Latest ’Yellowstone’ News: Fans question the earliest Dutton villains as we ponder the main rule at the Yellowstone Dutton Ranch

Paramount

It’s the end of another week, and Yellowstone fans are one day closer to the emotional season five premiere of the Dutton family series. It’s been an exciting week, so things have slowed down a little bit on this lovely Friday as we soak in all of the news from the week. From the premiere date of the Yellowstone prequel, 1923, being announced to new teaser trailers and invitations to see the Duttons on the big screen — it’s been a busy week for fans. Today, much news in the realm is happening between fans as they chat on Reddit about different villains and rules that the Duttons face. You know the drill from here; grab your favorite drink and bestie, and let’s ride in!

Fans are asking about some of the first Dutton enemies

When we think back on the villains from Yellowstone, there are several who have stood up to fight against the family we’ve grown to love and care about. For their own reasons, they want the land, the rights, and the bragging power of saying they’ve come up victorious against the family.

A thread on Reddit is asking a question about some of the earliest Dutton enemies fans met on Yellowstone; those pesky Beck brothers.

Why exactly did the brothers go for the Dutton family so hard and so fast? What was the motivation behind their attempt to attack someone as powerful as John, someone they knew would fight to protect their family with such vigor?

There are episodes where the Becks explain what they want from John and why he is a threat to them, but it’s not ever explained in one picture-perfect way, and it sort of unfolds as the series does.

However, a Reddit comment sums it up nicely and lets fans who might have missed pieces easily understand their zealous hate for the Duttons.

The comment also gives a bit of a theory into why things escalated so quickly, making a lot of sense. Taylor Sheridan doesn’t give us all the pieces at once, he makes fans wait for it, and sometimes we’ve got to work for it — but we always figure it out in the end, and we find out that we’ve learned a lot more that way, too.

This comment highlights another part of the equation between the Becks, Duttons, Rainwater, and Jenkins.

As we’ve said before, there are several pieces of the puzzle that we’re still uncovering, but it’s an exciting one, and fans are happy to be patient while we figure it out.

Viewers question the number one rule at the Yellowstone Dutton Ranch

Another Reddit thread talked about the significant rule at the Yellowstone Dutton Farm, no fighting unless you want to fight Rip. They know that when an argument ensues, it’s best to handle it with words vs. throwing the first punch because it’ll soon be an all-out brawl with Rip.

Of course, it’s not just a one-time battle with Rip; you also end up a little lower on the totem pole after the fight. You have to have some audacity to step up against Rip, and you’ve got to understand that it means you have indeed lost a little bit of your mind, too.

Fans quoted the infamous quote from Rip where he tells ranch hands what they can do if they get the wild hair to fight.

Some fans also said that the farm rule is a warning of sorts too.

One of the biggest fights at the ranch was between Rip and Lloyd, which was heartbreaking. No one wanted the two to fight, especially because they’re such beloved characters and good friends.

Rip and Lloyd didn’t want to fight one another either, but it had to happen; Lloyd and Walker had gotten into a spat when punches were thrown. When it was found out that the two had been fighting, Rip told Lloyd that he knew what would happen next; and fans were distraught.

Yellowstone rewind: Season three, episode four

Yellowstone‘s fourth episode in season three was called “Going back to Cali,” and the main point of contention here was bikers who broke into the Dutton family land and made themselves an excellent spot for the afternoon.

Of course, unwelcome guests aren’t a Dutton family favorite, and when some of the ranch hands went to ask them to go back on the public property side of the land, they weren’t too keen on moving.

A fight soon broke out, and it was intense, to say the very least, with Teeter throwing a punch at one of the female bikers, and the boys began brawling, too. When Rip and Lloyd saw the bikes parked alongside the landscape, he drove forward quickly and ran them all over; the right stopped immediately, but tensions got even higher.

The bikers were suddenly upset that someone else had touched their possessions (how ironic, isn’t it). Of course, Rip and Lloyd came down for some of the action, too, ending rather quickly after that. Of course, the bikers always intended to return after dark and get revenge.

Someone was waiting there after dark, and it was none other than John Dutton himself. He knew that they’d be back after a while, and he had the ultimate punishment for them. If they had the audacity to come back to his land after they’d been asked to leave, he would make a place for them that would be more: permanent.

Making the bikers dig their holes for their death, John sat there and watched them craft their final resting place all on their own accord. Looking down at them was a moment of intensity we don’t often see in John. His ranch hands are out doing the work to protect them most often, and it’s not that he can’t take care of himself; it’s that they like to do it.

This, on the other hand, is something John wanted to do on his own. He got joy from making it happen and tried to teach them a lesson. The lesson was certainly learned, and the bikers promised they’d go back to California and never to the state of Montana.

Is that ringing a bell now? Yep. The title of the episode is set around that specific scene, and with good reason. It’s definitely one of John’s finest moments.