Fear Street Part 4 Reportedly In The Works At Netflix

Sadie Sink Fear Street 1978 Clip

The Fear Street trilogy couldn’t have been more successful for Netflix, as the recent unique blend of movies and TV – three films released weekly, like TV episodes – proved to be a major crossover hit, with the marketing boldly claiming them to be “the movie event of the summer”. It’s no surprise, then, that the latest intel is pointing to the streaming giant already working on a second trilogy in the franchise.

Small Screen is reporting that “a source close to Netflix” has informed them that the studio is knee-deep in Fear Street 4 and is also developing two more films to follow it that would be come together to form another trio of films. As per SS’s source, these movies will move the timeline closer to contemporary times:

Scripts are already being written for Fear Street 4 and beyond. Netflix would like to make another trilogy and these new films will be set closer to the present day.

It’s obviously too early for casting details, but Small Screen notes that their source told them “it’s looking likely” that director Leigh Janiak will be back to helm this trilogy, just as she directed all three previous installments.

fear street

The Fear Street trilogy is loosely based on the original teen horror books by Goosebumps creator R.L. Stine, though Netflix reimagined the IP to suit a more mature audience, throwing in a surprising amount of gore and scares that put the movies closer to the Scream saga than many were expecting. But if they’re looking to pull more ideas from Stine’s work, the author penned a ton of Fear Street titles – we’re talking well over 100 – from the first wave in 1989 to the Fear Street Nights trilogy in 2005. Overall, they’ve sold over 80 million copies worldwide.

So there’s easily the potential for Netflix to keep pumping these out yearly, perhaps approaching each trilogy like a TV season. But for now we’re hearing that there is definitely a second batch of Fear Street films on the way.

Source: Small Screen