Tag: Interstellar

  • Matthew McConaughey
  • Anne Hathaway
  • Jessica Chastain
  • Casey Affleck

Description: He took us inside the human mind in Inception, and now Christopher Nolan is widening his scope in a huge way to take audiences further into the corners of space than ever before. In Interstellar, Earth's resources have been depleted, and the planet is growing progressively inhospitable to human life. In a last-ditch effort to sustain the human race, a group of explorers are sent through a newly discovered wormhole in hopes of conquering interstellar travel and finding a new home for humanity. What they discover will decide the future of all humankind. Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, Jessica Chastain, Wes Bentley, Topher Grace, Michael Caine, Casey Affleck, John Lithgow, Ellen Burstyn, David Oyelowo, Mackenzie Foy and William Devane all star.

Director(s): Christopher Nolan

Writer(s): Jonathan Nolan Christopher Nolan

Release Date: November 7th, 2014

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Interstellar-5 With a story about a ravaged planet having to look for new habitation elsewhere, the obvious cause to move away today would be to avoid the disastrous effects of climate change. How did the Dust Bowl-inspired “Blight” end up as the launching pad instead? Jonathan Nolan: In thinking about the future – and I spent a lot of time thinking about the future in writing this film – you think a lot about the past and the past’s perception of what the future is going to be like. I wanted a jet pack, but we got Instagram. [Laughs] Kind of a raw deal, but the future is never quite what you imagine it’s going to be. Right now, we’re all focused in on climate change. I think that’s absolutely appropriate and we should be doing everything we can. There were concerns about the Ozone layer and there were concerns when I was a kid about the population bomb. We’ve always found a different way of focusing on it. All of those problems are connected to each other, right. We do tend to refocus on the question every few decades. I think the feeling we were really trying to get at was to recognize that there are simply so many things that could extinguish life on Earth and it’s probably not going to be the thing we thought it was. The problem with living on one planet in one solar system… inevitably, we’re going to perish, if we don’t spread beyond this planet. I spent a memorable afternoon with Kip [Thorne] and a bunch of biologists and astrobiologists talking about all the many different ways that human life can be extinguished at CalTech one day. It was truly sobering. We’d vanish without a trace if we’re not careful, and it might be a slight increase in solar radiation, it could be an asteroid, it could be the bacteria here on earth. Or, in the case in this film as we presented it, we wanted something that was familiar but not necessarily expected: the Blight. Look at the potato famine and the events of those handful of years in Ireland in the 19th century, and then all the blights that are kind of invisible to us right now. The bananas that we eat right now are different than the bananas that we ate growing up as kids and different again from the ones that our parents ate as kids. Because of the way that we factory farm, it encourages the growth of blights that quickly become more efficient at eating our food than we are. The idea of a total blight is a reach but not unimaginable. The environmental impact that that would have, the Dust Bowl – which is something that Chris added, building off the logic of a blight – those effects are catastrophic and they’re within living memory. The Dust Bowl is one of these events that is beautifully immortalized in Ken Burns’ documentary [from 2012] from which some of those clips [seen at the beginning of Interstellar] are taken from. It was one of Chris’s flourishes, a brilliant one, and Ken was kind enough to work with the film on that level. The Dust Bowl has been forgotten by so many. It’s so hard for us to conceive of how destructive and apocalyptic that was. Chris actually had to [tone it] down a little bit. The imagery, the things described by survivors of the Dust Bowl seemed too outlandish and too massive for an audience to even believe. But these were real events… to Americans in the previous century, in living memory. It felt like a great foundation for us to think about the ways in which human life can be extinguished that might come out of nowhere. Interstellar deals with a fantastic voyage and now there is the Mars One concept for the next decade to take a group of human beings and let them establish a colony on Mars. Many in the scientific community are saying it’s technically unfeasible and an enormous risk to those who end up going. What are your thoughts about this ambitious venture? Jonathan Nolan: I’m not familiar with the details of [Mars One] but I’m much more familiar with Elon Musk’s stated goals of getting to Mars and the technical capacity for getting there. I think regardless of the group who’s backing it, I think it’s extremely important. Part of the reason I got this job is I came in and talked to Spielberg about this project he was developing about a current-day, interstellar space exploration. And I said to him, “Here’s the realistic version. It’s 10 minutes long, it doesn’t happen, because the money’s all tied up in budget appropriation and bullshit and we’re not going.” That was a more cynical moment and that was almost 10 years ago. 10 years ago, at that moment, it felt like it was not going to happen. It felt like speech making. Now it feels like there’s a viable model, a partnership potentially between private and public moneys – NASA in partnership with other people – to establish a beachhead elsewhere in the solar system. At the end of several years of working on this project, it feels extremely important to me that we continue a robust program of space exploration and colonization. As goofy as it sounds – and it sounds like a science-fiction movie, right – it sounded goofy that we would ever put people on the moon. It would be sad to think that the only reason we were able to accomplish that was because we were in direct competition with the Soviet Union. We’re not in a Cold War anymore. Can we do this of our own initiative? Can we do this not because it’s a pissing contest with the Russians, but because the global community decides that this is scientifically valuable, and frankly, also potentially a matter of survival? That concludes our interview, but we would like to thank Jonathan Nolan very much for speaking with us. Be sure to pick up Interstellar as it's now available on Blu-Ray." ["post_title"]=> string(55) "Exclusive Interview With Jonathan Nolan On Interstellar" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(456) "Jonathan Nolan is one of the most in-demand screenwriters in Hollywood today. His first four screenplays, which he co-wrote with brother Christopher Nolan, are among the top #100 most-loved films according to the Internet Movie Database. (The Prestige, The Dark Knight, The Dark Knight Rises and, now, Interstellar.) You could even count a fifth title in that grouping if you include his story credit for Memento, for which he received an Oscar nomination." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(47) "exclusive-interview-jonathan-nolan-interstellar" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-04-01 15:45:12" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-04-01 20:45:12" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=419482" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#293 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(417747) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "370" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-03-28 14:26:42" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-03-28 19:26:42" ["post_content"]=> string(9837) "Interstellar Interstellar confirms beyond all doubt that there is no blockbuster filmmaker working today who is more ambitious than Christopher Nolan. An almost three-hour space epic that combines the theoretical physics of Kip Thorne, cutting-edge visual effects, a dynamite cast led by Matthew McConaughey and a deeply personal, emotional core concerned with the transcendent power of love, Interstellar is a striking anomaly. It's certainly the most far-reaching work by a mainstream director since the Wachowskis' Cloud Atlas and may well bear comparisons to Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey (one of the many films Nolan openly cited as an influence). Its story is a jaw-droppingly enthusiastic one, spanning generations and pushing into the further reaches of the universe even as it attempts to tell the much more intimate tale of how one father's love for his daughter can cut across all of time and space. Interstellar is also, perhaps unavoidably given its goals, a bit of a mess, a movie that takes almost an hour to get moving and that takes wormhole-sized shortcuts in order to keep both astronaut Cooper (Matthew McConaughey, both wonderfully understated and commanding) and his brilliant daughter Murphy (Mackenzie Foy, all heartbreaking terror, then Jessica Chastain, less convincing) central to a story that threatens to engulf them at every moment. To try to describe the sprawl of Interstellar could fill the next few paragraphs, but suffice to say that no one other than Nolan (working from a complex, convoluted and sometimes clunky script from his brother, Jonathan) would be crazy enough to make a movie so undeniably big. This is a film that wants to sketch one human's indefatigable drive to survive against an immeasurable canvas, that undertakes a rollicking adventure through black holes to alien landscapes while still anchoring its story with a very small-scale bond between two people the cruelty of necessity has kept light-years apart. Nolan seems to mimic both Kubrick, who dared us all to dream a little bigger in our vision of the universe's vast expanses, and Steven Spielberg, for whom no amount of thought-provoking odyssey could outweigh the ascendency of the human heart. And in his laboring to do right by both masters, Nolan winds up split down the middle. There's a good scene in which Murphy, having grown up after Cooper's depature and working to solve the equation of gravity that would let space stations be launched from Earth, realizes that her mentor, Professor Brand (Michael Caine), has never considered a key possibility about one of the equation's components - that time may not be outside the realm of manipulation. "Are you ridiculing my life's work?" He asks. "No," comes her reply. "I'm saying that you've been trying to finish it with one arm, no, with both arms tied behind your back. And I don't understand why." Interstellar feels a lot like that, its director and scribe both shackled to the Hallmark-worthy sentiment that, in the end, all you need is love. Seriously - Hans Zimmer scores the film with ear-splitting force, seemingly seated before the universe's largest pipe organ, but the Beatles may have been a more thematically appropriate choice. For science-fiction lovers, then, Interstellar may fall a little short of expectation. For as much physical ground as its explorers traverse, the cosmic speculation is more often than not muted in favor of humbler emotional resonance. That's a real shame, because so much about Interstellar works that the film feels damnably close to putting its myriad pieces together. Visually, it's more accomplished than any other film that came out in 2014, furnishing countless, framable images of heart-stopping grandeur. Narratively, it reaches for the stars, and that ambition is almost commendable enough to overlook the hokey contrivances and dull conversations that constitute most of the bridge-too-far final act. Almost. And emotionally, as disappointingly grounded as this space epic is, one can begrudge that its heart is in the right place. It's in the mingling of all these ingredients that both Nolans fail. Length be damned, Interstellar's goals are so lofty that, was the film as compelling as it should have been, viewers would have gladly sat through another hour without complaint. Instead, it peddles out the same Dylan Thomas poem (you know the one) again and again in place of any meaningful philosophy, succumbs to the hoo-hah idea of one plucky explorer moving heaven and earth through sheer willpower, and ties everything up in an insultingly tidy manner for a film that's meant to explore the universe's infinite, unknowable complexities. With Interstellar, Nolan boldly went where few directors have dared to go before - but there's no escaping how unfortunate it is that he did so with both arms tied behind his back. interstellar-movie-mission-patch On Blu-Ray, Interstellar is a stunning experience. The 1080p transfer smooths over transitions between widescreen and IMAX scenes, and its grasp on crystal-clear image is superb. There are shots in Interstellar, both the sweeping ones of deep space and smaller ones of Midwest corn fields, and that's a tribute to the excellence of Nolan's direction and Hoyte van Hoytema's visionary cinematography. Black levels are appropriately inky and absorbing in the space-set scenes, and flesh tones are generally accurate and convincing, if occasionally a little oversaturated. The level of detail, though, is incredible, from minute crinkles on Cooper's space suit to highly textured landscapes on foreign planets. It's hard to fault a transfer that dazzles as frequently as Interstellar's. It strikes this reviewer as somewhat odd that a 7.1 track wasn't enlisted for this often deafening movie, but the DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 lossless soundtrack provided on the Blu-Ray is stellar as well, pulling the viewer into a maelstrom of sound, from the crisp dialogue to the heart-stopping heights of Hans Zimmer's ginormous score to the quieter buzzing of the spacecraft. The music is intentionally overwhelming, sometimes drowning out dialogue, so people who took issue with that when Interstellar was in theaters won't find much respite on the Blu-Ray, but that quibble aside, Interstellar juggles a staggering amount of sound with skill and elegance. The Interstellar Blu-Ray offers a host of extras. There's a DVD copy, a UV/iTunes/Google Play digital copy and a collectible IMAX film cell included in the release, but in terms of actual special features, we've got: Paramount didn't skimp on the bonus features here. The must-watch is definitely "The Science of Interstellar," narrated by Matthew McConaughey, which looks at how the film attempted to include a huge amount of real scientific research in its plot, from wormholes and black holes to which planets could theoretically support life if Earth became uninhabitable. It's a mini-doc of sorts, slickly assembled and constantly engaging. Otherwise, "Inside Interstellar" tackles just about every topic related to the film imaginable, from conception to filming to the development of various characters, including the non-human ones. This was a titanic undertaking for all involved, and the featurettes make sure to communciate that. All in all, Interstellar is a frustratingly flawed film that reaches for the stars and doesn't quite get there. Watching it try, though, is often mesmerizing, and on an audiovisual level, Interstellar is the most flooring cinematic experience of 2014. It's so disappointing that the plot gets its focus confused and winds up lost in space. This was a film that could have said something meaningful about space travel, our place in the universe and the future of interstellar exploration. Instead, it settles for cheesy, Hallmark-esque melodrama that essentially bubbles all of human endeavor down to one human's love for his daughter. That love is the strongest force in the universe may be a sweet notion, it's not the one that science-fiction lovers had hoped Nolan would pursue in a film of this scale and scope. For a space epic, Interstellar is far too often earthbound. [ctv-1]" ["post_title"]=> string(27) "Interstellar Blu-Ray Review" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(408) "Interstellar confirms beyond all doubt that there is no blockbuster filmmaker working today more ambitious than Christopher Nolan. An almost three-hour space epic that combines the theoretical physics of Kip Thorne, cutting-edge visual effects, a dynamite cast led by Matthew McConaughey and a deeply personal, emotional core concerned with the transcendent power of love, Interstellar is a striking anomaly." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(26) "interstellar-bluray-review" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-04-24 12:17:37" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-04-24 17:17:37" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=417747" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#371 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(417745) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "370" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-03-21 12:42:47" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-03-21 17:42:47" ["post_content"]=> string(3734) "Interstellar Contrary to popular belief, Christopher Nolan was not the first Nolan involved with Interstellar. Before the Dark Knight helmer came aboard, Steven Spielberg was mulling taking the reins and would have worked from a script by Jonathan Nolan. Of course, that didn't happen, and viewers ended up with a visually jaw-dropping and narratively ambitious (if not entirely successful) space epic that explored universal themes of time, love and the human drive to survive. The Christopher Nolan touch made the pic soar in some ways and fall short in others, but now it has come out that if Jonathan Nolan had his way, Interstellar would have been a very, very different film altogether. Promoting the movie's upcoming Blu-Ray release, the younger Nolan recently let slip that his original ending for Interstellar would have divided public opinion even more than the final one. SPOILER ALERT! Interstellar ends with a bit of a head-trip - Matthew McConaughey's intrepid astronaut Cooper hurtles himself into black hole Gargantua, only to find himself in a fifth dimension called The Tesseract, where time is a spatial dimension that he can manipulate to communicate with his daughter Murphy (Mackenzie Foy, then Jessica Chastain) back on Earth. Using gravitational waves, he's able to look into his daughter's bedroom throughout time to communicate data gathered by robot companion TARS and save the human race. As Nolan recently revealed, though, his original ending was both simpler and far more depressing. Before rewrites, Interstellar “had the Einstien-Rosen bridge [colloquially, a wormhole] collapse when Cooper tries to send the data back,” the screenwriter said. He didn't elaborate on the point, but it's not hard to conclude that collapse would have essentially doomed Cooper. Floating without a spacecraft with no way to reach fellow explorer Amelia (Anne Hathaway), be reunited with Murphy or, perhaps most dismayingly, know whether his data made it through Gargantua or not. He would have spent his final moments completely unaware of whether Earth's population would starve and suffocate, up until his own oxygen ran out and killed him. This original ending would have been a much more classic version of the hero's sacrifice, wherein Cooper (potentially) completed his mission only to die in the process. It also would have made a lot more sense then all the time-manipulating gobbledygook that ended up in the final cut. Additionally, the gravitational anomalies that led Cooper and the younger Murphy to NASA's secret base were originally supposed to be "gravity waves" emanating from the destruction of a neutron star on the other side of Gargantua, which would have been detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravity-Wave Observatory (LIGO), an invention of the film's science consultant/producer Kip Thorne.
“That was very near and dear to me, but Chris thought it was too much science for the public to digest at once,” Thorne said.
For those of you who have seen Interstellar, what do you make of that new information? Would you have preferred Nolan's bleaker original ending to the one that they eventually went with? And would more science have weakened the film or strengthened it? Let us know below." ["post_title"]=> string(60) "Interstellar's Original Ending Was Really, Really Depressing" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(679) "Contrary to popular belief, Christopher Nolan was not the first Nolan involved with Interstellar. Before the Dark Knight helmer came aboard, Steven Spielberg was mulling taking the reins and would have worked from a script by Jonathan Nolan. Of course, that didn't happen, and viewers ended up with a visually jaw-dropping and narratively ambitious (if not entirely successful) space epic that explored universal themes of time, love and the human drive to survive. The Christopher Nolan touch made the pic soar in some ways and fall short in others, but now it has come out that if Jonathan Nolan had his way, Interstellar would have been a very, very different film altogether." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(33) "interstellars-original-depressing" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-03-21 13:14:18" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-03-21 18:14:18" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=417745" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#369 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(410422) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "387" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-02-17 17:05:06" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-02-17 22:05:06" ["post_content"]=> string(85) "[gallery ids="410433,410435,410434,410428,410429,410427,410425,410782,410783,410784"]" ["post_title"]=> string(55) "Gallery Feature: 10 Close Races To Watch On Oscar Night" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(129) "As we approach Oscar Night on Sunday, February 22, 2015, We Got This Covered examines some of the Academy Awards' tightest races." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(48) "gallery-feature-10-close-races-watch-oscar-night" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-02-17 18:11:25" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-02-17 23:11:25" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=410422" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#370 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(410445) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "340" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-02-16 13:00:33" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-02-16 18:00:33" ["post_content"]=> string(2600) "Interstellar Even before it was sent forth on its maiden voyage toward the IMAX screen late last year, moviegoers the world over anticipated that Christopher Nolan's cerebral sci-fi would take full advantage of the big-screen platform. Low and behold, despite its narrative flaws, Interstellar was brimming with such visual majesty and wonderfully orchestrated shots that it became almost a necessity to see it on the largest screen possible. And thankfully, Warner Bros. is offering those who perhaps slept on the opportunity to see the film in IMAX another chance. That's right, on Saturday, February 21st for one-day-only, the studio is re-releasing Interstellar alongside twelve minutes of behind-the-scenes footage to boot. Here's a brief rundown of what to expect when Nolan's opus hits the screen once more.
The one-day-only “An Encore of Interstellar: The IMAX Experience” showings will take place at 3:00 p.m. local times at participating AMC Theatres and will feature more than 12 minutes of never-before-seen exclusive behind-the-scenes content. Moviegoers who purchase a ticket at a participating AMC Theatres box office to see “An Encore of Interstellar: The IMAX Experience” can receive an additional ticket free. This special offer is only available at participating AMC Theatres box offices; online purchases are not eligible.
Nominated for five Oscar awards across a variety of technical categories including Best Original Design and Best Sound Mixing, Interstellar certainly inspired the voting members of the Academy, even if the film's ambitious, physics-bending storytelling didn't receive similar attention. In case you weren't already aware, Nolan's latest genre piece takes place in the not-do-distant future where humanity is forced to live on a planet earth ravaged by dust storms and food shortages. With our pale blue dot decaying by the day, the remnants of NASA piece together a final mission in a bid to find a new hospitable planet to call our own. With TARS and CASE working on the logistics, Interstellar is expected to dock on Blu-Ray in time for March 31." ["post_title"]=> string(101) "Interstellar Gets The Encore Treatment As Christopher Nolan's Sci-Fi Returns To IMAX For One Day Only" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(553) "Even before it was sent forth on its maiden voyage toward the IMAX screen late last year, moviegoers the world over anticipated that Christopher Nolan's cerebral sci-fi would take full advantage of the big-screen platform. Low and behold, despite its narrative flaws, Interstellar was brimming with such visual majesty and wonderfully orchestrated shots that it became almost a necessity to see it on the largest screen possible. And thankfully, Warner Bros. is offering those who perhaps slept on the opportunity to see the film in IMAX another chance." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(100) "interstellar-gets-the-encore-treatment-as-christopher-nolans-sci-fi-returns-to-imax-for-one-day-only" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(120) " http://wegotthiscovered.com/blu-ray/christopher-nolans-interstellar-preps-landing-gear-for-blu-ray-release-on-march-31/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-02-16 14:19:15" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-02-16 19:19:15" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=410445" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [5]=> object(WP_Post)#368 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(403967) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-02-04 00:33:04" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-02-04 05:33:04" ["post_content"]=> string(121) "[gallery link="file" ids="404001,404005,403999,404006,404003,404004,404018,404017,404000,407883,407882,407888"]  " ["post_title"]=> string(59) "Gallery: 12 Movie Plot Holes That Have Never Been Explained" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(81) "WGTC takes a look at 12 puzzling movie plot holes that have never been explained." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(36) "gallery-9-movie-plot-holes-explained" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-02-04 22:42:19" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-02-05 03:42:19" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=403967" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [6]=> object(WP_Post)#329 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(405723) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "340" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-01-26 12:02:48" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-01-26 17:02:48" ["post_content"]=> string(3665) "Interstellar Warner Bros. has confirmed that Interstellar will enter near-Earth orbit on March 31, when Christopher Nolan's cerebral sci-fi will become available on Blu-Ray. Charting the bold and ambitious endeavours of Matthew McConaughey and Co., Nolan's latest takes place in the not-so-distant and terrifyingly believable future where humanity is clutching at straws to resolve the planet's crippling food crisis. With unforgiving dust storms forcing the remnants of society back to their agrarian roots, a small band of survivors pull together to go boldly where no man has gone before, entering a wormhole in the hope of finding a new habitable planet to call their own. Joining McConaughey for the mind-bending journey are Anne Hathaway, Wes Bentley and two wise-cracking AI robots known as TARS and CASE. When it released last year, many moviegoers were chomping at the bit to see Interstellar in all of its grandeur, hunting down the biggest screen and widest format they could possibly find. Unfortunately, that time has passed, but much like the majority of films in Nolan's backlog, his bold sci-fi odyssey pretty much demands a repeat viewing, and we can't wait to have our knowledge of phyiscs pushed to breaking point -- and beyond! -- when the movie docks on Blu-Ray on March 31. Here's a comprehensive list of all of the supplementary bonuses you can look forward to in a couple months time.
" ["post_title"]=> string(83) "Christopher Nolan's Interstellar Preps Landing Gear For Blu-Ray Release On March 31" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(156) "Warner Bros. has confirmed that Interstellar will enter near-Earth orbit on March 31, when Christopher Nolan's cerebral sci-fi becomes available on Blu-ray." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(82) "christopher-nolans-interstellar-preps-landing-gear-for-blu-ray-release-on-march-31" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-01-26 12:17:25" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-01-26 17:17:25" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=405723" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [7]=> object(WP_Post)#367 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(403535) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "387" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-01-15 13:23:07" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-01-15 18:23:07" ["post_content"]=> string(104) "[gallery link="file" ids="403539,403540,403541,403542,403543,403544,403557,403547,403548,403549,403558"]" ["post_title"]=> string(46) "Gallery: The Biggest Oscar Snubs And Surprises" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(106) "We Got This Covered looks at several major snubs and surprises from this year's Academy Award nominations." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(37) "gallery-biggest-oscar-snubs-surprises" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-01-15 15:42:55" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-01-15 20:42:55" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=403535" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [8]=> object(WP_Post)#363 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(397076) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "242" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-01-06 11:31:46" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-01-06 16:31:46" ["post_content"]=> string(95) "[gallery ids="401004,401021,397077,397078,401195,401192,397080,401193,401190,397082"]  " ["post_title"]=> string(44) "Gallery: 10 Stunning Movie Posters From 2014" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(68) "A countdown of the 10 best movie posters that were released in 2015." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(25) "top-10-movie-posters-2014" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-01-06 11:33:59" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-01-06 16:33:59" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=397076" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [9]=> object(WP_Post)#366 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(401126) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "340" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2014-12-31 11:36:44" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2014-12-31 16:36:44" ["post_content"]=> string(2218) " Christopher Nolan's Interstellar may have proved somewhat divisive among audiences when it arrived early last month, but the general consensus was that the director's cerebral sci-fi still served up some of the most awe-inspiring scenes of the year. It's a feat that can largely be attributed to cinematographer Hoyte Van Hoytema's astute eye and Nolan's penchant for practical effects. And in a new featurette released via Yahoo Movies, the esteemed director dissects one of the film's best sequences: the arrival of the crew on Miller's planet. Those of you who have seen Interstellar will know that this is the first planet that the Endurance crew visit in their search for a hospitable world, though things soon turn awry when McConaughey and co. realize that the entire surface is blanketed in shallow water roiled by towering, mountain-sized waves. In the clip above, Nolan reveals how he effectively created the alien world. By filming in Iceland, the director and his crew were able to transport the spaceship itself to the country and capture it landing in the shallow water without the need for CGI wizardry. Moreover, the director touches upon how the team built the sets more like simulator rides, enabling the actors to recreate the motions of breaking through a planet's atmosphere and landing relatively safely as accurately as possible. It's a fascinating look behind the scenes of what is, arguably, Nolan's most audacious and high concept film to date. Whether you loved or loathed it, there's no doubting that Interstellar pushed the envelope in terms of visual and indeed practical effects -- there aren't many studios that would greenlight the building of a full-size spacecraft, after all -- and it's nice to learn more about the director's modus operandi. Now all we need is a similar anatomy of the scene for the film's docking sequence.  " ["post_title"]=> string(93) "Christopher Nolan Dissects Interstellar Landing Scene And Practical Effects In New Featurette" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(386) "Christopher Nolan's Interstellar may have proved somewhat divisive among audiences when it arrived early last month, but the general consensus was that the director's cerebral sci-fi still served up some of the most awe-inspiring scenes of the year. It's a feat that can largely be attributed to cinematographer Hoyte Van Hoytema's astute eye and Nolan's penchant for practical effects." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(82) "christopher-nolan-dissects-interstellar-landing-scene-practical-effects-featurette" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2014-12-31 13:36:59" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2014-12-31 18:36:59" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=401126" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [10]=> object(WP_Post)#365 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(400175) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "386" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2014-12-24 16:55:01" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2014-12-24 21:55:01" ["post_content"]=> string(1769) "birdman-edward-norton-michael-keaton-600x400 In their final show of the year, the gang put their exhausted, film-addled heads together one last time before 2015 comes a knockin'. This week, Liam is joined (via the magic of Skype) by Dom and regular contributors Dr. Lindsay Hallam and David James, as well as the triumphantly returning Matthew Lee. Tasked with summing up one hell of a year of cinema, the gang run down their personal lists of best and (of course) worst movies of the year - as well as discussing the movies everyone should be excited about in the coming months. From Werner Herzog to Michael Fassbender's penis, no end of year filmcast is anywhere near as all-encompassing, The Tea & Crumpet crew would like to thank everyone involved in the show - be they contributor or, of course, listener - in what's proven to be a lively and fantastically fun inaugural year. Here's to an even better 2015! Download as MP3 (Right Click-Save As) RSS Feed Subscribe to the Filmcast on iTunes! " ["post_title"]=> string(60) "The Tea & Crumpet Filmcast: End Of Year Special (Episode 12)" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(303) "In their final show of the year, the gang put their exhausted, film-addled heads together one last time before 2015 comes a knockin'. This week, Liam is joined (via the magic of Skype) by Dom and regular contributors Dr. Lindsay Hallam and David James, as well as the triumphantly returning Matthew Lee." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(44) "tea-crumpet-filmcast-year-special-episode-12" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2014-12-24 18:19:53" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2014-12-24 23:19:53" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=400175" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [11]=> object(WP_Post)#364 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(398376) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "387" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2014-12-14 16:29:00" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2014-12-14 21:29:00" ["post_content"]=> string(7485) "exodus-gods-and-kings1 It was another quiet pre-Christmas weekend at the North American box office, as audiences wait to return to Middle Earth this Wednesday. Leading the charge was Exodus: Gods and Kings, the pricey 3D swords-and-sandals adventure from director Ridley Scott. It earned an estimated $24.5 million over its first three days. The film was the second major title this year to tackle a popular Old Testament story, although it debuted far below Noah's $43.7 million opening in late March. Normally, a film with that opening and a $140 million budget would be labeled a box office disappointment. However, with Christmas holidays coming up, it is likely that the movie displays much better legs than Noah did back in the spring. (That film crawled to the $100 million mark due to mixed word-of-mouth.) However, Exodus: Gods and Kings has received similarly lukewarm responses from audiences, who gave it a B- CinemaScore. Among CGI-infested epics that came out in early December - ones not based on a novel by J.R.R. Tolkien, that is - it debuted in a similar league as 2007's The Golden Compass's $25.8 million and 2010's The Chronicles of Narnia: Voyage of the Dawn Treader ($24 million). The latter film finished with more than four times its opening; however, the 2010 Christmas season lacked a lot of blockbuster hits. This year has some bigger competition to face, though. With high-octane excitement from The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies, it is likely that Exodus: Gods and Kings struggles to hit the century mark. Speaking of Peter Jackson's film, that film saw a strong opening overseas, digging up $117.6 million worth of treasure from 37 markets. In all of those countries, this final chapter opened higher than the first two installments, aided by the help of IMAX grosses. Falling to second place after three weekends on top was The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1, which dipped 40% to grab another $13.2 million. That is only around $500,000 less than Catching Fire made in its fourth weekend, although that film had to compete with The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug. Even though Mockingjay, at $277.4 million, is still running $80 million behind its predecessor, with its smaller-than-expected drops over the past three weekends, it is now performing similarly to Catching Fire. If it holds up at that film's pace over the holidays, it should end up as 2014's highest-grossing film in North America, defeating Guardians of the Galaxy. Continuing its lackluster box office run was DreamWorks' Penguins of Madagascar, which dropped 33% to earn $7.1 million. The film only has $58.8 million after 19 days. With two family-oriented movies coming out next Friday, it is unlikely that the Penguins have much more in their engine. The film should end its run with around $90 million, which is half of the total gross of the lowest-grossing Madagascar film, Escape 2 Africa. It will be another pricey disappointment for the folks at DreamWorks Animation. topfive With a solid debut in fourth place was Chris Rock's critically-acclaimed comedy Top Five, grossing $7.2 million. The film opened in just under 1,000 theaters and Paramount is set to widen Rock's film over the holiday season. However, with the buzzy R-rated comedy The Interview opening, as well as no Golden Globe nominations to boost its appeal, Top Five will have to run on its good word-of-mouth. This could be the film's only weekend in the box office top five. Still, a leggy run like the star-driven comedy St. Vincent's from earlier this fall would not be a surprise. If Paramount's R-rated niche comedy Young Adult could finish with around five times its opening against harsher competition in 2009, a total of $40 million seems like a good target for Rock. Meanwhile, Golden Globe nominee and boffo box office performer Big Hero 6 slid only 24% this weekend, taking in another $6.1 million. With $185.5 million in its coffers so far, the film is days away from surpassing the total of Wreck-it Ralph. Despite the family competition over the holidays, it should easily cross the $200 million mark. Although the multiplexes were quiet this weekend, specialty and art-house theaters were packed, as audiences wanted to catch up on intriguing new titles and Golden Globe nominees. The Reese Witherspoon-led drama Wild cracked the top 10 from only 116 theaters, grossing $1.6 million, and the film is slated to hit more than 800 theaters next weekend. Witherspoon is considered a major awards contender, but Wild may not stand out in a crowded marketplace. A good goal is outgrossing 127 Hours' $18.3 million. Meanwhile, the very slow expansion of The Weinstein Company's The Imitation Game continues to impress. The biopic starring Benedict Cumberbatch earned another $875,000 from just 25 cinemas, upping the film's total to $2 million. With great reviews and many Golden Globe nominations, The Weinstein Company is hoping for a success near the level of true wartime story The King's Speech. Expect the studio to roll out the film in wider release over Christmas. Even though it missed out on a Best Picture - Musical or Comedy berth at the Globes, Paul Thomas Anderson fans still came out in droves for his loopy drug-infused trip, Inherent Vice. The film earned a whopping $330,000 from only five theaters. While that is a spectacular result, it was also a smaller per-theater start than the director's past three films (The Master, There Will Be Blood and Punch-Drunk Love). The film did do slightly better initially than Her, last year's Joaquin Phoenix flick from Warner Bros., which opened to the tune of $260,000 from six theaters after a Wednesday opening. With its convoluted plot and odd humor, though, Inherent Vice may have a hard time breaking out. A nationwide expansion is still set for Jan. 9. Here are the numbers for the Top 10 films at the North American box office for the weekend of December 12 through 14, 2014: 1. Exodus: Gods and Kings – $24.5 million (NEW) 2. The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1 – $13.2 million ($277.4 million total) 3. The Penguins of Madagascar – $7.3 million ($58.8 million total) 4. Top Five – $7.2 million (NEW) 5. Big Hero 6 – $6.1 million ($185.3 million total) 6. Interstellar – $5.5 million ($166.8 million total) 7. Horrible Bosses 2 – $4.6 million ($43.6 million total) 8. Dumb and Dumber To – $2.8 million ($82.1 million total) 9. The Theory of Everything – $2.5 million ($17.1 million total) 10. Wild – $1.6 million ($2.4 million total) NOTE: These numbers are weekend estimates based on Friday and Saturday’s estimated takes. Actual numbers for the three-day weekend are reported on Monday afternoon." ["post_title"]=> string(66) "Box Office Report: Exodus: Gods and Kings Rules Over Quiet Weekend" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(136) "It was another quiet pre-Christmas weekend at the North American box office, as audiences wait to return to Middle Earth this Wednesday." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(55) "box-office-report-exodus-gods-kings-rules-quiet-weekend" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2014-12-14 17:36:31" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2014-12-14 22:36:31" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=398376" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(12) ["current_post"]=> int(-1) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(false) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#372 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(419482) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "387" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-03-31 19:24:53" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-04-01 00:24:53" ["post_content"]=> string(10554) "Interstellar_co_writer_Jonathan_Nolan_to_adapt_Isaac_Asimov_s_Foundation_for_television Jonathan Nolan is one of the most in-demand screenwriters in Hollywood today. His first four screenplays, which he co-wrote with brother Christopher Nolan, are among the top #100 most-loved films according to the Internet Movie Database (The Prestige, The Dark Knight, The Dark Knight Rises and, now, Interstellar). You could even count a fifth title in that grouping if you include his story credit for Memento, for which he received an Oscar nomination. Still, Nolan is not just a potent creative collaborator of one of the world’s biggest directors. He has branched off to become a creative force on the small screen, too. He created the hit CBS drama Person of Interest, which draws in around 10 million viewers a week, and is also hard at work on Westworld, an HBO sci-fi drama set to air later this year based on Michael Crichton’s novel. With an ensemble cast including Anthony Hopkins, Ed Harris, James Marsden, Thandie Newton, Evan Rachel Wood and Jeffrey Wright, it is one of the network’s most hotly anticipated series. Nolan is an innovative thinker and screenwriter and he spoke both fluently and eloquently when I sat down with him this week for an exclusive interview to promote the Blu-Ray release of Interstellar. We talked about working with his brother, thinking about the past to create the future and his hopes for the next years in space exploration. Check it out below, and enjoy! You spent years working on this screenplay for Paramount when your brother came on board. How much of the final film is your original story and what did Chris bring to the film to help shape the drama? Jonathan Nolan: I started working on the project with Kip Thorne and Steven Spielberg back in 2006, and spent years developing it with that team. Chris then came to the project and, as he always does, bring his inimitable sense of non-linear storytelling, but particularly on this film, his heart and his experience as a parent. When I began writing the film, I was not a parent. I have become one since we made the film, though. The emotional aspects of Interstellar are very much, for me, drawn from the experiences of being a child and having that relationship with a parent. But when it came to that parental relationship, Chris came in and shored up that emotional content. For me, in terms of its ambition, I wanted to make a film about the next chapter in the human story, and the chapter in which we have to leave Earth. The more research I did into the science, not just the space exploration but the fossil records and man’s time here on Earth, the more it feels apparent that Earth is a spectacular laboratory for creating life but not necessarily a great environment for sustaining that kind of life. I was just at the Natural History Museum with my daughter yesterday. We were looking at dinosaurs and you think, there’s another epoch. It’s hard to imagine that that era would ever end with these sorts of mighty creatures, and they’re laid low by maybe an asteroid impact, some kind of climate change event. If we want to survive and if we want to thrive, inevitably – and this is a message, we didn’t make this up, echoed by Elon Musk, by Stephen Hawking, by many smart people who have looked at this problem – we have to leave. It doesn’t mean that we have to leave Earth behind forever, but it does mean that our best chance of survival in the long term is to set out, colonize other lands and other environments. [Chris and I] wanted to tell a story that dealt with that chapter and that’s inherently a generational story. It’s not a story of one person, right? Just as manned space flight is not the story of Wernher Von Braun, it’s not the story of Neil Armstrong. It’s the story of all those people… anyone else who has looked up and dreamed. They’re all building on everyone else’s work. That ambition was something very much preserved by the final product and I was very excited about that. Interstellar-5 With a story about a ravaged planet having to look for new habitation elsewhere, the obvious cause to move away today would be to avoid the disastrous effects of climate change. How did the Dust Bowl-inspired “Blight” end up as the launching pad instead? Jonathan Nolan: In thinking about the future – and I spent a lot of time thinking about the future in writing this film – you think a lot about the past and the past’s perception of what the future is going to be like. I wanted a jet pack, but we got Instagram. [Laughs] Kind of a raw deal, but the future is never quite what you imagine it’s going to be. Right now, we’re all focused in on climate change. I think that’s absolutely appropriate and we should be doing everything we can. There were concerns about the Ozone layer and there were concerns when I was a kid about the population bomb. We’ve always found a different way of focusing on it. All of those problems are connected to each other, right. We do tend to refocus on the question every few decades. I think the feeling we were really trying to get at was to recognize that there are simply so many things that could extinguish life on Earth and it’s probably not going to be the thing we thought it was. The problem with living on one planet in one solar system… inevitably, we’re going to perish, if we don’t spread beyond this planet. I spent a memorable afternoon with Kip [Thorne] and a bunch of biologists and astrobiologists talking about all the many different ways that human life can be extinguished at CalTech one day. It was truly sobering. We’d vanish without a trace if we’re not careful, and it might be a slight increase in solar radiation, it could be an asteroid, it could be the bacteria here on earth. Or, in the case in this film as we presented it, we wanted something that was familiar but not necessarily expected: the Blight. Look at the potato famine and the events of those handful of years in Ireland in the 19th century, and then all the blights that are kind of invisible to us right now. The bananas that we eat right now are different than the bananas that we ate growing up as kids and different again from the ones that our parents ate as kids. Because of the way that we factory farm, it encourages the growth of blights that quickly become more efficient at eating our food than we are. The idea of a total blight is a reach but not unimaginable. The environmental impact that that would have, the Dust Bowl – which is something that Chris added, building off the logic of a blight – those effects are catastrophic and they’re within living memory. The Dust Bowl is one of these events that is beautifully immortalized in Ken Burns’ documentary [from 2012] from which some of those clips [seen at the beginning of Interstellar] are taken from. It was one of Chris’s flourishes, a brilliant one, and Ken was kind enough to work with the film on that level. The Dust Bowl has been forgotten by so many. It’s so hard for us to conceive of how destructive and apocalyptic that was. Chris actually had to [tone it] down a little bit. The imagery, the things described by survivors of the Dust Bowl seemed too outlandish and too massive for an audience to even believe. But these were real events… to Americans in the previous century, in living memory. It felt like a great foundation for us to think about the ways in which human life can be extinguished that might come out of nowhere. Interstellar deals with a fantastic voyage and now there is the Mars One concept for the next decade to take a group of human beings and let them establish a colony on Mars. Many in the scientific community are saying it’s technically unfeasible and an enormous risk to those who end up going. What are your thoughts about this ambitious venture? Jonathan Nolan: I’m not familiar with the details of [Mars One] but I’m much more familiar with Elon Musk’s stated goals of getting to Mars and the technical capacity for getting there. I think regardless of the group who’s backing it, I think it’s extremely important. Part of the reason I got this job is I came in and talked to Spielberg about this project he was developing about a current-day, interstellar space exploration. And I said to him, “Here’s the realistic version. It’s 10 minutes long, it doesn’t happen, because the money’s all tied up in budget appropriation and bullshit and we’re not going.” That was a more cynical moment and that was almost 10 years ago. 10 years ago, at that moment, it felt like it was not going to happen. It felt like speech making. Now it feels like there’s a viable model, a partnership potentially between private and public moneys – NASA in partnership with other people – to establish a beachhead elsewhere in the solar system. At the end of several years of working on this project, it feels extremely important to me that we continue a robust program of space exploration and colonization. As goofy as it sounds – and it sounds like a science-fiction movie, right – it sounded goofy that we would ever put people on the moon. It would be sad to think that the only reason we were able to accomplish that was because we were in direct competition with the Soviet Union. We’re not in a Cold War anymore. Can we do this of our own initiative? Can we do this not because it’s a pissing contest with the Russians, but because the global community decides that this is scientifically valuable, and frankly, also potentially a matter of survival? That concludes our interview, but we would like to thank Jonathan Nolan very much for speaking with us. Be sure to pick up Interstellar as it's now available on Blu-Ray." ["post_title"]=> string(55) "Exclusive Interview With Jonathan Nolan On Interstellar" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(456) "Jonathan Nolan is one of the most in-demand screenwriters in Hollywood today. His first four screenplays, which he co-wrote with brother Christopher Nolan, are among the top #100 most-loved films according to the Internet Movie Database. (The Prestige, The Dark Knight, The Dark Knight Rises and, now, Interstellar.) You could even count a fifth title in that grouping if you include his story credit for Memento, for which he received an Oscar nomination." 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