Is something wrong with Jeff Bezos’ eye?

Jeff-Bezos
Emma McIntyre/Getty Images

There’s a linty of things Jeff Bezos is known for. He’s known for being the founder and CEO of Amazon; for creating the now-largest retailer in the world; for being one of the richest people in the world; for being the former husband to MacKenzie Scott; and for flying into space in a questionably shaped space shuttle, among other things.

Truly, he’s known for more than can be detailed in anything other than a full-length exposé. However, there’s one thing the multi-billionaire is known for that has nothing to do with his success, but has caught people’s eyes all the same, and that’s his, well, eye.

The shape of his eye, to be exact. For years people have commented on the fact that one of his eyes appears to be significantly larger than the other, specifically when smiling. Some have attributed this to a medical condition while others have gone so far as to say he wears a glass eye. So, which is it?

Is there something wrong with Jeff Bezos’ eye?

Jeff-Bezos
Mireya Acierto/Getty Images

As much as we wish we could have perfectly symmetrical features or poreless skin or whatever else society deems as “right”, at the end of the day that’s hardly the case for most people, and the same is true for Bezos.

Some have speculated the asymmetry in Bezos’ eyes is because he wears a glass eye — or, at the very least, a prosthetic one as prosthetic eyes are usually made out of acrylic nowadays, not glass — but that doesn’t seem to be the case. When he speaks on camera, both of his eyes appear to move in tandem with one another and naturally shift as a result of his facial expressions, thus ruling out the possibility of a prosthetic.

What’s more likely is he has a droopy eye, otherwise known as ptosis, not to be confused with a lazy eye. A lazy eye typically involves an eye, or eyes, that wanders or doesn’t work in conjunction with the other. Droopy eye, on the other hand, occurs when the muscles that raise the upper eyelid weaken or stretch, causing the eyelid to sag lower than normal. The condition is usually genetic and can be treated with surgery, although unless the drooping eyelid is affecting one’s vision there isn’t much reason to seek surgery other than for superficial reasons.

It isn’t known for certain whether Bezos does indeed have a droopy eye, or ptosis, as he hasn’t spoken on the matter, nor have any medical records been released, but it seems much more likely than a prosthetic eye. Until such confirmation is made we’ll have to get by with our speculations and make do with keeping a close eye on the matter.