Midnights Taylor Swift
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Swifties insist cryptic ‘Midnights’ lyrics obviously point to Taylor Swift’s ex-flame

It's not over, Dear John.

Never mind “Dear John (Taylor’s Version),” which will eventually release as part of the re-recorded Speak Now album. Taylor Swift knows all too well just how much her fans love the tea when it comes to her past relationships, so naturally, one of the tracks from Midnights is making unmistakable references to her scrutinized relationship with John Mayer. At least, that’s what Swifties are saying on social media.

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Today saw the hotly anticipated release of Midnights across different music platforms. Alongside the announced lineup, which consists of 13 songs, Miss Americana announced seven surprise bonus tracks under the moniker of Midnights – 3am Edition, so you know that T-Swizzle is taking no prisoners when it’s the unruly hours of dusk as she sets about writing new music.

It seems that one of these bonus tracks – “Would’ve, Could’ve, Should’ve” – is garnering a lot of attention on Twitter for a very familiar reason. Because if you thought Taylor was done slaying her former partners because folklore and evermore blissfully took a storytelling detour, you’ll be in for one helluva hilarious surprise.

As ever, she’s being smart about it on top of everything else.

Swifties felt no sympathy for Jake Gyllenhaal when “All Too Well (10 Minute Version)” came out, so you can bet your last penny that John Mayer is going to feel worse for wear when the fandom is through with this album.

Taylor legitimately said: I NEED HIM TO SUFFER NOW.

Well, we all know the drill by now. Let’s just hope the controversy that’s bound to follow “Would’ve, Could’ve, Should’ve” doesn’t end up overshadowing Midnights and its critically acclaimed debut.


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Jonathan Wright
Jonathan is a religious consumer of movies, TV shows, video games, and speculative fiction. And when he isn't doing that, he likes to write about them. He can get particularly worked up when talking about 'The Lord of the Rings' or 'A Song of Ice and Fire' or any work of high fantasy, come to think of it.