate - plus his access to a Dr. Feelgood made him someone you wanted to party with too. And unlike other schemers, Cutler managed to exit the agency in a gold parachute, not disgrace. Melinda Page Hamilton in Mad Men

20) Anna Draper

Played by: Melinda Page Hamilton First Appearance: "The Gold Violin" (Season 2, Episode 7) Dick Whitman hit the identity theft jackpot with Don Draper. Not only was the real Mrs. Draper willing to let Dick keep up the sham, but she would grow to be one of his closest and truest friends. In Don’s own words, Anna was the only person who ever really knew him, and she represents all the better angels of his nature that get buried by booze and ennui. Kind, optimistic, and compassionate, Anna is so sanctified that even her untimely death comes with the implication that she’s moving on to a better existence. Her ghostly appearance in “The Suitcase” should be ridiculous, but it makes for one of the most eerie and unforgettable images of the entire series. Rich Sommer in Mad Men

19) Harry Crane

Played by: Rich Sommer First Appearance: "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" (Season 1, Episode 1) Harry’s evolution into perhaps the most obnoxious person at SC&P is an achievement built out of small beginnings. As just a simple media buyer, he started off as one of the more tolerable suits at the office. But shortly after he got his hands on the television department, the power started going to his head. He’d cock-up using that power in ways that were often embarrassing and laughable, and part of you has to admire Harry’s ability to bounce back from every self-inflicted humiliation. But the greedier and seedier he became, the more comfortable he felt throwing his weight around the office. The innocuous Harry Crane of old was eventually subsumed by one no less foolish, but certainly more entitled. When Jim Cutler calls Harry the most dishonest person he’s ever met, you know there’s no hope for the guy. At least he’s McCann Erikson’s headache now. Maggie Siff in Mad Men

18) Rachel Menken

Played by: Maggie Siff First Appearance: "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" (Season 1, Episode 1) The only client Don ever got into bed with, Rachel had to battle against many preconceptions as the head of Menken’s Department Store. As a single, business-minded Jewish woman, respect for her was based on inherited wealth, and earned by being more demanding and assertive than was considered acceptable at the time. It’s no wonder Don became captivated by her, and though she eventually proved the feeling was mutual, she was also smart enough to jump Don’s sinking ship at the first sign of trouble. Doing so meant that her unexpectedly short life was spent shared as part of a real family, instead of just Don’s escape plan. James Wolk in Mad Men

17) Bob Benson

Played by: James Wolk First Appearance: "The Doorway, Part 1" (Season 6, Episode 1) One-season wonders don’t get more memorable than James Wolk as Bob Benson, the mysterious, ingratiating junior account man. Better at greasing wheels than Pete, and with more secrets to hide than even Don, Bob spent most of Season 6 as an object of office and audience suspicion. Even as he worked to diffuse coworker tension, or lend Joan a helping hand, you kept wondering what the guy’s endgame ways. Turns out (assuming he didn’t conspire with Manolo to off Pete’s mom) Bob was just as clean-cut and friendly as he appeared, just with a falsified background, and a sexual orientation that put his job at risk. That Wolk couldn’t stick around to further detail Bob’s backstory seems a missed opportunity, but as a walking enigma, Bob, and his short-shorts, left a lasting impression on Mad Men. Jay R. Ferguson in Mad Men

16) Stan Rizzo

Played by: Jay R. Ferguson First Appearance: "Waldorf Stories" (Season 4, Episode 6) One of the most fruitful additions to Mad Men: The New Class, Rizzo replaced Sal as the agency’s art director when it moved to the Time and Life building, but played a very different role on the show. Stan started as a sexist blowhard for Peggy to butt heads with, but their interactions quickly developed into one of the sweetest friendships of the series. Once he toned down on the braggadocio (and started growing his awesome beard), Stan became a great utility character, both as a slacker wingman to Ginsberg, and encouraging shoulder for Peggy. He was one of the few people at SCDP who seemed to enjoy what he did for a living, and the positive attitude was often infectious. jessica pare in Mad Men

15) Megan Calvet

Played by: Jessica Paré First Appearance: "Christmas Comes But Once a Year" (Season 4, Episode 2) Warm and hip where Betty was frigid and traditional, Megan gave Don a second wife as unlike his first as humanly possible. Too bad he was the same Don, so the moment she expressed an ambition in something other than homemaking or advertising, he started checking out. Working against Megan were acting skills that rarely rose above “soap opera worthy,” and youthful inexperience that made her prone to bouts of entitlement and melodramatic self-pity. Also, she had a really weird thing for spaghetti. It’s a little detail, but the woman was always five minutes away from serving, or offering to make pasta. Anyway, she got along great with Don’s kids, and did her best to keep her marriage together while pursuing a career of her own. The show’s interest in Megan seemed to fade with Don’s, but she had her fair share of great stories, whether saving the Heinz account over dinner, or bringing the earworm that is “Zou Bisou Bisou” to viewers everywhere. Kevin Rahm in Mad Men

14) Ted Chaough

Played by: Kevin Rahm First Appearance: "The Chrysanthemum and the Sword" (Season 4, Episode 5) Ted’s arc is an odd one. He’s introduced as a cocky rival to Don, regularly calling him out before Don even knows who Ted is. Maybe getting tricked by Don into embarrassing himself in front of Honda gave him the gift of humility, as by the time Peggy joins CGC, he’s possessed by a much smaller ego. Still competitive with Don when they’re both chasing Chevy, Ted jumps into bed with him all the same, and SC&P is born. Ted’s presented as being a pretty copacetic guy (“groovy,” as he might say), and his blossoming romance with Peggy starts promising…until you remember he has a wife and two kids. By the time he’s moved out to California, what love for advertising he ever had is all gone, only to be reinvigorated by the McCann Erikson purchase. Rather than being existentially exhausted by his work like Don, Ted ends up a carefree cog in someone else’s machine, which is about as close to a happy ending as we can expect for anyone on Mad Men. Ben Feldman in Mad Men

13) Michael Ginsberg

Played by: Ben Feldman First Appearance: "Tea Leaves" (Season 5, Episode 3) The Sterling Cooper of 1960 wouldn’t have let a screwball like Ginsberg in the door, let alone apply for a job. Even by 1966, his extroversion nearly prevents him from getting a gig as a part-time copywriter. But Ginsberg quickly established himself as one of the deftest creative minds at SCDP, cracking the Jaguar campaign wide open, and submitting work good enough to make Don jealous. The seeds of Michael’s eventual mental breakdown were planted early in “Far Away Places,” his unfiltered demeanor seemingly a coping mechanism from his tragic upbringing. Ginsberg contributed many distinctive lines and moments to Mad Men’s history, so much so that his departure last year felt almost premature. Then again, being taken away in a stretcher because you gave your boss your amputated nipple is one hell of a way to go. Alison Brie in Mad Men

12) Trudy Campbell

Played by: Alison Brie First Appearance: "New Amsterdam" (Season 1, Episode 4) From the minute you discover what a spineless worm Pete Campbell is in Mad Men’s pilot, you feel bad for the unseen woman that’s agreed to marry him. What’s amazing about Trudy is how she shucked the charity case designation, and instead became a woman who knew what she wanted, and how to get it, despite her husband’s failings. Trudy was a natural fit for home life, but proved more ruthless than her husband when it came to protecting the family’s future. Pete should have known that stepping out on Trudy was like running with scissors. Her evisceration of Pete in the divorce was satisfying, but that the two have reconciled somewhat over the years shows there’s a real bond between the two extending beyond a shared appreciation for the Charleston. d6898727-e1ab-51c5-7c70-daaa73770dd7_MadMen102A_0167.JPG

11) Salvatore Romano

Played by: Bryan Batt First Appearance: "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" (Season 1, Episode 1) Sterling Cooper’s dry and dapper art director, Sal is about the only creative entity at the old office that Don doesn’t ritually abuse. Perhaps it’s his age, or his talent, but the mutual respect between the two is almost certainly what made Don look the other way when he found out Sal was gay. Of course, Don threw all that respect out the window when Sal refused to sleep with Lee Garner Jr., swiftly illustrating why it is Sal struggled with his orientation for so long. Despite his success as the agency’s art man and aspiring in-house commercial director, Sal’s unexpected early exit has made his potential return something Weiner has had to shoot down in interview after interview. Next time, maybe don’t strand one of your most sympathetic and unique characters in a phone booth, Weiner! Jared Harris in Mad Men

10) Lane Pryce

Played by: Jared Harris First Appearance: "Out of Town" (Season 3, Episode 1) Lane was no doubt honored to be the only employee from PPL to make the transition from Sterling Cooper to SCDP, but staying with the agency would ultimately lead him to end his life. Lane may have been stodgy, but he was one of the few guys who seemed satisfied with the good life when it presented itself. Granted, all it took were some marital and financial troubles for him to pursue an affair and commit fraud, but Lane’s mostly-chivalrous conduct is what made him likeable, if completely unfit for the advertising business. In his time, he did manage to knock Pete out in a boardroom boxing match, and his failed suicide-by-Jaguar remains one of cleverest moments in Mad Men history. His death in “Commissions and Fees” cast a pall over the remainder of Season 6, and much of the rest of the series, but its because of his timid exterior that he was able to surprise you so often. If you had to choose someone in the office to get wasted with and watch a Godzilla movie, would it be Lane? No, and that’s why you’d be missing out. Aaron Staton in Mad Men

9) Ken Cosgrove

Played by: Aaron Stanton First Appearance: "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" (Season 1, Episode 1) “You look like a spy,” Roger Sterling recently said of Ken Cosgrove. Indeed, Ken has many spy-like qualities, including numerous aliases (Ben Hargrove and Dave Algonquin being his nom de plumes), a few secret talents, and an unfortunate tendency of having guns pointed/shot in his face. His likely homophobia aside, Ken might be the single nicest guy to ever work at Sterling Cooper (and almost certainly McCann Erikson). He promised to help piggyback Peggy onto any career moves he might make, is loyal to his wife, and exceeds as an account man without resorting to the nepotism Pete relies on. It’s what makes his eventual heel-turn at the end of the series both incredibly satisfying, and thoroughly dispiriting. An eye for an eye isn’t a healthy attitude to endorse, but the only way Ken’s long-delayed revenge could have been any sweeter is if he had tap danced out of that last meeting with Roger and Pete. Robert Morse in Mad Men

8) Bert Cooper

Played by: Robert Morse First Appearance: "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" (Season 1, Episode 1) The guiding hand of Sterling Cooper was a rather peculiar specimen, as Bert Cooper’s mind for business seemed to run counter to his many eccentricities. Sure, he loved Ayn Rand, and bought paintings for resale instead of artistic value, but senior partners with a fetish for Japanese culture and open-toe footwear are a rarity. Even for someone his age, Bert had the air of a man wise beyond his years (if still behind the times on matters of race), dispensing erudite wisdom and amused commentary like a Madison Avenue Yoda. His passing in “Waterloo,” while sad, gave us one of Mad Men’s greatest flights of fancy, a soft shoe number by Bert reminding Don that the best things in life are free. So bravo to you, Bert Cooper, you weird, wonderful, testicle-less creature. January Jones in Mad Men

7) Betty Hofstadt Draper/Francis

Played by: January Jones First Appearance: "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" (Season 1, Episode 1) There’s no Team Betty. Even people who openly support the character often do so at arm’s length. Betty, and January Jones’ performance of her are withholding, and seemingly limited. As the mitochondrial ancestor to AMC’s brand of divisive wives, Betty could be viewed simplistically as a shrew and a harpy, particularly as later seasons of Mad Men seemed to struggle to find a use for her. But during those first three seasons, and particularly this last one, Jones and the writers brought a lot of depth to Betty as she learned to view herself as more than just a daughter, or a housewife. The last season of Mad Men has been about rising above life’s disappointments, and finding graceful acceptance of what you’ve been given. Few made that lesson feel as earned as Betty, and learning to embrace her made for one of Mad Men’s toughest, but ultimately most rewarding demands. Kiernan Shipka in Mad Men

6) Sally Draper

Played by: Kiernan Shipka First Appearance: "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" (Season 1, Episode 1) Even when comparing where Don, Peggy, and the rest of New York were in 1960 versus where they’d be by 1971, it’s no surprise that a kid growing up during that period would come out the other end the most radically changed person. What maybe is surprising is how gradually Sally Draper turned into one of Mad Men’s best characters, and Kiernan Shipka one of its best performers. As she wrestled with Don and Betty’s divorce, and the terrifying prospect of really being her parents’ daughter, Sally experienced an upbringing not as insulated as her mother, or hard-luck as her father. She could be a naïve brat just as easily as she could be an unexpectedly mature and sensitive adolescent, and Sally came to embody the real legacy that her parents, and their generation were going to leave behind. So many shows ignore or simplify their teenage characters, but Sally’s journey through Mad Men was one of constant discovery and growth. Vincent Kartheiser in Mad Men

5) Pete Campbell

Played by: Vincent Kartheiser First Appearance: "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" (Season 1, Episode 1) “Not great, Bob!” “The clients want to live too, Ted!” “The king ordered it!” All worthy entries on any list of memorable TV outbursts, and all owed to one Peter Campbell. That our memories of Pete are so often dominated by small moments of comic indignity ignores the markedly different man Pete became over the course of the series. As a toady Don-wannabe who knocked up Peggy before marrying Trudy, Pete was the first season’s most loathsome regular. Over the course of the series he did many awful things in his personal and professional life, but rather than judging him, Mad Men often viewed Pete with a sense of great pity. Despite his exceptional (if sometimes underhanded) business acumen, he was a perpetual office whipping boy – not that we didn’t delight in watching Roger and company knock him down a peg on the regular. Eventually, most viewers warmed to Pete because he, unlike many other characters, seemed to learn from past mistakes. In the end, Pete made peace with how different from Don he was, and was all the better for it. Besides, it’s not like Don could ever do a pratfall this incredible. Christina Hendricks in Mad Men

4) Joan Holloway

Played by: Christina Hendricks First Appearance: "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" (Season 1, Episode 1) Queen B of the office, Joan’s career can be viewed as an unstoppable success story. From young divorcee, to secretary, to office manager, to Madison Avenue partner in less than twenty years, Joan’s C.V. reads as confidently as her exterior. Of course, both hide a much more complicated history and person than appearances let on. Even if she made running an agency and castrating office clods look effortless, big things in Joan’s life never came easy. Her son was made with a man other than her awful second husband, and getting a partnership rarely granted her the respect she struggled to achieve. So many great scenes on Mad Men just needed to put Joan in a room with Roger, Don, or Peggy; sparks proceeding to fly was a given. But her own story is one of embattled perseverance through some of the worst harassment and mistreatment a woman in her position could face at the time. Joan’s a survivor, through and through, and that she made it to the finish line with a son she loves, a handsome new beau, and set for life is the least we should have expected for her. John Slattery in Mad Men

3) Roger Sterling

Played by: John Slattery First Appearance: "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" (Season 1, Episode 1) Has a more quotable TV character graced our screens since Roger Sterling first sauntered into Don’s office, and introduced himself as the gold standard of Mad Men repartee? He’s the sort of man you’d follow to hell and back – assuming the devil would let such a sharp-tongued conversationalist out of his company. Whether offering his well-sauced insights to any and all that would listen, or chasing women younger than some of the bottles in his magnificent office bar, Roger’s antics were worth keeping up with through every wisecrack and coronary. Like many a handsome clown, though, Roger’s debauched exterior wore thinner and thinner with each year, as new marriages and moments of clarity inevitably lead him back into another bar, or another bed. Roger may learn too late to appreciate what he has, rather than grasp at what he’s losing, but following him on his quest for fulfillment was one of Mad Men’s greatest pleasures. “Don’t you love the chase?” He once asked Don. When you led the way, Roger, we sure did. Jon Hamm in Mad Men

2) Don Draper

Played by: Jon Hamm First Appearance: "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" (Season 1, Episode 1) Don Draper is a prince. Don Draper is a monster. Don Draper is a visionary. Don Draper is a shyster. Don Draper is God’s gift to women. Don Draper is the world’s unloved son. He’s a man of wealth and taste, and the one on TV telling you how white your shirts can be. He’s Roger Thornhill and Rosemary’s baby, the man given a new identity that can’t escape his demons. He was a monument to one generation, and a relic to the next. Over the run of Mad Men, the persona that was “Don Draper” gave way to the damaged, desperate man he though he’d left back in Korea. As his flaws became more evident to viewers at home and those around him, it became clear that the man called Don Draper was nothing more than a magic trick. People chose not to question Don’s charade for fear of finding themselves hiding behind the curtain. We know the illusion of this handsome, brilliant, unstoppable man isn’t real, but buying into Don Draper means buying into the idea that anyone can really be okay. Where Don will finally end up remains a mystery. Where he’s taken us is through one of the most mystifying, revealing, and contradictory lives in TV history. Elisabeth Moss in Mad Men

1) Peggy Olson

Played by: Elisabeth Moss First Appearance: "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" (Season 1, Episode 1) Hail Margaret, full of grace. Look, if the above paragraph says anything, it’s that we all want to be Don Draper – at least, the version of him that Don kept up, before slowly shedding the identity like a snake’s skin. But that guy doesn’t exist. At our best, most of us can just try to be Peggy, someone given a life without expectations, but damned if they’re going to let it go to waste. She’s far from a perfect person, subject to the same insecurities and foibles as anyone else. That she routinely found success in spite of those faults, and sexist institutional structures, made every win for Peggy a win for the underdogs. Few of us will ever have the luxury of Don’s comfortable odyssey into solipsism, but Peggy fought tooth and nail for every inch of the life she made, mistakes and all. It wasn’t always roller-skating and slow dances with Don, but Peggy’s journey through Mad Men is the one you can point to as something worth aspiring towards. That being on that journey meant following a woman as willful, charming, brilliant, and human as Peggy made her not Mad Men’s most iconic character, but its best." ["post_title"]=> string(30) "The Top 100 Mad Men Characters" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(112) "There have been many great characters on Mad Men over the years, and we've set out to pick the 100 best of them." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(26) "top-100-characters-mad-men" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-05-19 08:38:35" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-19 13:38:35" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=428415" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [7]=> object(WP_Post)#384 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(428616) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "269" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-05-13 13:39:10" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-13 18:39:10" ["post_content"]=> string(8833) "There are few contemporary franchises with the (surprising) longevity of the Fast and Furious franchise. The most recent instalment, Furious 7, seemed to put a pretty strong capper on the whole narrative, tying up many loose ends from other films. Letty regained her memory, Dom punched out his adversary, and Brian drove off into the sunset. The family was reunited, but ended on a melancholy note as Dom and Brian finally, inevitably, part ways. With Fast & Furious 8 announced already, one does wonder where the franchise can go from here. Join us as we take a look at several things that the next outing in this high-octane series will have to keep in mind should it hope to be as successful as its predecessors have been.

The Loss of Brian

Fast-Furious-7 Part of the challenge in Fast & Furious 8 is the quiet removal of Paul Walker’s character Brian. Furious 7 paid a warm and loving tribute to the deceased Walker and his place in the franchise, allowing Brian to drive off from Dom and back to his wife and son. We can hope that Fast & Furious 8 will not go the easy route and eliminate Brian off-screen, thus forcing Dom and Co. back into the running to avenge his death. That would undermine the good work Furious 7 did in treating Walker’s death with gentleness and respect. But no matter what, Walker’s absence will have to be dealt with, as Brian was such a major facet of the franchise. There is already a rumor circulating that Walker’s brother Cody – who did some stand-in work for those parts of Furious 7 that Walker was unable complete – will be coming on board Fast & Furious 8, though whether he’ll actually be playing Brian is unclear. It’s perfectly possible to recast Brian, though that runs into the same feeling of hokiness that Furious 7 worked so hard to avoid. But what about bringing on the other Walker as a new straight-shooter – perhaps a brother or family member that Brian never spoke about – to cause a bit of an upheaval in the Toretto family? That would at least avoid the inevitable comparisons and questions of respect for Walker’s death.

The Racing

fast-and-furious-2001-06-g As awesome as it was, one of the major elements missing from Furious 7 was one of the stronger components of earlier entries: street-racing. Lest we forget that Dom and his gang are racers, first and foremost, and while I am always up for seeing cars parachuting onto mountain roads, and Dwayne Johnson downing helicopters with massive machine guns, I would love for a few scenes of proper street races once again. There was a hint of it with Letty’s racing sequence, but it did not have the same vitality of those early, hell-bent races that established the franchise in the first place. It would be nice for the Toretto clan to return to the streets, if only for a single, adrenaline fueled race.

The Law

Fast Five Now that Dom and Co. have worked for the government once, there’s a strong possibility it’ll happen again. With Kurt Russell’s Mr. Nobody still running around – and being a pretty cool badass himself – perhaps he shall call on the Toretto clan for another job. Vin Diesel has already teased the return of Russell for the next part of the franchise, though (naturally) has not said what kind of part he’ll play. The other side of law and order is Dwayne Johnson’s Special Agent Hobbs. Hobbs didn’t feature as a major player in Furious 7, although he did have several spectacular moments. He sat out most of the film, though, and it would be good to put him front and center once again. I personally would pump for Hobbs being in danger, perhaps even considered a traitor, and for Dom and the gang to have to get him out of it. It would give some more opportunity for Vin Diesel and the Rock to flex their muscles, and further build on the relationships between the characters as a “family” that looks after their own. Besides, we could have a comeback of Hobbs’s adorable daughter. Finally, we have to address the rumor that Eva Mendes’s character Monica Fuentes, a U.S. Customs agent, will be returning for the next installment. Monica appeared briefly in Fast Five, but her major film was the early sequel 2 Fast, 2 Furious. It’d be quite easy to write her back in, especially as the Toretto family now has more (somewhat tenuous) connections to law enforcement, and it would be nice to have another badass woman in the mix.

The Family

the-fast-and-the-furious-tokyo-drift_5fd31ef9 As we are reminded at least once or twice a film, the Fast and Furious franchise is all about family. The Toretto clan continues to expand, but there are a few who have not been featured in films for some time. With the absence of Brian, there might be a shift in focus on the tribulations of some of our other favorites, like Tyrese Gibson’s Roman or Ludacris’s inspired hacker Tej. Lucas Black, who featured in Tokyo Drift and very briefly in Furious 7, has already signed on to return to the franchise, which means that we could see more of his “cowboy” Sean Boswell and the interaction between him and his adoptive family. With the addition of brilliant hacker Mia, who seems to have joined the team at the end of Furious 7, there are all kinds of combinations we could have that don’t have to focus on the previously central characters of Dom and Brian. Not that Dom is going to go anywhere, of course. He’s the patriarch of this makeshift family, though his character trajectory might not have much further to go. Given that Letty (Michelle Rodriguez) has her memory back, the next logical step for the couple would be a child – and can you imagine Dom as a daddy? I certainly can.

The Villains

statham The franchise has been building quite a bevy of villains that really don’t like the Toretto family, many of whom are still alive after their run-ins with Dom and his gang. Lest we forget, Deckard and Owen Shaw (Jason Statham and Luke Evans) are still out there, one in prison and the other in a coma. This means that it’s the easiest thing in the world to bring one or both of them back for the next installment. They were some of the best villains the franchise has yet offered, but there are others too: there’s the “yakuza” of Tokyo, and the potential villainy of Kurt Russell’s Mr. Nobody to contend with as well. While too many villains will spoil the broth, uniting some of the previous villains for yet another film could produce some unique sparks. Of course, this franchise has succeeded in getting some pretty badass actors to play their villains, and there’s always a chance of adding someone else to the roster. Mel Gibson hasn’t been doing much recently…

Locations

fast-furious_2c854861 Fast and Furious has become known for its locations: drifting around Tokyo, jumping buildings in Abu Dhabi, destroying the streets of L.A. Recent reports seem to situate the Fast & Furious 8 in New York, which will undoubtedly present some unique challenges for the street racers. I would also advocate for sending our heroes to Rome for a little while. With the intense car culture of Italy, racing around the streets of Roma seems like a perfect opportunity for a film franchise centered around souped-up machines. We really need to pit some American muscle cars against sleek Italian supercars, and rip up some Roman streets while we’re at it." ["post_title"]=> string(50) "6 Things That Fast & Furious 8 Should Keep In Mind" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(42) "multiple-directions-fast-furious-franchise" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-05-13 13:39:10" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-13 18:39:10" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=428616" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [8]=> object(WP_Post)#383 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(425837) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "433" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-05-12 10:59:20" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-12 15:59:20" ["post_content"]=> string(71) "[gallery ids="420943,425840,425841,425845,425842,422241,425843,425844"]" ["post_title"]=> string(58) "Gallery: 7 Characters We Need To See In Daredevil Season 2" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(132) "From Punisher to Spider-Man, here are 7 key Marvel characters that we'd love to see show up on Daredevil when season 2 hits in 2016." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(39) "gallery-7-characters-daredevil-season-2" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-05-19 08:29:22" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-19 13:29:22" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=425837" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [9]=> object(WP_Post)#382 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(426480) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "370" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-05-11 13:47:57" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-11 18:47:57" ["post_content"]=> string(12931) "Avengers-Age-of-Ultron-Poster-header Avengers: Age of Ultron has Hulk-smashed its way through its first two weekends and is on track to be one of the year's most profitable pics, but there's much more at the multiplex than Marvel heroes this summer. In fact, looking at the lineup of reboots, sequels and slick blockbuster titles, 2015 is looking like one of the most sprawling summers for popcorn pleasures in ages. But what's really strange is how many of the most interesting titles have flown so far under the radar, dominated on social media by juggernaut films like Mad Max: Fury RoadTomorrowlandJurassic World and Ant-Man. On that note, here are my picks for the 10 movies you might not yet know about - but that you absolutely have to carve out the time to see if you want to get the most out of your cinema trips this summer.

10) Self/less (opens July 10, wide)

selfless The quote-unquote biggest movie on this list, The Cell director Tarsem Singh's sci-fi thriller Self/less has attracted shockingly little buzz in the months leading up to its plum summer release. It stars Ben Kingsley as a wealthy man dying from cancer, who undergoes an experimental procedure to transfer his mind into the supposedly vacant body of a younger man (Ryan Reynolds). As the man begins to discover where his new body came from, he learns that he has entered into a partnership with a nefarious organization that will kill to protect itself. Though most summer sci-fi offerings are veritable wastes of celluloid (see: LucyTranscendence), Ex Machina showed there's still an appetite for fresh, creative stories in the genre, and Self/less has a story that could surprise us all equally.

9) The Stanford Prison Experiment (opens July 17, limited)

the stanford prison experiment Reviews were strong on this psychological thriller, which screened at Sundance, and with the material on hand, that doesn't come as much of a surprise. The Stanford Prison Experiment, like all the most chilling thrillers these days, is based on a true story. In 1971, psychologist Philip Zimbardo (Billy Crudup here) paid university students to take on the roles of either prisoners or guards in an elaborate scenario designed to figure out how individuals responded to socially imposed power dynamics. The results weren't pretty, with abuses of the prisoners starting almost immediately. It's an intriguing story, to be sure, and director Kyle Patrick Alvarez is working with a killer cast here, including Ezra Miller, Olivia Thirlby, Nelsan Ellis, Ki Hong Lee, Tye Sheridan, Michael Angarano, Jack Kilmer and Nicholas Braun. That staggering lineup of up-and-comers is alone enough to make The Stanford Prison Experiment worth keeping an eye on.

8) Sleeping With Other People (opens Aug. 21, limited)

sleeping with other people Alison Brie is one of the most under-appreciated comic actresses working today, and it's absolutely shameful that she still has to be degraded for roles in mainstream fare (like the absolutely atrocious Get Hard). This summer might change all that, though - she stars with Jason Sudeikis in Sleeping with Other People, which is riding a wave of critical acclaim out of the 2015 Sundance Film Festival all the way to an August release date. Brie plays a serial cheater who embarks on a platonic relationship with a womanizer (Sudeikis) even as both of them start to catch the feels. With its stellar cast, also including Natasha Lyonne, Adam Scott and Amanda Peet, as well as a strong writer-director in Leslye Headland (BacheloretteAbout Last Night), this is looking like the sleeper hit comedy of the summer.

7) American Ultra (opens Aug. 21, limited)

jesse-stewart This one just announced its release date in time to be included, but the plot sounds so fascinating that it absolutely deserves a place on this list. Jesse Eisenberg (in his first of two appearances here) stars as a small-town stoner with an enigmatic past who gets caught up, along with his girlfriend (Kristen Stewart), in a vast government operation intended to wipe him off the face of the Earth. American Ultra doesn't have a trailer or even any official stills yet, but it boasts a talented scribe in Chronicle writer Max Landis and an intriguing directorial choice in Nima Nourizadeh (Project X). Additionally, with a supporting cast including Walton Goggins, Bill Pullman, Topher Grace, Connie Britton, John Leguizamo and Tony Hale, this is definitely going to be the most fun summer movie of them all for sharp-eyed television aficionados.

6) Southpaw (opens July 24, wide)

Southpaw Jake Gyllenhaal wasn't looking so good the last time we saw him (in Dan Gilroy's Nightcrawler), and now, he's transformed again, albeit in the opposite direction, for Antoine Fuqua's boxing drama Southpaw, bulking up so completely that he's almost unrecognizable. It makes us wonder why more people aren't raving about how excited they are to see the pic, as opposed to summer fluff like the new Mission: Impossible and Pixels? Regardless, Southpaw should be on every dutiful cinephile's list - Gyllenhaal stars as a tormented boxer grieving the death of his wife (Rachel McAdams). When his self-destructive behavior causes child protection services to take his child, he struggles to get his life back on track with the help of an accomplished trainer (Forest Whitaker). It sounds like one of the few movies of the summer that we could be talking about during awards season.

5) The Gallows (opens July 10, wide)

the gallows Never underestimate the infinite wisdom of Jason Blum. The horror-happy producer has delivered hit after hit in recent years, with Paranormal ActivityInsidiousSinister and Unfriended under his belt, and this summer, he'll be sneaking another under-the-radar frightener into theaters with The Gallows. We only got the first teaser for the found-footage flick recently, but it successfully scared the bejeesus out of at least this writer. Set in high school, the film centers on a group of kids who try to restage a play that ended in tragedy for one cast member years earlier. Things don't go so well, though. The filmmakers, Travis Cluff and Chris Lofing, are unknowns, and there's been little publicity for this one, but I'm prepping for a genuinely scary pic and can't wait to see how it turns out.

4) Me & Earl & the Dying Girl (opens June 12, wide)

me-and-earl-and-the-dying-girl-thomas-mann Every summer has its indie darling knockout. Last summer, it was either Boyhood or Chef, depending on who you ask. The year before, it was The Kings of Summer, without a doubt. And in the summer of 2015, it seems pretty certain that Me & Earl & the Dying Girl has that title on lockdown. It earned a standing ovation at Sundance along with the Grand Jury Prize for Drama, where our own Dominic Mill awarded it the site's top rating of five stars. The pic, which centers on a pair of teenagers who decide to make a movie for their leukemia-stricken friend, is destined for great things, and though a lot of audiences may be diverted by the shinier attractions in the coming months, Me & Earl & the Dying Girl seems like one of the summer's real must-sees.

3) Mr. Holmes (opens July 17, limited)

[ctv-1] All Sherlocked out, are you? Try this deer-stalker on for size - Sir Ian McKellen takes on the role of Baker Street's most legendary detective, who is facing the end of days after a lengthy career of solving mysteries the world over. With his mental functions slowly but surely leaving him, Holmes revisits the one case he could never solve, in hopes of laying one demon to rest before he passes on, only to find himself grappling with much larger questions of love and life. This is a far cry from the heartthrob Holmeses that Robert Downey Jr. and Benedict Cumberbatch brought to life in recent years, but Mr. Holmes looks like a classy, clever addition to the literary icon's filmography. It's certainly not a blockbuster and, sandwiched in between Jurassic World and Inside Out, it may not find a big audience - but something tells me that the film is going to be well-worth the price of admission.

2) The End of the Tour (opens July 31, limited)

the end of the tour I caught this transcendent flick at this year's Independent Film Festival Boston, and if anything is right in the world, you'll be hearing a lot more about it as the Oscar race heats up. Jason Segel is revelatory as author David Foster Wallace, whose conversations with journalist Dave Lipsky (Jesse Eisenberg, terrific) during a 1996 book tour for his bestselling Infinite Jest make up the backbone of director James Ponsoldt's insightful film. But The End of the Tour is about so much more than Wallace - it's about the ideas that propelled him forward, that haunted and hypnotized him, that made him simultaneously embrace and detest the eyes of millions. Credit Pulitzer Prize winner Donald Margulies for a script worthy of comparisons to Richard Linklater's Before trilogy in how it draws profundity out of honest and raw conversation.

1) Dope (opens June 19, limited)

Dope3 Here we are - Dope is going to be the sleeper hit of this summer, I'm calling it now. An audience fave at Sundance, it's attracting nothing but terrific buzz leading up to its June bow, and the young stars have the makings of real breakouts. Refreshingly, this is one film set in the ghetto that doesn't focus on how terrible life there is, but more on the young people who want to get out, attend college and go on to do bigger and better things. Star Shameik Moore plays a high school geek named Malcolm, who winds up in possession of a backpack filled with drugs, and that's just the catalyst for all the crazy adventures, chases and shenanigans that he and his friends get caught up in. Energetic, bursting with young talent and seemingly packed with pop culture references, Dope is definitely shaping up to be the go-to cool movie of the summer, and it absolutely deserves a place atop this list." ["post_title"]=> string(54) "Top 10 Must-See Summer Movies You Don't Know About Yet" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(787) "Avengers: Age of Ultron has Hulk-smashed its way through its first two weekends and is on track to be one of the year's most profitable pics, but there's much more at the multiplex than Marvel heroes this summer. In fact, looking at the lineup of reboots, sequels and slick blockbuster titles, 2015 is looking like one of the most sprawling summers for popcorn pleasures in ages. But what's really strange is how many of the most interesting titles have flown so far under the radar, dominated on social media by juggernaut films like Mad Max: Fury Road, Tomorrowland, Jurassic World and Ant-Man. Here are my picks for the 10 movies you might not yet know about - but that you absolutely have to carve out the time to see if you want to get the most out of your cinema trips this summer." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(28) "top-10-mustsee-summer-movies" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-05-19 08:20:18" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-19 13:20:18" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=426480" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [10]=> object(WP_Post)#379 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(426867) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "506" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-05-07 13:25:43" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-07 18:25:43" ["post_content"]=> string(9150) "jackbeats2014promo As festival season ramped up over the last month, so did EDM releases. With dayclubs opening their doors for business and the number of DJ sets going at any given time seeing a substantial spike, the amount of music released by artists across the globe is on the rise as well. This April saw standout tracks from the likes of Nero, Jack Beats, FTampa and Kungs, among others, and they ranged from trance to dubstep and almost everything in between. Take a look at our 10 favorite songs from last month and let us know what you think in the comments section. Are there any that we missed, or do you agree with all of our picks?

1) NERO - Between II Worlds

UK dubstep trio NERO have kept fans waiting for four long years for their second studio album, Between II Worlds. With a summer release date quickly approaching though, the group dropped the title track last month and it sufficiently captures the feeling of the effort. The halftime drum patterns of dubstep paired with synth work somehow contributes to the stagnant creative pool that the genre has become. It's another excellent piece of work from NERO and one that points to a very promising upcoming album.

2) Marc Houle - Business (M.A.N.D.Y. Remix)

Marc Houle's December release of "Business" struck a chord with minimal techno enthusiasts the world over - not the least of whom M.A.N.D.Y., who gave the track their own tech house makeover. The Berlin-based duo co-founded Get Physical Records alongside house tastemakers Booka Shade and DJ T a decade ago, giving them sufficient credentials to give "Business" their own spin. If you're looking for more underground flavor in your day-to-day playlist, then cue this minimal groove up.

3) Autograf - Dream

Tropical house has made for a particularly soothing subset of what's being called "the deep house movement." Autograf have made their own distinctive mark on the genre, and their newest track, "Dream," is no exception. The first of numerous upcoming releases, the track combines serene instrumentals with a calming vocal sample that makes us look forward to what the trio will put out in the months to follow.

4) What So Not - Gemini ft. George Maple

Nobody was happy to hear that Flume would be leaving Australian outfit What So Not, but Emoh Instead appears to be dealing with his absence well. His latest release, "Gemini," makes for memorable midtempo, and vocals by George Maple tie all the elements together. In typical Flume/What So Not fashion, this song falls somewhat outside the confines of popular EDM genres while still retaining enough mass appeal to sneak into your Pandora stream.

5) Jack Beats - One Love

British duo Jack Beats hit the nail on the head with this contemplative future house track. The rubbery organ synth and brooding vocals perfectly compliment the dark chord progression, which builds to a frenetic peak. While the OWSLA art in the background image may have ruffled a few feathers, the song itself will undoubtedly become a staple over the next several months as festival season goes full swing.

6) FTampa - That Drop

Big room house isn't dead. At least not if Hardwell's record label, Revealed Recordings, has anything to say about it. Ftampa's latest track, "That Drop," proves that hard kicks and, of course, heavy bass drops still leave much to be explored. The producer's attention to detail makes the tune a fitting addition to the rest of Revealed Recordings' releases, and likely one that will see its fair share of inclusion into sets throughout the festival circuit.

7) Cheb Five - The Only

Sao Paulo, Brazil artist Cheb Five has been climbing the electro house charts as of late. His newest number, "The Only," showcases his impressive production chops and has landed on the Beatport electro house chart's #53 spot. This track in particular demonstrates why electro house never falls off the charts: because innovators like Cheb Five keep on finding new avenues to explore within its confines.

8) Jauz - Feel The Volume Pt. II ft. Fatman Scoop (VIP Mix)

Jauz captured the world's attention with last year's "Feel The Volume," and he further showcases the track's versatility with this new VIP mix. Vocal samples by Fatman Scoop and a brand-new dubstep breakdown definitely make us see the song in a new light and have pushed it right back onto our favorite playlists. We could have picked something newer than the VIP mix of a track that came out last year, but "Feel The Volume" had such a game-changing sound that it's worth it - if for no other reason than to expose the original song to an even wider audience.

9) Ferry Corsten - Exhale ft. Armin Van Buuren

With trance heavyweights Ferry Corsten and Armin Van Buuren together on a track, you know it's gonna be a slam dunk - and the upbeat stylings of "Exhale" do not disappoint. Even though both artists have become synonymous with trance's more contemporary and mainstream-friendly sound, the higher tempo and sharper synth work here will no doubt resonate with those who took part in the genre's golden era. If you're a longtime fan of either Ferry or Armin, definitely check this one out.

10) Axwell /\ Ingrosso - On My Way (Kungs Remix)

If the cookie-cutter progressive house style of "On My Way" didn't suit your fancy, you might want to give the Kungs remix a listen. The deep house version is almost impossible to identify, but retains much of the original's playability. Anyone who appreciates EDM's softer side will undoubtedly enjoy this version of "On My Way," even as memorable as the original track was in its own right." ["post_title"]=> string(38) "Our Favorite EDM Songs From April 2015" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(281) "As festival season ramped up over the last month, so did EDM releases. This April saw standout tracks from the likes of Nero, Jack Beats, FTampa and Kungs - ranging from trance to dubstep. Give our April 2015 picks a listen and tell us what you think in the comments section below." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(33) "10-favorite-edm-tracks-april-2015" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-05-19 08:36:14" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-19 13:36:14" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=426867" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [11]=> object(WP_Post)#378 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(425559) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "389" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-05-06 09:42:32" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-06 14:42:32" ["post_content"]=> string(27607) "female-movie-director The conversation about the lack of female directors in Hollywood has been rumbling on for what seems like forever, but that conversation has now found itself at a crucial point. At long last, people are beginning to get specific. After decades of vague allusions to a seemingly intangible, invisible issue, the conversation is finally becoming louder, and less easy to dismiss as the supposedly irrational ramblings of radical feminism. This is thanks to the visible activism of those concerned about the situation – on social media and within the film industry itself. It is also thanks to organizations such as the Female Filmmakers Initiative – launched by the Sundance Institute and Women In Film Los Angeles – which commissioned a vital study into the barriers and opportunities facing independent filmmakers, who try to engage in filmmaking while female. This research was a three year study, conducted by The Media, Diversity & Social Change (MDSC) Initiative at USC's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism (@MDSCInitiative), and the findings of the third and final phase of it were recently delivered in a powerful and disturbing report. As it stands, the current situation is entirely nonsensical. We know that, statistically, just as many women go to film school as men do, for example. We know that, statistically, just as many women complete their independent films and get them into the festival circuit. So, where are they? In mainstream Hollywood, why do the names of only two or three female directors spring to the minds of most audience members? More importantly – given that it is now 2015 – why is it still assumed that men will direct the high-profile, big-budget projects, to the extent that the hiring of a woman for such a thing is headline news? There are several points to highlight here. First of all, there are those two or three female directors that more easily spring to mind – probably Kathryn Bigelow (the only female in history to win an Oscar for Best Director), Ava DuVernay (because she was in the news this year), and maybe Michelle MacLaren (because she was in the news even more recently). You might even think of Angelina Jolie or Patty Jenkins for the same news-based reasons. These are examples of names that are wheeled out as evidence that progress is being made. Of course, one woman winning an actual Oscar for Best Director is better than none, but that can hardly be characterized as ‘progress’ when the recent Female Filmmakers Initiative report found that “The prevalence of females decreases notably when moving from independent to mainstream film,” and that that gap has doubled in size since 2002. No – that’s the opposite of progress. Secondly, it is very much headline news when a woman is actually hired to direct a high-profile, big-budget project – as demonstrated by the recent staff shuffling on the upcoming Wonder Woman film. Michelle MacLaren left the project due to ‘creative differences,’ and was swiftly replaced by Patty Jenkins. Cue vast celebrations about how Wonder Woman will save us all from a fate worse than gender discrimination. Unfortunately, that cannot be the case when the same studio (Warner Bros, with DC) actively uses the film to perpetuate the limiting of female talent to its newly commissioned female-led projects. The same thing is happening over at Disney, with Marvel, as they purposefully seek a female director for Captain Marvel, while failing to hire (or possibly even consider) female directors for male-led projects. Patty Jenkins was hired for Thor: The Dark World, you say? Yes, but that didn’t work out, did it? kathryn-bigelow-bin-laden-thriller-zero-dark-thirty The issue here is equality of opportunity. It is a stark and clear fact that many of the male directors hired for high-profile, big-budget film franchise opportunities were, at the time, either no more qualified than their female counterparts, or demonstrably less qualified. If this were the case in a handful of examples, the argument that perhaps they were simply the best-suited for the job – in terms of vision and understanding – might hold water. In reality, when it happens as often as it does, it is actually a trend that highlights the institutional sexism inherent in mainstream filmmaking. A case often cited in support of this argument is that of Joe and Anthony Russo, who were hired to direct Captain America: The Winter Soldier after a couple of middling performance comedy films and the rest of their time spent directing episodes of sitcoms. The Russo brothers are not exceptional in this regard, however. Josh Trank, for example, directed five episodes of The Kill Point for television, before making the well-received independent film Chronicle. He was then handed the upcoming re-boot of Fantastic Four. Similarly, Rian Johnson went from Brick, The Brothers Bloom, Looper and three episodes of Breaking Bad, to being the director of two planned Star Wars sequels. Thor: The Dark World is a fascinating case study. Award-winning director Patty Jenkins was initially hired to helm the sequel, which would have made her the second female director of a Marvel movie – the first being Lexi Alexander with Punisher: War Zone in 2008. However, Jenkins dropped out shortly afterward, due to ‘creative differences’ and was replaced by Alan Taylor. Taylor had spent the previous 20 years directing mainly television – including Oz, Homicide: Life On The Street, The West Wing, Six Feet Under, Lost, Deadwood, The Sopranos, Mad Men, Nurse Jackie, Boardwalk Empire and Game Of Thrones. On the strength of his Thor sequel, he was hired for Terminator: Genisys. For every Alan Taylor, there are countless female directors with incredibly similar experience – up to the point of being hired for giant movie franchises, of course. This is why it is important that the conversation about the lack of female directors becomes more visible now - because, with studios announcing their planned release slates for the next five years, there are dozens of franchise opportunities currently without a director. At the moment, the big studios seem intent on hiring female directors for female-led stories only, so it is vital to publicly scrutinize the hiring processes being demonstrated. This doesn’t mean dispensing with appreciation for good filmmaking, just because it comes from a man – but it does mean asking why a woman wasn’t given the same opportunity. For example, while recently extolling the virtues of the undeniably well-crafted Daredevil miniseries on Netflix, how many people also bothered to highlight the fact that there were no females whatsoever involved in the directing of its 13 episodes? The same issue exists with series such as Bloodline. Both titles have been renewed, and would greatly benefit from a move to hire some female directors (and more female writers) - not least because it would mean the development of female characters other than those defined by the male gaze. Thor: Ragnarok, Captain Marvel, Black Panther, Inhumans, Shazam!, Cyborg, Green Lantern, the untitled sequel to Terminator: Genisys, the later two stand-alone Star Wars spin-off movies, Fast & Furious 8, James Bond 25, The Chronicles Of Narnia: The Silver Chair – these are just a few of the franchise instalments either currently up for grabs, or imminently due to begin development. The simple fact is that if equality of opportunity actually existed in mainstream filmmaking, there would be as many female directors under consideration for those films as male directors – and as many winning the job. But there aren’t. The greatest fallacy of all is that gender equality is difficult to achieve, and that we just need to ‘be patient’. It’s a fallacy, because all that is needed is for studios to hire directors that are female. That’s it - and they’re not difficult to find. Here, for example, are 12 female directors currently working in television, who are talented, qualified and have earned a franchise opportunity - because, having dominated the small screen with their episodic instalments for years, franchise film is the next logical step.

Wendey Stanzler

[ctv-1] Stanzler is one of those highly qualified, award-winning, Emmy nominated filmmakers who has experience across a number of production departments. Starting out in editing, she was Sound Editor on 1985’s Stryker’s War, starring Sam Raimi, before stepping up to Editor with Michael Moore’s Roger & Me in 1989. Editing a variety of projects over the years – including 1993’s The Last Party, 1995’s Canadian Bacon, and TV series Now And Again, Ed and Sex And City, Stanzler also began producing - helping bring Roger & Me, 90210 and The Client List to fruition. With this firm grounding behind-the-scenes, Wendey Stanzler progressed into directing, with the final season episode of Sex And The City, titled The Ick Factor, in 2004. The episode, notable for depicting the character of Samantha (Kim Cattrall) discovering she has breast cancer, led to what is now a most illustrious career repeatedly calling the shots on high profile television series. Grey’s Anatomy, Monk, Desperate Housewives, Ugly Betty, Gossip Girl, The Vampire Diaries, Nashville, The Mindy Project, Pretty Little Liars, Glee, Sleepy Hollow, Gotham and Arrow have all benefitted from Stanzler's directorial eye. What She Should Direct: The experience she has accumulated has, in recent years, tended toward those shows that are cinematic in quality, and based very much in action as well as strong characterization. As such, Stanzler would be a great choice to helm Cyborg - a planned DC superhero movie - the titular character of which has yet to make an impact on the big screen.

Bethany Rooney

Bethany Rooney Bethany Rooney has an enviable level of experience behind-the-camera, having started out in 1978 as an assistant to producers on the television series The White Shadow, which was created by Bruce Paltrow. From that initial foothold, Rooney moved into a producing role on the multiple Emmy winning show St. Elsewhere – four episodes of which she also directed. Since then, her work has rarely been absent from our screens. Rooney has directed often multiple episodes of highly rated TV shows, across a wide range of genres - including China Beach, The Wonder Years, Beauty And The Beast, Dream On, Sisters, Picket Fences, Dr Quinn Medicine Woman, Ally McBeal, Dawson’s Creek, Boston Public, Joan Of Arcadia, One Tree Hill, Grey’s Anatomy, Weeds, Desperate Housewives, Brothers & Sisters, Arrow, Parenthood, Criminal Minds, and About A Boy. What She Should Direct: The background in directing popular shows that are more family-friendly, in addition to helming character-driven drama with some action thrown in, would make Rooney the perfect choice to direct Chronicles Of Narnia - The Silver Chair.

Gail Mancuso

gail_mancuso The career of Emmy winner Gail Mancuso goes all the way back to the TV show Brothers, for which she served as a Script Supervisor from 1984, for 46 episodes. Performing the same task on an episode of Major Dad, Mancuso then went to work on Roseanne – which saw her move from Associate Director to one of the main directors of the show for the majority of its hugely successful nine season run. In addition to her consistently impressive work on Roseanne, Gail Mancuso also took the helm on episodes of The Nanny, The Naked Truth, Suddenly Susan, The King Of Queens, Ellen, Friends, Dharma & Greg, The Gilmore Girls, Becker, The Tracy Morgan Show, Joey, My Name Is Earl, Scrubs, Community, 30 Rock, Cougar Town, Modern Family, Happyish, Fresh Off The Boat and Cristela. Rounding out her extensive experience, Mancuso has also taken the role of executive producer on many episodes of Ground Floor. What She Should Direct: Her long history of delivering episodes of shows involving humour, stylized characters and tight pacing would make her a great choice to direct a Marvel movie. Thor: Ragnarok would probably be a good fit.

Roxann Dawson

[ctv-2] Although Roxann Dawson is probably best known to television audiences as Lieutenant B’Elanna Torres in the series Star Trek: Voyager, she has also forged a parallel career for herself in the director’s chair. Helming two episodes of that Star Trek spinoff series, and 10 of its stable-mate, Enterprise, Dawson has since gone on to become a skilled director within many genres. Numerous high-profile television shows have benefitted from having Roxann Dawson take the reins, including Charmed, Lost, Crossing Jordan, Cold Case, Heroes, The Closer, The Mentalist, The Good Wife, Scandal, Bates Motel, Bosch, Aquarius and Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. What She Should Direct: Dawson, in particular, has demonstrated the ability to direct long, tension-filled action sequences in a way that is visually arresting and well-paced, while adding to character development. These qualifications would make her a great choice to direct either a James Bond sequel, or one of the planned Star Wars spinoff films.

Tricia Brock

octavia-spencer-tricia-brock-dave-annable Award-winning multi-hyphenate Tricia Brock is a writer, producer and director of television, whose career spans decades. Notably, she wrote two episodes of the hit drama Twin Peaks, along with episodes of Knots Landing and Family Law, and also wrote feature length scripts for Due East and Killer Diller. Brock’s first foray into producing came with 1979’s Mr Mike’s Mondo Video, by Michael O’Donoghue, in addition to Due East in 2002. It is as a director that Brock has excelled, however, racking up over ten years of credits on television shows that have helped to change the landscape of the medium. This list includes episodes of Huff, Grey’s Anatomy, Veronica Mars, Ugly Betty, The L Word, Lipstick Jungle, Breaking Bad, The Big C, Saving Grace, 30 Rock, The Killing, Community, Silicon Valley, Salem, Mozart In The Jungle, Black Box and Girls. What She Should Direct: With the ability to draw together storylines that might otherwise be sprawling, featuring large ensemble casts, coupled with demonstrable experience in directing character-focused stories with specific visual style, humour, and bold action sequences, Tricia Brock is overdue a chance to move into franchise cinema. With a Green Lantern movie looming on Marvel's slate, Brock should be high on the list of directors to be considered for it.

Sanaa Hamri

sanaa-hamri With a background in directing music videos for artists such as Prince and Mariah Carey, Sanaa Hamri has shifted her focus to television, with a smattering of feature films thrown in for good measure. While her feature work includes titles such as The Sisterhood Of The Travelling Pants 2, her directing of episodic television has yielded notable instalments of shows such as Desperate Housewives, Nashville, Hemlock Grove, Glee, Elementary, Shameless, and Empire – for which she also serves as co-executive producer for a number of episodes. What She Should Direct: Hamri would be an inspired choice to direct a Fast And Furious movie. Her work in music videos, coupled with helming large-scale television productions that are necessarily heavily choreographed featuring large ensemble casts, suggests she would deliver an outstanding instalment to the franchise.

Bronwen Hughes

Bronwen Hughes Forces of Nature Bronwen Hughes brings with her a wealth of experience across the editing, music, art, producing and directing departments – including both feature and television projects – gained over thirty years. From editing Confidential in 1986, to being the Art Director on Caribe in 1987, to working as Music Supervisor on Stander in 2003, Hughes has collected a firm grounding in all aspects of the production process – none more so than in directing. A start on Love Hurts eventually led to the visually arresting Forces Of Nature starring Ben Affleck and Sandra Bullock, and Stander, starring Thomas Jane. Hughes quickly made television her main focus, however, and has delivered notable episodes of series such as The L Word, Breaking Bad, Hung, Stalker, Black Box and Allegiance. What She Should Direct: Hughes is an especially distinctive director who has earned the opportunity to direct a distinctive franchise instalment. She handles humorous material well, delivers excellent action sequences and allows character to lead the way. A Bronwen Hughes-directed Shazam! movie would be a fantastic prospect, don't you think?

Holly Dale

[ctv-3] Award-winning Holly Dale is a writer, editor, producer and director, who began her career in the 1970s with a range of unflinching documentaries. From this foundation, Dale has blazed a trail through television, taking in comedy, horror, drama and action along the way. Among her most recent work are episodes of series such as Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles, Heroes, Cold Case, The Bridge, Flashpoint, Grimm, Falling Skies, The Americans, Dexter, Extant, Castle, Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D., NCIS, and Blue Bloods. What She Should Direct: There are some instances where a director and a project are so perfectly matched, that it feels almost bizarre that the union has not yet happened. Holly Dale and a Terminator sequel is one such instance. Apart from the fact that her experience includes helming an episode of The Sarah Connor Chronicles, her work on action-driven, well characterized drama is never stronger than when it involves the creation of an alternative vision of the world - often with elements of science fiction.

Debbie Allen

Debbie Allen Appears On GMA Lydia from Fame is also a writer, musician, artistic consultant, choreographer, producer and director, and has more experience in those roles than most could hope for. Those combined skills have resulted in the award-winning Allen becoming a sought-after director for high-profile television series. After directing 11 episodes of Fame, Allen continued to call the shots, delivering instalments of Family Ties, The Fresh Prince Of Bel Air, A Different World, The Jamie Foxx Show, Everybody Hates Chris, The Client List, Jane The Virgin, How To Get Away With Murder, Scandal, Grey’s Anatomy and Empire. What She Should Direct: With a body of work that is often family-oriented, combining elements of action with strong character, Allen would be another great choice for Chronicles Of Narnia - The Silver Chair.

Lesli Linka Glatter

LesliLinkaGlatter Director and producer Lesli Linka Glatter earned an Oscar nomination in 1985, with her short film, Tales Of Meeting And Parting. Since then, she has earned nominations for Emmys and Directors Guild Awards, among many others - as well as adding some DGA wins to her shelf, too. While she has experience in feature film (State Of Emergency, Now And Then, The Proposition), she has made television her home – building a reputation as one of the most revered producer-directors in the industry. Glatter delivered four episodes of the celebrated series Twin Peaks, before progressing on to NYPD Blue, Murder One, Freaks and Geeks, Gilmore Girls, Grey’s Anatomy, The West Wing, Heroes, ER, House, Mad Men, True Blood, The Walking Dead, The Newsroom, Ray Donovan, Masters Of Sex, Justified, The Leftovers and Homeland. What She Should Direct: With such experience, it seems almost too obvious to point out the fact that Lesli Linka Glatter should be offered the job of directing a James Bond sequel. As a director, she can create and build tension more effectively than many others in the business, and her action sequences are always flawless. She makes the leading of large, ensemble casts in high profile productions seem effortless, and would reinvigorate the franchise more than any other director has in over five decades.

Karen Gaviola

Karen Gaviola Karen Gaviola has been very clear in her career path - going from Assistant Director in TV and film, in titles such as Cagney & Lacey, Caddyshack II, Tales From The Crypt and NYPD Blue, to director of outstanding episodes of television shows that number among the highest rated and most beloved series on TV. As director, Gaviola has delivered notable episodes of NYPD Blue, Cold Case, Bones, Alias, Lost, Law & Order, Without A Trace, Prison Break, Lie To Me, Castle, Blue Bloods, Sons Of Anarchy, Hostages, Gotham, Criminal Minds, The Blacklist, Grimm and Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. What She Should Direct: With her career forged in well-executed action sequences, strong leadership of ensemble casts, and stylized worlds with a touch of humour, Karen Gaviola would be a great choice to direct Black Panther. With the foundation of that movie already having been set in Avengers: Age Of Ultron - introducing the Black Panther villain Ulysses Klaue - Gaviola could easily deliver a successful film that builds on the tone already established.

Gwyneth Horder-Payton

GEORGINA HAIG, ELIZABETH LAIL, ELIZABETH MITCHELL, GWYNETH HORDER-PAYTON (DIRECTOR) As an assistant director, Horder-Payton’s resume is an impressive combination of television and feature film – including Midnight Caller, Pacific Heights, The Doors, Crossing Jordan, Grey’s Anatomy, and The Shield. As a director, however, Horder-Payton has shown herself to be a filmmaker of particular flair and talent. The directorial contributions she has made to the weekly television schedule have included The Riches, Bionic Woman, The Shield, Saving Grace, Fringe, Battlestar Galactica, Torchwood, The Walking Dead, The Killing, Sons Of Anarchy, Once Upon A Time, Longmire, and Justified. What She Should Direct: Her leading of episodes of television that feature strong ensemble casts in dark, stylized tales should place Gwyneth Horder-Payton right at the top of the list of directors considered for Marvel's planned Inhumans movie. She is more than capable of delivering action sequences that do not lose sight of character, and does not shy away from difficult and challenging plot twists. Hiring Horder-Payton to lead one of the most highly anticipated projects on the Marvel slate would be a great choice." ["post_title"]=> string(57) "12 Female TV Directors Who Should Direct A Franchise Film" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(1017) "The conversation about the lack of female directors in Hollywood has been rumbling on for what seems like forever, but that conversation has now found itself at a crucial point. At long last, people are beginning to get specific. After decades of vague allusions to a seemingly intangible, invisible issue, the conversation is finally becoming louder, and less easy to dismiss as the supposedly irrational ramblings of radical feminism. This is thanks to the visible activism of those concerned about the situation – on social media and within the film industry itself. It is also thanks to organisations such as the Female Filmmakers Initiative – launched by the Sundance Institute and Women In Film Los Angeles – which commissioned a vital study into the barriers and opportunities facing independent filmmakers, who try to engage in filmmaking while female. This research was a three year study, and the findings of the third and final phase of it were recently delivered in a powerful and disturbing report." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(48) "female-tv-directors-earned-franchise-opportunity" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-05-06 12:47:57" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-06 17:47:57" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=425559" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(12) ["current_post"]=> int(-1) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(false) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#394 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(428312) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "433" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-05-19 08:49:12" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-19 13:49:12" ["post_content"]=> string(7370) "Often, what you see on a screen when it comes to Hollywood blockbusters is not at all what the initial footage looked like. Whether it's CGI, practical effects, models, costumes, make-up or any of the other numerous tactics employed to create movie magic, the finished product is almost always enhanced in some manner, especially when it comes to these types of films. Thankfully, almost every major blockbuster has its production recorded by photographers and over the years, some truly incredible behind the scenes photos have made their way online. Starting below with Star Wars and continuing over the next few pages with films like The Avengers, Alien, Blade Runner, Jaws and Jurassic Park, we've compiled several behind the scenes galleries that we think you'll enjoy.

Star Wars Franchise

As iconic as they come, the Star Wars franchise is truly in a class of its own in Hollywood. Spanning six films, with many more on the way, the history behind George Lucas' iconic story set in a galaxy far, far away is extremely interesting and the legacy that this franchise has left on pop culture is insurmountable. While the below gallery is by no means a complete collection of them all, we've included some of favorites, and we're confident that you'll enjoy them. [gallery link="file" ids="428350,428349,428344,428345,428346,428347,428348,428342,428368,428903,428904,428905,428907,429679,429681,429682,429684,430342,430343,430344,430345,430346"]

Jurassic Park

Jurassic Park, for many, is a film that captured the heart and imagination like no other. Steven Spielberg's groundbreaking romp through the titular theme park both delighted and terrified audiences back in the summer of 1993 and went on to become one of the highest grossing films of all-time, and deservedly so. It presented an awe-inspiring and thrilling adventure unlike anything that we had ever seen before, and its cultural significance cannot be ignored. Of course, the big draw here is the dinos themselves, and in the below gallery, you can take a better look at just what went into creating these larger than life creatures and how exactly Spielberg brought his breathtaking vision to the big screen. [gallery link="file" ids="428318,428319,428320,428321,428322,428323,428324,428325,428326,428327,428328,428329,428330,428331,428332,428333,428334,428335,428336,428337,428338,428339,428340,429687,429688,429689,429690,429691,429692,429693,429694"]

Blade Runner

Ridley Scott's classic sci-fi, Blade Runner, was actually a bit of a dud upon release. However, in the time since, it's gone onto become one of the most important films ever made and is often regarded as one of the genre's most impressive achievements. One of the things that really helped Blade Runner succeed was the incredible world that Scott created on screen. With fantastic production values throughout and impressive visuals assaulting us constantly, the director brought his vision of a futuristic Los Angeles to life in stunning fashion, allowing us to become fully immersed in the story that was being told. In the gallery below, you'll see some of the models that aided Scott in creating such a fascinating world, as well as some behind the scenes shots of the cast acting out a few of the film's more iconic scenes. It only scratches the surface of what went into bringing this world to life, but still it's an interesting look at the timeless movie. [gallery link="file" ids="428854,428855,428857,428858,428859,428860,428861,428862,428863,428864,428866,428867,428869,428870,428871,428872,428873,428874,428875,428876,428877,428878,429700,429701,429702,429703,429704"]

Alien

Like Blade Runner, Alien is another movie that cemented director Ridley Scott's status as a legendary filmmaker and ensured him a place amongst the greats. It's the perfect blend of sci-fi and horror and featured one of the most iconic female protagonists in the history of cinema: Sigourney Weaver's Ellen Ripley. The definitive behind the scenes look at this film, and its sequels, definitely comes in the form of the Blu-Ray box set, but that doesn't mean we can't get any insight into the production with a couple of entertaining behind the scenes images, right? On that note, here's a gallery of some great shots that we've found around the web, featuring Scott, Weaver and numerous other cast and crew members. Enjoy! [gallery link="file" ids="428879,428880,428881,428882,428883,428885,428886,428887,428888,428889,428890,428891,428892,428893,428894,428895,428896,428897,428898,428899,428900,428901,430327,430328,430329,430330,430331,430332,430333,430334,430335,430336,430337,430338,430339,430340,430341"]

Jaws

Before he made Jurassic Park, Steve Spielberg brought another terrifying creature to the big screen with Jaws. The film that many people credit with making them too scared to go back in the water, Jaws took Hollywood, and the moviegoing public by storm back when it hit theatres in 1975. Crucial in creating and then establishing Hollywood's current business model when it comes to blockbusters, there's a lot to admire about this movie and it still, to this day, stands as one of the most thrilling open water adventures ever committed to celluloid. [gallery link="file" ids="428839,428840,428842,428843,428844,428846,428847,428848,428849,428850,428851,429712,429713,429714,429715,429716,429717,429718,429719,429720,429721,429722"]

The Avengers

In 2012, Marvel did the impossible. With the help of Joss Whedon, and a game cast (Robert Downey Jr., Mark Ruffalo, Chris Evans, Samuel L. Jackson etc.), the studio successfully pulled off a superhero team-up film that many thought would be near impossible. And not only did they pull it off, but they absolutely knocked it out of the park, providing us with one of the most exciting entries into the genre in some time. Of course, producing a gigantic film of such epic proportions is no easy feat, and in the gallery below, you'll get a look at Whedon and his crew trying to put The Avengers together. From green screen battles to the director coaching his cast, the behind the scenes images we have for you here will definitely excite anyone who counts themselves as a Marvel fan. [gallery link="file" ids="428908,428909,428910,428911,428912,428913,428914,428915,428916,428917,428918,428919,428920,428921,428922,428923,428924,428925,428926,428927,429695,429697,429698,429699"]" ["post_title"]=> string(88) "Incredible Behind The Scenes Photos From Star Wars, Jurassic Park, The Avengers And More" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(368) "Often, what you see on a screen when it comes to Hollywood blockbusters is not at all what the initial footage looked like. Whether it's CGI, practical effects, models, costumes, make-up or any of the other numerous tactics employed to create movie magic, the finished product is almost always enhanced in some manner, especially when it comes to these types of films." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(63) "behind-scenes-photos-star-wars-alien-blade-runner-avengers-jaws" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-05-21 13:56:24" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-05-21 18:56:24" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=428312" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["comment_count"]=> int(0) ["current_comment"]=> int(-1) ["found_posts"]=> string(3) "943" ["max_num_pages"]=> float(79) ["max_num_comment_pages"]=> int(0) ["is_single"]=> bool(false) ["is_preview"]=> bool(false) ["is_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_archive"]=> bool(true) ["is_date"]=> bool(false) ["is_year"]=> bool(false) ["is_month"]=> bool(false) ["is_day"]=> bool(false) ["is_time"]=> bool(false) ["is_author"]=> bool(false) ["is_category"]=> bool(false) ["is_tag"]=> bool(true) ["is_tax"]=> bool(false) ["is_search"]=> bool(false) ["is_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_comment_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_trackback"]=> bool(false) ["is_home"]=> bool(false) ["is_404"]=> bool(false) ["is_comments_popup"]=> bool(false) ["is_paged"]=> bool(false) ["is_admin"]=> bool(false) ["is_attachment"]=> bool(false) ["is_singular"]=> bool(false) ["is_robots"]=> bool(false) ["is_posts_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_post_type_archive"]=> bool(false) ["query_vars_hash":"WP_Query":private]=> string(32) "91f23aca3b104b5e9062cc4cee2631f1" ["query_vars_changed":"WP_Query":private]=> bool(false) ["thumbnails_cached"]=> bool(false) ["stopwords":"WP_Query":private]=> NULL } -->