Tag: The Hangover Part III

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[h2]10) R.I.P.D.[/h2] RIPD_stills02 You have to admire Ryan Reynolds. Anyone with as many crappy comic book movies on their resume as him would have given up by now, but I guess the actor is still looking for his Chris Evans moment. After all, Evans spent years in the wilderness of comic book movies as an investment to find his Captain America role. Sadly, R.I.P.D. was another misfire. What could have been cool and funny like Ghostbusters or Men in Black is comparatively derivative and overly elaborate for what should have been a simple story of good ghosts who chase bad ghosts, a kind of supernatural Training Day, if you will. Instead, we get solid actors like Robert Knepper and Kevin Bacon being turned into silly looking CG monsters, a lot of uncharacteristic mugging from Jeff Bridges, and Mary Louise Parker trying to play the stern police captain in white go-go boots with an attitude that’s either bitter resentment about her casting, or her just playing along for the payday. In an added bit of kizmit, R.I.P.D. opened the same weekend as RED 2, the sequel to another film directed by R.I.P.D. helmer Robert Schwentke. Both failed miserably because the filmmakers forgot one thing: you can bring all the ingredients together that you want, but you still have to cook them into something edible. [h2]9) Kick-Ass 2[/h2] kick-ass-2-debut-trailer-goes-for-the-balls Matthew Vaughn’s first Kick-Ass movie walked a fine line between satire and camp and managed to be a fairly sharp deconstruction of the superhero genre with some great characters and outrageous moments. Then there’s Kick-Ass 2, which got all the over-the-top violence right, but what director Jeff Wadlow forgot is any sense of subtlety or finesse. Of course, maybe the fault lay in killing off Nicolas Cage’s character in part one, or maybe Chloë Grace Moretz’s Hit Girl schtick of ultra-violence and coarse language isn’t as funny at 16 as it was 12. Or maybe, Wadlow didn’t realize that there was more to the first Kick-Ass than just a bunch of people in crappy costumes and delusions of super-grandeur. On top of it all, surrounded by a summer slate that included Iron Man 3, Man of Steel, and The Wolverine, Kick-Ass 2 looked cheap by comparison. Forget Jim Carrey’s comments about the film’s violence, what he really should have protested was how he was horribly misused by the filmmakers, and how the entire endeavour was one giant missed opportunity to say something, anything, about our cinematic obsession with super men and women. What could have been a fine piece of summer counter-programming fit too snugly into it and became just another crappy blockbuster, looking to cash in on older, better efforts. [h2]8) The Hangover Part III[/h2] The-Hangover-Part-III-3-Reviews-starring-Bradley-Cooper-Ed-Helms-Zach-Galifianakis-Ken-Jeong-and-John-Goodman While Todd Phillips and the returning gang of The Hangover deserve credit for boldly departing from the previous two installments of the franchise by not allowing Phil, Stu and Alan to descend into another round of debauchery, The Hangover Part III forgot one crucial element: the funny. While Part II was nearly a carbon copy of Part I, it was, at least, amusing, unlike Part III, which was disturbing and ghoulish, and so far from the tone of the first film that the original Hangover might as well be a Three Stooges movie. The primary issue is with the character of Alan (Zach Galifianakis), who is supposed to be a well-meaning innocent, but is played as deranged and psychotic. In clinical terms, Alan has sociopathic tendencies with borderline personality disorder. And as we’re supposed to root for Alan, we’re also supposed to roll on the floor and laugh at the antics of Mr. Chow, who, despite being criminally on par with the worst of America’s Most Wanted, is still great pen pals with Alan. With all the hardcore criminals, including John Goodman’s Marshall, you might mistake this movie for something from the Michael Mann oeuvre, but the result is exactly the same: a very unfunny movie. [h2]7) The Host[/h2] the-host-2013-09 You have to admire Stephanie Meyer for knowing her craft. Unfortunately, her craft is overly chaste teenage melodrama that centres around some kind of love triangle clumsily draped on a fantasy-themed story. With The Host, we get the Twi-fied version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers, and if that sounds terrible in the description, it's even worse in the execution, trust me. Our plucky heroine is implanted with an alien symbiote, but rather than thoughts of rebellion or revolution, we have the human Melanie in love with one hunky boy, and the alien Wanderer in love with another. Say what you want about Robert Pattinson and Taylor Lautner, but at least you can tell them apart; the boy toys of The Host come from such a shallow gene pool, you need a scorecard to know who’s who. No one accused Twilight of being Shakespeare, but its cast had actual chemistry, and when you’re a high school vampire romance story, you’re allowed to get away with being a tad soapy. But if you’re an alien invasion movie with a major plot about human resistance and the nature of identity, it’s best that you don’t squander the majority of your time on what boy the heroine should kiss. [h2]6) Machete Kills[/h2] Danny Trejo in Machete Kills Looking back, I think Robert Rodriguez should have taken the middling success of the first Machete as a sign that he should get out of the grindhouse business. In Machete Kills, Rodriguez didn’t so much as double down on people’s love of vintage exploitation cinema as phone in a lazy, standard sequel effort that banked on the bet that people wanted to see a lot of well-known actors camp it up. Mel Gibson seemed like he was having a good time, as for once no one was focused on his off-screen antics from a few years ago, but a movie has to be about more than career rehab. As to what the point of Machete Kills was, beyond getting hot actresses to look hot and getting serious actors to play funny, I don’t know. Rodriguez doesn’t even try to make the film look vintage, all the supposedly shocking violence seemed unimaginative, and the entire endeavour seemed like a set-up for a third Machete movie that now seems destined to never happen. Honestly, what was it about this that demanded Rodriguez’s attention before making the long-awaited Sin City sequel? Clearly his heart wasn’t in it, so it begs the question, does Danny Trejo has some kind of Svengali effect on Rodriguez? And if he does, does that mean we’ll get the inevitable Machete Kills Again… In Space? Lord, I hope not. Take a look at the (faux) trailer for it below and I think you'll agree. [ctv-1] [h2]5) The Canyons[/h2] the_canyons_1 When Alice Munro won the Nobel Prize for literature earlier this year, Bret Easton Ellis took to his Twitter and said, “Alice Munro was always an overrated writer and now that she's won The Nobel she always will be. The Nobel is a joke and has been for ages…” As a Canadian I was livid, but as someone who subjected himself to The Canyons, the film Ellis wrote, I laughed at the notion of someone putting pen to paper on that script calling anyone “overrated.” But long before The Canyons came out, it was doomed to be a sideshow to the real story: its particularly difficult production, which was chronicled in a now infamous New York Times article. The perfect storm of Ellis, renowned screenwriter and director Paul Schrader, and the ongoing E! True Hollywood disaster that is Lindsay Lohan should have, theoretically, been enough to let the film skate on notoriety, but it’s a tribute to the general public that they didn’t stop to look at this car wreck. Acted with all the finesse of a dinner theatre production of A Streetcar Named Desire, The Canyons couldn’t even find its way to the “so bad, it’s good” category. What the production called for was the deftly bizarre touch of Tommy Wiseau, not the “I’m taking this tripe very seriously” tone that Schrader had. [h2]4) Paranoia[/h2] Paranoia How do you get Harrison Ford and Gary Oldman on the same movie set and make something so tepid? Also, how do you create a film called Paranoia and not drive your hero to such a disheveled state of suspicion and mistrust that no one would want him, even if he does look like Thor’s little brother? As a film, Paranoia plays like mid-90s efforts like The Net or Virtuosity, dabbling in a technology and worldview that the filmmakers seem ill-equipped to understand. The year’s news seemed prime to play into the film’s themes; after all, it’s easy to be paranoid when we know that the government is ready, willing and capable to watch us all, all the time. Also, we know that corporations carry, in some sense, even more power than governments right now, so it’s not too far of a stretch to spin a conspiracy with a simple everyman caught between two rival corporate titans. But Paranoia’s real crime is that it squanders the on-screen re-match between Air Force One adversaries Ford and Oldman. As for Liam Hemsworth, he needs to really decide if the best way to set himself apart from his more famous big bro is to be the poor man’s Channing Tatum. [h2]3) After Earth[/h2] After Earth In the future, humans will ruin the Earth so much that we have to abandon it and set up shop on new worlds. We’ll find out we’re not alone and have to fight alien bugs that sense our fear, but by controlling our emotions though a form of mental discipline called “ghosting,” we’re able to fight them. And, for some reason, we’ll all speak with bizarre accents that make us sound like we’re from Shakespeare, Alabama. Rampant nepotism isn’t After Earth’s worst crime against cinema. In fact, there’s something understandably appealing about having two generations of Smiths on screen together. However, the Smiths show none of the liveliness they’re known for, because it’s demanded of them to employ the school of acting that says everyone in the future is more robotic by nature. Fault for that, I think, falls on director M. Night Shyamalan, who exercises his Serial Killer Earth instincts to the Nth degree, evolving from the killer winds of The Happening to the entire freakin’ planet in After Earth. Hopefully the twist ending in Shyamalan’s career is that he learns to make compelling cinema again. [h2]2) A Good Day to Die Hard[/h2] A Good Day to Die Hard There was a recent news story about the development of a sixth Die Hard movie that would take John McClane to Japan and the home office of Nakatomi to mark the 30th anniversary of the events depicted in the first movie. Oh Lord, how I wish that they had made that movie! Instead, we get some hackneyed story about how McClane must journey to Russia to reconnect with his CIA agent son, and - Surprise! - they hate each other. So what we get is a tired retread of the previous Die Hard films with Jai Courtney’s Jack McClane in the sidekick role, and fittingly, the whole affair was overseen by John Moore, the director of tired retreads of Flight of the Phoenix and The Omen. Between the incomprehensible motivations, unimpressive villains, and Willis’ portrayal of McClane as a grumpy old man Terminator, it’s not hard to see A Good Day to Die Hard as a soulless and pedantic corporate product made solely to capitalize on the “Die Hard” brand name. The franchise that launched a thousand imitators can’t even be bothered to copy the things that made it great in the first place, if it could even remember what those qualities were any more. Maybe we’re all getting too old for this. [h2]1) Movie 43[/h2] movie 43 It’s not exactly a terrible idea in concept, to bring together a bunch of filmmakers and a large ensemble of talented actors for an anthology comedy that pushes boundaries and the envelope. In the case of Movie 43 though, the producers forgot one crucial element in their comedy: the funny. In fact, the synopses of the sketches on Wikipedia are funnier than the actual segments in the film itself. Now, you may think it’s a matter of good taste and bad taste, but it’s mostly a matter of what’s genuinely funny and what’s only funny if you’re a 12-year-old hopped on too much soda and Doritos and flirting with what they think more adult comedy is supposed to look like. All the low-brow highlights are hit: internet porn, menstrual cycles, explosive diarrhea, foul-mouthed leprechauns, and body parts that look like other body parts are all game, but the game is been there/done that, and the prize is two hours you’ll never get back. Usually when all this Hollywood effort is poured into something so pointless, it’s for an awards show like the Golden Globes, but no one’s a winner with Movie 43. So that does it for our list. Are there any films that deserve to be here that you think we left out? If so, sound off in the comments below and let us know which films you hated this year." ["post_title"]=> string(27) "The 10 Worst Movies Of 2013" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(245) "What makes a movie one of the worst of the year? One might think it’s the irrepressible stink of terribleness, but most crummy movies usually have some redeeming qualities, like a cool action sequence, awesome special effects, or Kevin Spacey." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(20) "10-worst-movies-2013" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2014-05-11 21:31:27" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2014-05-12 02:31:27" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=324580" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(2) "33" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#373 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(280355) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2013-06-15 12:27:29" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-06-15 17:27:29" ["post_content"]=> string(2792) "MAN OF STEEL Imagine you're Superman. Shouldn't be hard because at one point in our lives (some later than others) we've all sported the red cape, threw our arms toward the sky and ran endless circles around the backyard. This would go on until mom brought us back to reality with promises of sugar-coated treats. But what if the Man of Steel wasn't exactly who you thought he was? What if he had a secret. A secret so heavily cloaked in mystery that even Clark Kent's glasses would fog up from the shear disbelief. What if Superman liked to party…hard. What's more, what if Superman liked to party hard with the likes of the Hangover 3 crew? Enter the Superhero Hangover. A concept not many would entertain and even fewer could fathom. So now try to imagine you're Superman again, or Zack Galifianakis if you're into being short an hairy, and you've decide it's time to let loose with the fellas…In Vegas…As a superhero with unlimited strength and otherworldly abilities. The infographic below offers up a scenario of what could possibly have gone down had these two cinematic groups joined forces for one night of unadulterated debauchery. Take a look and tell us how you think a night like this would have gone down. Would the Man of Steel really have taken Mike Tyson's tiger cage? Can a superhero even get drunk? How would your favorite superhero fair the likes of The Hangover Part III crew? Did I leave the oven on this morning? These questions must be answered for the greater good of humanity! Let us know your thoughts! And feel free to embed the infographic wherever you please by using the code shown below:
Embed This Image On Your Site (copy code below): Superhero-Hangover[alex]06-14-13_3
" ["post_title"]=> string(59) "Man Of Steel Meets The Hangover Part III In New Infographic" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(300) "Imagine you're Superman. Shouldn't be hard because at one point in our lives (some later than others) we've all sported the red cape, threw our arms toward the sky and ran endless circles around the backyard. This would go on until mom brought us back to reality with promises of sugar-coated treats." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(42) "man-of-steel-hangover-part-iii-infographic" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2013-06-15 16:55:51" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-06-15 21:55:51" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=280355" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#372 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(274301) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "216" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2013-05-22 20:49:43" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-05-23 01:49:43" ["post_content"]=> string(8831) "hangover_part_3_still-620x255 Comedy is a complex issue to discuss, but a simple one to judge. There are many types of cinematic comedies, with wildly varying levels of ambition, but for the most part, the basic barometer for success is an easy one to gauge: Does the film make one laugh? It is as subjective a critical criterion as exists, personal to the specific tastes of the individual, and when it comes to films like The Hangover and its sequels, it is essentially the only question that matters. These are not satires, intent on examining real-world issues through humor, nor do they strive to make any stylistic or aesthetic innovations. While the films live and die by the strength of the ensemble, often doing surprisingly heartfelt and effective work with the relationships of the core trio, any and all elements of character study are secondary to the humor. So when I say that I like The Hangover Part III, oftentimes very much, that mostly means that I laughed, consistently and heavily, from start to finish. I felt the same way about the first film, and even about the second, which I recognize is an unpopular opinion to hold. No matter. My own comedic sensibilities just happen to align with those of the filmmakers, and if you find yourself thinking the same way, I am sure you will have fun with the film as well. It is fairly remarkable for a comedy series to continue delivering laughs even one film past the original, but a comedy threequel being legitimately enjoyable? That is a rare beast indeed, and while Part III is not a great or even hugely memorable comedy, it is certainly of a piece with its predecessors, qualitatively, tonally, and, for the most part, narratively. That may disappoint some of you to hear, as the central problem many had with Part II was its beat-for-beat narrative similarity to the original film. Part III shakes things up to a certain extent, with a story that ditches the drug-fueled memory loss shenanigans of the first two movies in favor of something a tad more straightforward. John Goodman plays a new character, Marshall, a drug lord with connections to the previous adventures of the ‘Wolfpack.’ Marshall was robbed $21 million in gold by Leslie Chow (Ken Jeong), the whirling dervish of cocaine and mayhem who caused so much trouble in the first two films, and kidnaps the perennially off-screen Doug (Justin Bartha) to force Phil (Bradley Cooper), Stu (Ed Helms), and Alan (Zach Galifianakis) to find Chow for him. Despite the paradigm shift, this is still every inch a Hangover movie, with the main characters going from place to place, investigating, getting in trouble, and encountering increasingly ridiculous obstacles on their journey to set things right. It does not feel substantially different from its predecessors, and I cannot really imagine those who took umbrage with Part II for its lack of narrative originality being satisfied with how Part III tinkers with the formula. But comedy sequels are a lose-lose proposition to begin with, at least when it comes to storytelling, and I enjoyed the solution used to make Part II – the original, only exponentially darker – just as I appreciate how co-writer/director Todd Phillips and company have tackled this one, playing with the notion of consequence – the comic fuel of the entire trilogy – as a full-circle means to both humor and finality. That is, after all, exactly what I and so many others found funny about this series in the first place. Where many R-rated comedies find fuel in depicting bad or ridiculous behavior, the Hangover films have always been about what follows immature and irresponsible actions. There is a really twisted, practically disturbed sensibility to so much of the humor in these films – Part II, if pitched even slightly differently, would be downright disturbing (and sometimes is anyway) – because consequences are what follow and haunt us throughout life, and being able to touch that nerve comically is a valuable asset. The Hangover films are at their funniest when they are able to impart a total sense of chaos, of the real danger and total confusion that comes from being in a difficult and incomprehensible situation, and while Part III does not revolutionize the formula, it does cleverly reorient the consequential aspect of the humor so that it stems from everything that happened in the prior films. THE HANGOVER PART III In short, the film is very, very funny, in exactly the way one would expect from a Hangover film, albeit tweaked and enhanced just enough to feel fresh. Tonally, this is a clear return to the atmosphere of the first film, which will be a relief for those who found Part II too dark to laugh at (a sentiment I understand without necessarily agreeing with). The film certainly feels chaotic in all the right ways though, even if some of the plotting is too clean and some of the challenges too simplistic to feel fully satisfying. But in Hangover tradition, when things get out of control, they get very out of control, and extremely funny to boot. The big third act set piece, set at Caesar’s Palace, is wonderfully demented and screamingly hilarious, and the decision to include Leslie Chow in the majority of the action is an inspired one. Ken Jeong is so brilliant in this part, a live-action Looney Tunes cartoon brought to life (albeit one with a cocaine addiction and an extremely violent streak), and making him omnipresent creates the constant, darkly comic sense that could spiral into an anarchic mess at any given mess – which, of course, they frequently do. Much of the humor continues to be character-centric, and the cast is still perfectly up to the task. Especially after Silver Linings Playbook, it is readily apparent that Bradley Cooper could be playing this part in his sleep, but he still comes across as fully engaged, the straight man with the wild edge whose forward-thinking drive is both an asset and a hindrance. Ed Helms loses the core tenant of his shtick this time around – Stu being tormented to ludicrous degrees – but it allows him to play calmer, more human sides of the character. He gets the fewest laughs, but is an important part of the overall chemistry nevertheless. And Zach Galifianakis is, as always, the beating heart and soul of these films, both comically and dramatically. He approaches this part as if it is the role of a lifetime, and earns huge humorous and emotional dividends as a result. Impressively, The Hangover Part III really does feel like a valuable, satisfying conclusion to this series, primarily by honing in on the Galifianakis character and giving him a tight, touching arc that informs where he has been, where he is now, and where he might go in the future. Galifianakis and his rampant insanity are as funny as ever, but there are also so many truly moving moments this time around as Alan faces the challenges of adulthood. As noted before, I do not think Part III innovates narratively in any significant ways, but the new plot structure does allow these characters, and Alan in particular, to be affected by the events of these films, and the finale follows through with a conclusion that, while hardly revelatory, feels entirely fitting for the franchise. A conclusion that is, of course, entirely undercut by a screamingly funny, totally bonkers mid-credits sequence, one that is cynical in the extreme but feels like the proper, sardonic note on which to close the series. Ultimately, The Hangover Part III really does allow audiences to view this unlikely franchise as a trilogy, which is only one of the movie’s unexpected accomplishments. I still would not call any of these films ‘great,’ nor do I necessarily imagine myself revisiting them frequently in the future, but I do find it rather remarkable that one comedy series managed to deliver three solid, often hilarious and clever installments. That’s normally against the rules for this genre, it seems, but absolutely welcome nevertheless. Good laughs can be hard to come by these days, and I appreciate the large dose of fun this final film provides. [springboard type="video" id="702815" player="wgtc007" width="600" height="350" ]" ["post_title"]=> string(29) "The Hangover Part III Review " ["post_excerpt"]=> string(209) "The Hangover Part III is not necessarily a great or hugely memorable comedy, but it is certainly a very, very fun one, of a piece with its predecessors while wrapping the series up in clever, satisfying ways. " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(24) "hangover-part-iii-review" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2013-06-10 10:28:05" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-06-10 15:28:05" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=274301" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#371 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(272228) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2013-05-21 17:02:49" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-05-21 22:02:49" ["post_content"]=> string(18640) "SS1_5647_4 Ken Jeong has experienced a quite the rise to fame over the last couple of years. After catching his first big break in Judd Apatow's Knocked Up, the doctor turned actor went on to make films like Role Models, Pineapple Express, Step Brothers and more. Then, in 2009, director Todd Phillips cast Jeong as Mr. Chow in The Hangover and the rest is, as they say, history. This week The Hangover Part III heads into theatres and Jeong once again reprises his role as the series' villain. Though his part was more of a supporting one in the first two outings, this time he has a much larger role as the entire story basically revolves around him. He has a ton of screen time and is funnier than ever. Recently, Ken Jeong was in Toronto to promote the film and we had the chance to catch up with him for a bit. While talking with us, he discussed some of the stunts he did, a possible Chow spin-off film, his time as a doctor, the evolution of his character and more. Check it out below. We Got This Covered:  Mr. Chow started off as this minor character in the series and now he's blossomed into a major role. Can you talk a bit about how you've developed this character over the three films? Ken Jeong: For me, the seeds were planted in the first film. It was my idea to jump naked out of the trunk. That was my main contribution [laughs]. In the script it said that Chow had clothes on but when I read it, I remember thinking that the scene screamed for Mr. Chow to be naked. And I'm not an exhibitionist at heart. I'm the kind of guy who is so shy about his body that I don't even like to take my shirt off at the beach. But I did feel that because I'm an actor that it was imperative that that had to happen. And that kind of bonded me and Todd Phillips early on. He was kind of amazed that a guy like me, who was only working on the movie for a few days, was willing to just put himself on the line. Whereas in my head I was making a character choice, not a personal choice. So I think that helped Todd widen that spectrum for Chow and really expand his role. We Got This Covered: What do you think it is that these movies resonate so well with people? Ken Jeong: I think Todd's vision is amazing. His relationship with the main three leads is also great. And speaking of them, I cannot say enough good things about Ed, Zach and Bradley. They are the three most egoless, diva-free leads that you can ask to work with. They set the tone for the whole movie. People are always shocked to see how kind of low key we really are in real life. We just save it all for the camera. We have a free exchange of ideas too. I feel like I can say anything to those guys. Just to have that complete trust more than anything is what I’m going to miss about the Hangover franchise and I think that really informed why people see these movies. We Got This Covered: Your character actually gets to do some crazier stuff in this one like parachuting over Las Vegas. Did you get to do any of these things yourself? Ken Jeong: The parachuting thing was actually MANY different stuntmen. I can’t take credit for that. There are some close ups where I was elevated maybe 40 feet while I was outside to simulate some of that intensity, but that's about it. There’s another part of the movie where Chow does a 30 foot free fall and there are hundreds of gallons of water coming out behind him, that was definitely all me. And it was crazy in a way because I was always deathly afraid of heights. But I worked with our stunt coordinator Jack Gill for about six months to sort of desensitize me. Once a week when I was done filming on Community I would go and work with Jack on being in a harness about ten feet in the air to the point where I wouldn’t freak out, and then we would go to fifteen feet, twenty feet, thirty feet. Then subsequently we would graduate to being in the harness and doing things at a fast rate. Then we actually went ahead and did the drop. That was the culmination of about eight weeks of me getting over my own mental block and then actually executing that. That was physically speaking probably the greatest day of my acting career, because just to be able to even for a day conquer some of your own demons for a bit was great and exciting We Got This Covered: Since you didn’t start off as a comedian and you started as a doctor, who were your biggest inspirations to made you want to pursue comedy? Ken Jeong: I grew up loving Richard Pryor, Eddie Murphy and David Letterman. Those guys are geniuses and I’m not, but there was something about how all three of them had this sense of fearlessness that I admired. I also really admired Dana Carvey and Will Ferrell on SNL. I really like Steve Carell and Sacha Baron Cohen too. Those guys really knew how to find what was funny and they could stick really well to themes. I have so many influences that it’s kind of ridiculous. Honestly, Zach and I have been friends for almost 15 years now, and in a way he’s been a really big influence too. Even when we did stand up together he was always the funniest guy there. I have to say that the funniest actor working right now is Zach Galifianakis, and that’s not just because we’re friends or because I’ve worked with him. I’ve worked with just about everyone in comedy at one point or another and no one makes me laugh like Zach, and he knows that. I told him recently that I would gladly just give up my acting career to be his Ed McMahon. I would just get paid to laugh at Zach. That would be a great job, being able to laugh at Zach for the rest of my life. Continue reading on the next page… Ken-Jeong-in-The-Hangover-Part-III--585x390 We Got This Covered: Chow is a really perceptive jerk because he always insults and attack the guys in their own individual ways based on the personalities of their characters. Is that something that starts in the screenplay, something you come up with, or something that you work with the other guys on? Ken Jeong: I think it all just came instinctively. I think there was something in the first movie that I did improvise about why I liked and hated each one of those guys. I think I said to Cooper at first [in Chow voice] “Oh, you’re not my type. You’re too good looking.” Then with Ed, “Oh, I could like you. You have this really ethereal beauty.” Then I look at Zach: “Oh, I like you. You’re fat.” [laughs] It was just all these things weren’t necessarily that personal, but they kinda were. It worked because we were all acquaintances prior to filming the first one. I had done All About Steve with Bradley the year before The Hangover, I knew Zach from stand-up and I had done a movie with Ed called The Goods. So I had a working knowledge of those guys going in, so there was already that instant comfort level and chemistry. But you’re right, Chow does pick on them really specifically. I think there’s an outtake in Hangover III where I just quickly go down the line of all three of them and just say “Hi nerd! Hi fatty! Hi Blue eyes!” He just has this specificity where he can just marginalize these guys in five words or less. We Got This Covered: In this film, the three guys have to now be a lot more serious about what they’ve done in the past, but your character still has to be as crazy as he ever was. How does that factor into how you deal with the guys this time out? Ken Jeong:  Yeah, it definitely changes things, but I have to give a lot of credit to Todd Phillips for that. With Chow, he’s the only character that you can go as far over the top as you want to go. Within the confines of that character, he’s never over the top just for the sake of being over the top, but he’s just always over the top as a person. It all kind of makes a perfect fit for him, but because in this movie Chow has such an expanded role in the story it changes things. I really have to credit Todd this time for helping me shape my performance because sometimes I would just instinctively go for something bigger and he would just reign me in because the dynamics were different this time. In order to go from point A to point B in the plot he would just tell me, “You can’t put any mustard on this one.” Things had to really be a certain way in this one. Like the karaoke scene in this one where I get up and sing. If you give any actor a karaoke mic, I don’t care who it is, they are going to try and sing good. That’s just the ego and the instinct of the actor. So my instinct on this one was to just knock this one out and it would be so great that maybe I would get a Grammy. (laughs) Then Todd just said, “What are you doing? Chow has got to be vulnerable right now.” He needs these guys and there’s a sense of desperation in Chow, and he thought it would be more interesting if he was just an international criminal with this big personality who just can’t go up on stage. Maybe he can sing great in the bathroom or the elevator with the Wolfpack like he did in Hangover II, but he’s completely scared here. That was all Todd, and at the end when Chow knows he did a bad job singing he just swats away the mic, that was all him beat for beat guiding me. I can’t take credit for any of that. When I watch him swat that mic away, I just laugh so hard. That’s what I love about Todd and this specificity of genius he has. He’s my favourite director that I’ve worked with. He knows tone so well and he knows what he wants and he’s always right. He just has this sophistication that I really haven’t seen in comedy. He’s amazing. We Got This Covered: So we know that The Hangover trilogy is complete but is this the end of Mr. Chow? Is it possible that we'll see him return in a spin-off or prequel, perhaps? Ken Jeong: [laughs] From your mouth to God's ears, I'd love that! I'd love to do a Chow spin-off, I've told Todd that. The only problem is, it wouldn't be a Hangover movie. It would be a completely different thing, but I'm confident that it would be possible to do. Chow is my favorite character that I've ever played. So ya, I would love to do a Chow spin-off, I love that character, he just makes me laugh so hard. I'd love to see a Chow origins story or something like that. We Got This Covered: Now that the trilogy is over, what's your favorite memory from this experience? Ken Jeong: There were a lot of nice moments. I remember in the second one all of us were just hanging out at one point and there was just complete silence and stillness. It was me, Bradley, Zach and Ed. And all of us were just thinking about how lucky we are. It was one of those lovely moments. We didn't even say anything. But it just kind of implied that we'll be lifelong friends because we've been through so much together. Continue reading on the next page… MV5BMTU2MDA0NTI4OV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMjkyNDk0OQ@@._V1._SX640_SY427_ We Got This Covered: What’s it like moving between a kind of comedic role in these films to working with people at other ends of the comedic spectrum like Judd Apatow on Knocked Up or Michael Bay on Pain and Gain? Ken Jeong:  Well, you just highlighted my proudest career moments right there. Knocked Up was the first film I had ever done, and Judd Apatow discovered me. I was still a doctor at the time and I was auditioning as a doctor. Seth Rogen had seen my audition tape and he was the one who told Judd about me, and then it was a three month or so auditioning process and search for someone to play that part. I was such a big Freaks and Geeks and Undeclared fan at the time and there were all these people from that at the table read. I still hadn’t gotten the part yet and this table read was my second audition. It was the most nerve wracking audition I had ever had because it was Judd, the studio, and all the actors were there. There was Katherine Heigl, Paul Rudd, Jason Segel, Seth, Jonah (Hill), all these people who have now become superstars are all in this room. I just remember being star struck. It was beyond a dream come true to be a part of that cast. Knocked Up opened the doors for me and then Hangover just burst those doors open all the way. By the time I did The Hangover it just changed my life from black and white to Technicolor. It was kind of like that story of Keith Richards listening to Chuck Berry for the first time. It was just this feeling and this explosion where things just changed and my view of everything just become so vibrant. Every bit of work I had done, including Community, is because I did The Hangover. It’s been amazing. As for working with Michael Bay, we’ve become good friends, actually. He was a big fan of the Hangover movies, and he saw the first movie in Miami with his best friend and he told his buddy, “I gotta put this guy in my next Transformers movie.” A few months later I had a meeting with Michael and I went to meet him and I just couldn’t believe I was sitting in Michael Bay’s office. There’s like a giant Bumblebee from Transformers in his office. I just had so much fun working on Transformers. It was a career highlight for me simply because I never thought in a million years that I would ever be a part of a giant sci-fi franchise. I never thought I would work with a Decepticon. [laughs] It also taught me how to work with something that wasn’t actually there. Michael and Shia (LaBeouf) really coached me on how to pretend there’s something invisible there. It’s harder than you think. It was so much fun. After that was when Michael wrote a part specifically for me in Pain and Gain. It’s just one of the most unexpected career bonuses to be buddies with Michael Bay. I love him. He comes to the Hangover premieres now, as a result. Todd actually at one point had recommended me to Michael for Transformers 3. There’s a lot of relationship between all three of them that have really gotten me where I am. I’m so very grateful to all three of them. We Got This Covered:  Chang from Community and Chow are different characters, but they’re both pretty equally unbalanced. What do you think it is about these types of characters that you find yourself drawn to? Ken Jeong I think Chang is a more pathetic version of Chow. Chow is a well dressed bad ass. Chang wears this Spanish Fly kind of stuff. They’re iconic for different reasons. People ask me all the time who would win in a fight between Chang and Chow. Chow would physically EAT Chang. That’s how dark Chow is. Chang wouldn’t even know what to do. That guy lives in the air vents! Chow lives large. I find myself drawn to villains with a sense of humour. Chow is kind of like Joe Pesci’s character in Goodfellas, or something like that. To me, that makes me laugh. Any villain that can make me laugh is something that I’m just instinctively drawn to for some reason. When it comes to Chang, it’s a bit more of a difficult question to answer because Chang’s been so many different characters. He’s been Kevin. He’s been a teacher. Sometimes I just wonder where these guys are going with this, but the reason I never complain about it is because to me Community has kind of been my own little Steppenwolf theatre. It’s been my acting studio. I’ve learned how to play all sorts of things, I’m glad I never played security guard Chang for four years. I’m glad I never played Spanish teacher Chang for four years. That would be boring. Every year I get to learn how to play someone new! It’s always a different incarnation of Chang, and it’s a real testament to the writers that they’re always able to come up with new things for Chang to do. It’s really hard, and one of the dangers of television is that you’re literally playing the same guy for ten years. No actor really wants to do that unless you’re really in love with the character. Chow is really the only character that I could play life long and never get sick of. There’s just something about him that’s already wide ranging about him. You could have him work at a Kinkos or just do something in a totally different element and I would still be stimulated by the possibilities of it. That’s the exception, but on television with Chang, I just love that I never know what’s going on or what’s going to happen. That’s so much fun and so dangerous. It made me a better actor and it’s only widened my range. Even Todd noticed it between Hangover movies. He said he could see me every year picking up new moves and he said I was a lot more seasoned than the previous movie, and I tell him, “Yeah, that’s Community, man.” When you’re hanging out with Joel McHale and Jim Rash and Danny Pudi and Gillian Jacobs and all these guys, you just can’t help but feel like you’re a part of the most talented cast on TV. Any one of those guys could handle their own sitcom. It’s also amazing that you’re a part of a show that you’re ultimately a fan of. That timeline episode might be my favourite episode of the whole series. That’s such a genius episode. That concludes our interview but we'd like to thank Ken for talking with us. Be sure to check out The Hangover Part III in theatres this Friday!" ["post_title"]=> string(60) "Roundtable Interview With Ken Jeong On The Hangover Part III" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(368) "Ken Jeong has experienced a quite the rise to fame over the last couple of years. After catching his first big break in Judd Apatow's Knocked Up, the doctor turned actor went on to make films like Role Models, Pineapple Express, Step Brothers and more. Then, in 2009, director Todd Phillips cast Jeong as Mr. Chow in The Hangover and the rest is, as they say, history." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(37) "interview-ken-jeong-hangover-part-iii" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2013-08-24 00:10:49" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-08-24 05:10:49" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=272228" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#370 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(272180) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2013-05-15 12:11:26" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-05-15 17:11:26" ["post_content"]=> string(2118) "Relativity Presents A Special Los Angeles Screening Of "Limitless" Ken Jeong has seen his fame skyrocket in the last couple of years. The doctor turned actor got his first big break in Knocked Up and since then he has been on one hell of a hot streak. Though he has credits like Step Brothers, Pineapple Express, Role Models and television's Community under his belt, it was really Todd Phillips' The Hangover and the character of Mr. Chow that brought the actor into the spotlight. While in Toronto to promote The Hangover Part III, the final instalment in the hugely successful trilogy, Jeong took the time to talk with us about his role in the film. The full interview will be published shortly but for now, we wanted to share one interesting tidbit that the actor revealed. When I asked him if his character, Mr. Chow, would be appearing again in a spin-off or prequel, here's what Jeong had to say:
"[laughs] From your mouth to God's ears, I'd love that! I'd love to do a Chow spin-off, I've told Todd that. The only problem is, it wouldn't be a Hangover movie. It would be a completely different thing, but I'm confident that it would be possible to do. Chow is my favorite character that I've ever played. So ya, I would love to do a Chow spin-off, I love that character, he just makes me laugh so hard."
The Hangover Part III hasn't hit theatres yet but having already seen it, I can tell you that Chow has a much larger role than he did in the past two movies. In fact, most of the film revolves around him. If you're not a fan of the character yet, the third outing will likely change that and it should push Jeong even further into the spotlight. He's an extremely funny actor and I, for one, would love to see him reprise his role as Chow in a Hangover spin-off film." ["post_title"]=> string(51) "Ken Jeong Says A Hangover Spin-Off Film Is Possible" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(361) "Ken Jeong has seen his fame skyrocket in the last couple of years. The doctor turned actor got his first big break in Knocked Up and since then he has been on one hell of a hot streak. Though he has credits like Step Brothers, Pineapple Express and Role Models under his belt, it was really Todd Phillips' The Hangover that brought the actor into the spotlight." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(31) "ken-jeong-hangover-spinoff-film" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2013-05-15 21:18:31" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-05-16 02:18:31" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=272180" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [5]=> object(WP_Post)#369 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(269836) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "269" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2013-05-06 13:29:03" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-05-06 18:29:03" ["post_content"]=> string(2334) "The Hangover Part III Remember that movie The Hangover? It was all kinds of funny, about a bachelor party gone horribly wrong? There was Mike Tyson and a tiger and Zach Galifianakis and everyone laughed and there was joy and dancing in the streets? Remember that? Then The Hangover Part II happened and everyone felt a little sad, because it was pretty much the same stuff, only again. And not so funny. Now The Hangover Part III is coming at us and many of us are struggling to care again. I want to be excited about The Hangover Part III, I really do. But the latest clip for the newest outing of the Wolfpack is just not inspiring me with a great sense of hope. Here’s more of the same: Doug (Justin Bartha) is missing, the remaining boys have to figure out how to get him back. There’s no wedding and no bachelor party, so really it’s just our three boys (Bradley Cooper, Zach Galifianakis and Ed Helms) having to deal with more crazy shenanigans. They look kind of tired too. I know the feeling, guys. The supporting cast does give me cause, what with the addition of John Goodman and the return of Heather Graham and Ken Jeong. But really, I do not see what else can possibly happen to these guys that has not already happened once – if not twice – before. I know that Todd Phillips has reliably informed us that we did not understand the inherent amazingness of The Hangover Part II, so maybe we’re just all underestimating the possible amazingness of The Hangover Part III. But he’s going to have to do a lot better than this first clip to get me into the theatre. The Hangover Part III hits theatres May 24. Check out the first clip below and let me know if you think I’m being horribly unfair. Will you pay money to see this movie? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ryY-W9rJ2i8" ["post_title"]=> string(62) "First Clip From The Hangover Part III Brings The Wolfpack Back" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(241) "Remember that movie The Hangover? It was all kinds of funny, about a bachelor party gone horribly wrong? There was Mike Tyson and a tiger and Zach Galifianakis and everyone laughed and there was joy and dancing in the streets? Remember that?" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(39) "clip-hangover-part-iii-brings-wolf-pack" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2013-05-06 16:03:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-05-06 21:03:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=269836" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [6]=> object(WP_Post)#368 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(264431) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2013-04-11 12:32:38" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-04-11 17:32:38" ["post_content"]=> string(2353) " Warner Bros. is getting ready to release The Hangover Part III and the marketing campaign for the film is starting to kick into gear. With just over a month to go until the film hits theatres, anticipation for the finale to Todd Phillips' trilogy is building and today, we have a new trailer as well as several character posters. Admittedly, the first trailer was alright but it didn't give us a good enough look at the film to really get a sense of how the series was going to close off. With this trailer though, we get more on the plot and we can safely say that it will indeed use a different formula than its two predecessors. This time around, from what we can tell, the story concerns Leslie Chow, who stole $21 million from John Goodman's character. Knowing that only the Wolfpack is capable of finding Chow, Goodman's character takes Doug hostage until the boys can lead him to Chow. Poor Doug, once again he's missing out on the action. Though at this point I think that's kind of the running joke. Speaking of jokes, that's the only problem I had with this trailer. The Hangover Part III looks good and all, but I didn't laugh once. Here's hoping that they're saving the best moments for the actual film but from what I saw here, I'm a bit concerned. Even the parts with Chow and Alan didn't have me smiling. Still, The Hangover Part III has me excited. It will be a fitting end to a solid trilogy and getting to see the gang together, back on screen again will be worth the price of admission. The Hangover Part III stars Bradley Cooper, Zach Galifianakis, Ed Helms, Justin Bartha, Ken Jeong, Melissa McCarthy, Jeffrey Tambor, Heather Graham and Jamie Chung. It hits theatres on May 24th, 2013. Check out the new trailer and character posters below and then head to the comments and let us know if you're looking forward to the return of the Wolfpack. [springboard type="video" id="702815" player="wgtc007" width="600" height="350" ] [gallery link="file"]" ["post_title"]=> string(48) "New Theatrical Trailer For The Hangover Part III" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(342) "Warner Bros. is getting ready to release The Hangover Part III and the marketing campaign for the film is starting to kick into gear. With just over a month to go until the film hits theatres, anticipation for the finale to Todd Phillips' trilogy is building and today, we have a new trailer for the film as well as several character posters." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(36) "theatrical-trailer-hangover-part-iii" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2013-04-11 13:47:40" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-04-11 18:47:40" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=264431" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [7]=> object(WP_Post)#367 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(256464) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2013-03-07 13:39:36" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-03-07 18:39:36" ["post_content"]=> string(2278) " At long last it has arrived, the trailer for The Hangover Part III. After getting a look at the poster for the film yesterday, we now have the first trailer, and it's about time. With just over two months to go until the film's release, we were getting worried seeing as we hadn't seen much in the way of marketing. Luckily, the release of this trailer has put our fears to rest as The Hangover Part III looks to be doing away with the structure of the first two films and will be bringing us an entirely new beast. And really, that's the best takeaway from this trailer, is that we'll be getting something entirely new, unlike what we got with the second film which was basically just a clone of the first. We were always promised that the third film would be different and not just another rehash of the same story but until seeing the trailer, I was skeptical. Now, my worries have been put to rest. Additionally, we also get a look at some of the new additions to the cast, with talent like John Goodman and Melissa McCarthy looking to provide some great moments. And then of course there is the giraffe, oh the giraffe. I won't spoil it here but make sure you watch to the end of the trailer, you'll find yourself having a hard time holding in the laughter. Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms, Justin Bartha, Ken Jeong, Melissa McCarthy, Jeffrey Tambor, Heather Graham, Jamie Chung and John Goodman all star in the film, which opens on May 24th. Check out the first trailer for The Hangover Part III below and let us know what you think in the comments. Are you happy to see them moving away from the tired structure of the first two films? Do you think the trilogy will end well? [springboard type="video" id="680673" player="wgtc007" width="600" height="350" ]" ["post_title"]=> string(45) "The Hangover Part III Trailer Finally Arrives" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(515) "At long last it has arrived, the trailer for The Hangover Part III. After getting a look at the poster for the film yesterday, we now have the first trailer, and it's about time. With just over two months to go until the film's release, we were getting worried seeing as we hadn't seen much in the way of marketing. Luckily, the release of this trailer has put our fears to rest as The Hangover Part III looks to be doing away with the structure of the first two films and will be bringing us an entirely new beast." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(41) "hangover-part-iii-trailer-finally-arrives" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(80) " http://wegotthiscovered.com/movies/hangover-part-iii-mocks-harry-potter-poster/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2013-03-07 13:46:04" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-03-07 18:46:04" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=256464" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [8]=> object(WP_Post)#366 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(256300) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2013-03-06 18:04:52" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-03-06 23:04:52" ["post_content"]=> string(2120) "The Hangover Part III This isn't at all what I expected from the marketing campaign for The Hangover Part III but I like it nonetheless. What we have here is a parody poster for the film, which makes fun of the iconic poster for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part II. While we wait for the trailer to drop tomorrow, this poster will have to do, and it's pretty amusing. It reminds us that "It All Ends" with the third entry in the franchise, which may be a good, or bad, thing depending on how this one turns out. Admittedly, the joke they are teasing about is two years old already, so not sure why they decided to mock it. That being said, it did make me smile, so I suppose it achieved its desired effect. There's also a nice reminder of the gang's return to Vegas in the background, though I doubt they are going to cause all that destruction. Who knows though? All we know about the story is that it "brings the group together when something from the first movie comes back to haunt them." So really, at this point, anything is possible. Overall, it's just nice to see the marketing campaign finally picking up for this one, since we've seen next to nothing from the film so far and it arrives in just a few months. I'm pretty stoked to see the trailer tomorrow and of course, we'll have it for you as soon as it's available, so make sure to check back throughout the day. The Hangover Part III arrives on May 24th, 2013. We've inserted both the Harry Potter and Hangover posters below, so you can compare the two. Check them out and let us know what you think in the comments. Clever marketing or lame poster? [gallery link="file"]" ["post_title"]=> string(54) "The Hangover Part III Mocks Harry Potter In New Poster" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(253) "This isn't at all what I expected from the marketing campaign for The Hangover Part III but I like it nonetheless. What we have here is a parody poster for the film, which makes fun of the iconic poster for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part II." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(43) "hangover-part-iii-mocks-harry-potter-poster" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2013-03-12 22:02:54" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-03-13 03:02:54" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=256300" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [9]=> object(WP_Post)#365 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(253032) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "334" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2013-02-22 21:21:47" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-02-23 02:21:47" ["post_content"]=> string(2517) "The Hangover Part III The Hangover Part III seems to be in the same boat as The Wolverine when it comes to giving the audience a taste before delivering the main course. With the former coming out in three months, Todd Phillips is keeping us occupied with a couple of images until we see the real deal in theaters. The third and final movie of The Hangover franchise will follow the Wolfpack, with Alan at the center of the story. Phillips has promised that this installment will not be a reproduction of its predecessors, as The Hangover Part II basically followed the storyline of the first one and ended up disappointing a lot of fans. Some critics also mentioned that the movie lacked the element of surprise and perhaps this is why we don’t know much about the plot of The Hangover Part III. Hopefully, Phillips is using that as an advantage to deliver on his promise and provide us with something refreshing. The images depict the main characters, with Bradley Cooper reprising his role as Phil Wenneck, Ed Helms as Dr. Stu Price, Zach Galifianakis as Alan Garner and Ken Jeong as Mr. Chow. The first image shows Phil, Stu and Alan looking quite confused. We can only guess that they’ve gotten themselves into trouble again, especially with that cop car behind them. The second image shows Mr. Chow in front of a microphone and pretty much emphasizes how big his part will be in the upcoming movie. The movie also stars Heather Graham, John Goodman, Justin Bartha, Melissa McCarthy, Jamie Chung, Mike Tyson, Mike Epps and Sasha Barrese. With a script written by Craig Mazin and the director, The Hangover Part III will hit theaters on May 24, 2013. In the meantime, what do you think about the photos? Are you looking forward to the last movie of the franchise? What do you think about the story focusing on Alan? The Hangover Part III" ["post_title"]=> string(41) "The Hangover Part III Reveals New Images " ["post_excerpt"]=> string(292) "The Hangover Part III seems to be in the same boat as The Wolverine when it comes to giving the audience a taste before delivering the main course. With the former coming out in three months, Todd Phillips is keeping us occupied with a couple of images until we see the real deal in theaters." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(41) "the-hangover-part-iii-releases-new-images" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2013-02-25 21:08:24" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-02-26 02:08:24" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=253032" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [10]=> object(WP_Post)#364 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(237932) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2012-12-16 21:03:08" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2012-12-17 02:03:08" ["post_content"]=> string(2838) " Although The Hangover Part II was nearly identical to its predecessor in terms of plot, the third entry in Todd Phillips' successful series is heading in a totally new direction. Or at least that's what we've been told. Up until this point, very little has been said about The Hangover Part III and other than hearing something about a possible road trip for the gang, we really don't know what Stu, Phil and Alan will be up to come May 2013. Earlier this week though, Phillips finally opened up to Entertainment Weekly, telling them that "The Hangover Part III is Alan's story. He's going through a crisis after the death of his father, [and] the Wolfpack is all he has." He then went onto say that "the movie is a fitting end to this three-part opera of mayhem and bad decisions." EW also provided more details, telling us that the film "brings the group together when something from the first movie comes back to haunt them." As for what that "something" could be is anyone's guess. So there you have it, it's not a whole lot to go on but hopefully what we've heard is correct and not just a false promise. The Hangover Part II was an incredibly dull and lazy film, one that provided absolutely nothing new. It was so similar to The Hangover that it was infuriating. If The Hangover Part III is just another rehash moviegoers are going to be extremely upset. This is the final adventure for the Wolfpack so it better be something new and exciting. From the sounds of it, we should have nothing to worry about but until we at least see a trailer, I remain skeptical. Set to hit theaters on May 24, 2013, The Hangover Part III stars Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms and Zach Galifianakis. Check out an additional photo from the film below, which EW released along with the one above. " ["post_title"]=> string(43) "The Hangover Part III Plot Details Revealed" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(442) "Although The Hangover Part II was nearly identical to its predecessor in terms of plot, the third entry in Todd Phillips' successful series is heading in a totally new direction. Or at least that's what we've been told. Up until this point, very little has been said about The Hangover Part III and other than hearing something about a possible road trip for the gang, we really don't know what Stu, Phil and Alan will be up to come May 2013." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(39) "hangover-part-iii-plot-details-revealed" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2012-12-16 21:14:15" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2012-12-17 02:14:15" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=237932" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [11]=> object(WP_Post)#363 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(200553) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2012-11-09 21:48:33" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2012-11-10 02:48:33" ["post_content"]=> string(1868) " With The Hangover Part III currently in production, photos are starting to escape from the set and the newest bunch come to us via director Todd PhillipsInstagram account. While there's nothing too telling here, we do see a shot of the gang at a funeral (whose could it be? Maybe Alan?) as well as two men in pig masks (we're not even going to try and guess what's going on there). Aside from that though, the photos are pretty standard fare. Set to arrive in theaters on May 24, 2013, I can't say I'm too excited for the return of the Wolfpack. The Hangover Part II was laughably bad and an exact clone of its predecessor. Admittedly, the filmmakers have said that part trois will take the story in another direction but I remain skeptical. Supposedly, the film will take the gang to LA, Tijuana and then back to Vegas, which could be interesting. Plus, there's also the inclusion of John Goodman, whose always a great addition to any cast. That and the excellent chemistry that Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms and Zach Galifianakis have are really the only good things going for the film. So who knows, The Hangover Part III may surprise us. But probably not. Check out the photos below and let us know what you think. [gallery link="file"]" ["post_title"]=> string(47) "Instagram Photos From The Hangover Part III Set" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(432) "With The Hangover Part III currently in production, photos are starting to escape from the set and the newest bunch come to us via director Todd Phillips' Instagram account. While there's nothing too telling here, we do see a shot of the gang at a funeral (whose could it be?) as well as two men in pig masks (we're not even going to try and guess what's going on there). Aside from that though, the photos are pretty standard fare." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(38) "instagram-photos-hangover-part-iii-set" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2012-11-09 23:43:32" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2012-11-10 04:43:32" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://wegotthiscovered.com/?p=200553" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(12) ["current_post"]=> int(-1) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(false) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#374 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(324580) ["post_author"]=> string(3) "357" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2013-12-24 13:10:00" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2013-12-24 18:10:00" ["post_content"]=> string(16761) "After Earth What makes a movie one of the worst of the year? One might think it’s the irrepressible stink of terribleness, but most crummy movies usually have some redeeming qualities, like a cool action sequence, awesome special effects, or Kevin Spacey. So what makes a Top 10 Worst Film of the year? One of two things: either ambition let down by the inadequate talent of the filmmakers, or a complete failure of all the films' faculties, from the acting, the script, the direction and on down through the movie chain of command to the catering. The year 2013 had a lot of contenders for the not-so coveted Worst of the Year prize, but whether the movie was an unnecessary sequel, a teen romance in sci-fi clothing, or another chance for a coked-up/washed out movie star to get her career back, these 10 films all have one thing in common: they were really hard to sit through. If you're looking for a truly unenjoyable viewing experience, then feel free to watch any of the titles listed in this article. [h2]10) R.I.P.D.[/h2] RIPD_stills02 You have to admire Ryan Reynolds. Anyone with as many crappy comic book movies on their resume as him would have given up by now, but I guess the actor is still looking for his Chris Evans moment. After all, Evans spent years in the wilderness of comic book movies as an investment to find his Captain America role. Sadly, R.I.P.D. was another misfire. What could have been cool and funny like Ghostbusters or Men in Black is comparatively derivative and overly elaborate for what should have been a simple story of good ghosts who chase bad ghosts, a kind of supernatural Training Day, if you will. Instead, we get solid actors like Robert Knepper and Kevin Bacon being turned into silly looking CG monsters, a lot of uncharacteristic mugging from Jeff Bridges, and Mary Louise Parker trying to play the stern police captain in white go-go boots with an attitude that’s either bitter resentment about her casting, or her just playing along for the payday. In an added bit of kizmit, R.I.P.D. opened the same weekend as RED 2, the sequel to another film directed by R.I.P.D. helmer Robert Schwentke. Both failed miserably because the filmmakers forgot one thing: you can bring all the ingredients together that you want, but you still have to cook them into something edible. [h2]9) Kick-Ass 2[/h2] kick-ass-2-debut-trailer-goes-for-the-balls Matthew Vaughn’s first Kick-Ass movie walked a fine line between satire and camp and managed to be a fairly sharp deconstruction of the superhero genre with some great characters and outrageous moments. Then there’s Kick-Ass 2, which got all the over-the-top violence right, but what director Jeff Wadlow forgot is any sense of subtlety or finesse. Of course, maybe the fault lay in killing off Nicolas Cage’s character in part one, or maybe Chloë Grace Moretz’s Hit Girl schtick of ultra-violence and coarse language isn’t as funny at 16 as it was 12. Or maybe, Wadlow didn’t realize that there was more to the first Kick-Ass than just a bunch of people in crappy costumes and delusions of super-grandeur. On top of it all, surrounded by a summer slate that included Iron Man 3, Man of Steel, and The Wolverine, Kick-Ass 2 looked cheap by comparison. Forget Jim Carrey’s comments about the film’s violence, what he really should have protested was how he was horribly misused by the filmmakers, and how the entire endeavour was one giant missed opportunity to say something, anything, about our cinematic obsession with super men and women. What could have been a fine piece of summer counter-programming fit too snugly into it and became just another crappy blockbuster, looking to cash in on older, better efforts. [h2]8) The Hangover Part III[/h2] The-Hangover-Part-III-3-Reviews-starring-Bradley-Cooper-Ed-Helms-Zach-Galifianakis-Ken-Jeong-and-John-Goodman While Todd Phillips and the returning gang of The Hangover deserve credit for boldly departing from the previous two installments of the franchise by not allowing Phil, Stu and Alan to descend into another round of debauchery, The Hangover Part III forgot one crucial element: the funny. While Part II was nearly a carbon copy of Part I, it was, at least, amusing, unlike Part III, which was disturbing and ghoulish, and so far from the tone of the first film that the original Hangover might as well be a Three Stooges movie. The primary issue is with the character of Alan (Zach Galifianakis), who is supposed to be a well-meaning innocent, but is played as deranged and psychotic. In clinical terms, Alan has sociopathic tendencies with borderline personality disorder. And as we’re supposed to root for Alan, we’re also supposed to roll on the floor and laugh at the antics of Mr. Chow, who, despite being criminally on par with the worst of America’s Most Wanted, is still great pen pals with Alan. With all the hardcore criminals, including John Goodman’s Marshall, you might mistake this movie for something from the Michael Mann oeuvre, but the result is exactly the same: a very unfunny movie. [h2]7) The Host[/h2] the-host-2013-09 You have to admire Stephanie Meyer for knowing her craft. Unfortunately, her craft is overly chaste teenage melodrama that centres around some kind of love triangle clumsily draped on a fantasy-themed story. With The Host, we get the Twi-fied version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers, and if that sounds terrible in the description, it's even worse in the execution, trust me. Our plucky heroine is implanted with an alien symbiote, but rather than thoughts of rebellion or revolution, we have the human Melanie in love with one hunky boy, and the alien Wanderer in love with another. Say what you want about Robert Pattinson and Taylor Lautner, but at least you can tell them apart; the boy toys of The Host come from such a shallow gene pool, you need a scorecard to know who’s who. No one accused Twilight of being Shakespeare, but its cast had actual chemistry, and when you’re a high school vampire romance story, you’re allowed to get away with being a tad soapy. But if you’re an alien invasion movie with a major plot about human resistance and the nature of identity, it’s best that you don’t squander the majority of your time on what boy the heroine should kiss. [h2]6) Machete Kills[/h2] Danny Trejo in Machete Kills Looking back, I think Robert Rodriguez should have taken the middling success of the first Machete as a sign that he should get out of the grindhouse business. In Machete Kills, Rodriguez didn’t so much as double down on people’s love of vintage exploitation cinema as phone in a lazy, standard sequel effort that banked on the bet that people wanted to see a lot of well-known actors camp it up. Mel Gibson seemed like he was having a good time, as for once no one was focused on his off-screen antics from a few years ago, but a movie has to be about more than career rehab. As to what the point of Machete Kills was, beyond getting hot actresses to look hot and getting serious actors to play funny, I don’t know. Rodriguez doesn’t even try to make the film look vintage, all the supposedly shocking violence seemed unimaginative, and the entire endeavour seemed like a set-up for a third Machete movie that now seems destined to never happen. Honestly, what was it about this that demanded Rodriguez’s attention before making the long-awaited Sin City sequel? Clearly his heart wasn’t in it, so it begs the question, does Danny Trejo has some kind of Svengali effect on Rodriguez? And if he does, does that mean we’ll get the inevitable Machete Kills Again… In Space? Lord, I hope not. Take a look at the (faux) trailer for it below and I think you'll agree. [ctv-1] [h2]5) The Canyons[/h2] the_canyons_1 When Alice Munro won the Nobel Prize for literature earlier this year, Bret Easton Ellis took to his Twitter and said, “Alice Munro was always an overrated writer and now that she's won The Nobel she always will be. The Nobel is a joke and has been for ages…” As a Canadian I was livid, but as someone who subjected himself to The Canyons, the film Ellis wrote, I laughed at the notion of someone putting pen to paper on that script calling anyone “overrated.” But long before The Canyons came out, it was doomed to be a sideshow to the real story: its particularly difficult production, which was chronicled in a now infamous New York Times article. The perfect storm of Ellis, renowned screenwriter and director Paul Schrader, and the ongoing E! True Hollywood disaster that is Lindsay Lohan should have, theoretically, been enough to let the film skate on notoriety, but it’s a tribute to the general public that they didn’t stop to look at this car wreck. Acted with all the finesse of a dinner theatre production of A Streetcar Named Desire, The Canyons couldn’t even find its way to the “so bad, it’s good” category. What the production called for was the deftly bizarre touch of Tommy Wiseau, not the “I’m taking this tripe very seriously” tone that Schrader had. [h2]4) Paranoia[/h2] Paranoia How do you get Harrison Ford and Gary Oldman on the same movie set and make something so tepid? Also, how do you create a film called Paranoia and not drive your hero to such a disheveled state of suspicion and mistrust that no one would want him, even if he does look like Thor’s little brother? As a film, Paranoia plays like mid-90s efforts like The Net or Virtuosity, dabbling in a technology and worldview that the filmmakers seem ill-equipped to understand. The year’s news seemed prime to play into the film’s themes; after all, it’s easy to be paranoid when we know that the government is ready, willing and capable to watch us all, all the time. Also, we know that corporations carry, in some sense, even more power than governments right now, so it’s not too far of a stretch to spin a conspiracy with a simple everyman caught between two rival corporate titans. But Paranoia’s real crime is that it squanders the on-screen re-match between Air Force One adversaries Ford and Oldman. As for Liam Hemsworth, he needs to really decide if the best way to set himself apart from his more famous big bro is to be the poor man’s Channing Tatum. [h2]3) After Earth[/h2] After Earth In the future, humans will ruin the Earth so much that we have to abandon it and set up shop on new worlds. We’ll find out we’re not alone and have to fight alien bugs that sense our fear, but by controlling our emotions though a form of mental discipline called “ghosting,” we’re able to fight them. And, for some reason, we’ll all speak with bizarre accents that make us sound like we’re from Shakespeare, Alabama. Rampant nepotism isn’t After Earth’s worst crime against cinema. In fact, there’s something understandably appealing about having two generations of Smiths on screen together. However, the Smiths show none of the liveliness they’re known for, because it’s demanded of them to employ the school of acting that says everyone in the future is more robotic by nature. Fault for that, I think, falls on director M. Night Shyamalan, who exercises his Serial Killer Earth instincts to the Nth degree, evolving from the killer winds of The Happening to the entire freakin’ planet in After Earth. Hopefully the twist ending in Shyamalan’s career is that he learns to make compelling cinema again. [h2]2) A Good Day to Die Hard[/h2] A Good Day to Die Hard There was a recent news story about the development of a sixth Die Hard movie that would take John McClane to Japan and the home office of Nakatomi to mark the 30th anniversary of the events depicted in the first movie. Oh Lord, how I wish that they had made that movie! Instead, we get some hackneyed story about how McClane must journey to Russia to reconnect with his CIA agent son, and - Surprise! - they hate each other. So what we get is a tired retread of the previous Die Hard films with Jai Courtney’s Jack McClane in the sidekick role, and fittingly, the whole affair was overseen by John Moore, the director of tired retreads of Flight of the Phoenix and The Omen. Between the incomprehensible motivations, unimpressive villains, and Willis’ portrayal of McClane as a grumpy old man Terminator, it’s not hard to see A Good Day to Die Hard as a soulless and pedantic corporate product made solely to capitalize on the “Die Hard” brand name. The franchise that launched a thousand imitators can’t even be bothered to copy the things that made it great in the first place, if it could even remember what those qualities were any more. Maybe we’re all getting too old for this. [h2]1) Movie 43[/h2] movie 43 It’s not exactly a terrible idea in concept, to bring together a bunch of filmmakers and a large ensemble of talented actors for an anthology comedy that pushes boundaries and the envelope. In the case of Movie 43 though, the producers forgot one crucial element in their comedy: the funny. In fact, the synopses of the sketches on Wikipedia are funnier than the actual segments in the film itself. Now, you may think it’s a matter of good taste and bad taste, but it’s mostly a matter of what’s genuinely funny and what’s only funny if you’re a 12-year-old hopped on too much soda and Doritos and flirting with what they think more adult comedy is supposed to look like. All the low-brow highlights are hit: internet porn, menstrual cycles, explosive diarrhea, foul-mouthed leprechauns, and body parts that look like other body parts are all game, but the game is been there/done that, and the prize is two hours you’ll never get back. Usually when all this Hollywood effort is poured into something so pointless, it’s for an awards show like the Golden Globes, but no one’s a winner with Movie 43. So that does it for our list. Are there any films that deserve to be here that you think we left out? If so, sound off in the comments below and let us know which films you hated this year." 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