Cyberpunk 2077 Launch Issues Cost The Founders $1 Billion

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CD Projekt RED has been dealt yet another blow in the sorry story that has become Cyberpunk 2077‘s launch.

The highly anticipated RPG, which currently is only available for last-gen consoles (Xbox One/One X and PlayStation 4/Pro) and PC, has been utterly slammed by many for falling far short of performance standards, not only for struggling to maintain a consistent frame rate, but a cavalcade of technical issues ranging from visual glitches to outright game-breaking bugs. So huge has the discrepancy been between versions, in fact, that aggregate sites and reviews have since taken steps to inform consumers of the differences, with some even going so far as to accuse the developer of intentionally preventing console footage from being shown to the press or public until after launch.

CDPR has since outlined a series of patches on course to arrive throughout December and the New Year aimed at fixing the most egregious problems, though some fans have opted instead to request full refunds.

Cyberpunk 2077

The bad news doesn’t end there, either, as a recent report published by Bloomberg now suggests that company co-founders and executives Marcin Iwinski, Adam Kicinski and Piotr Nielubowics, three of Poland’s wealthiest people, have suffered a loss of around $1 billion on the Warsaw Stock Exchange. Collectively, the trio own a 34% stake in CD Projekt RED which, as of Tuesday’s market close, was valued at roughly $3 billion.

Can the studio ever hope to recoup its losses and reestablish trust with consumers? It’s certainly not impossible, though a statement provided to Bloomberg by industry analyst Tomasz Rodak believes that mending broken bridges will take “much time and effort” as there is “now a huge scar on the reputation of both the studio and its management.”

We suspect this won’t be the last occasion that Cyberpunk 2077 makes headlines for all the wrong reasons, but in the meantime, be sure to let us know what you think of these latest developments in the usual place below.

Source: Bloomberg

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